Page 6 of 20 FirstFirst ... 234567891016 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 90 of 293

Thread: St. Vincent's Hospital (7th Ave) - Redevelopment Plan

  1. #76
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    St. Vincent's shows plans for new hospital and residential complex





    11-OCT-07

    St. Vincent's Hospital held a public meeting last night to unveil its plans for a new hospital building to rise on the site of its O'Toole Building on the northwest corner of Seventh Avenue and 12th Street and the plans of Rudin Family Holdings to redevelop 8 of the hospital's buildings on the western portion of the block bounded by 11th and 12th Streets and Sixth and Seventh Avenues.

    The proposed 21-story hospital building, which has been designed by Ian Bader of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, would have a 4-story base and a setback curved tower. The tower would be about 300 feet tall.

    Across the avenue, the residential development would consist of a 21-story building on the avenue that would be about 260 feet high including roof-top mechanical spaces and townhouses with stoops on the two side-streets. Dan Kaplan of FXFowle is the architect for the Rudin project.

    In addition to these two sites, the hospital owns the triangular block that used to be occupied by the Loew's Sheridan movie theater just south of the O'Toole Building. That block is now used by the hospital mostly as a "loading dock."

    The planned buildings are in the Greenwich Village Historic District, but the hospital has not yet submitted a formal application for a certificate of appropriateness from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. The proposed projects will also require numerous other public approvals relating to zoning.

    At the meeting in the hospital's auditorium, Bill Rudin, the CEO of the Rudin organization, said that his company has agreed to pay the hospital about $500 a buildable square feet for its residential development, or about $300 million, under the current building plans. The hospital's building is anticipated to cost about $700 million. It will contain 365 beds, one to a room, a substantial reduction from its present size of about 635 beds.

    The plan calls for the demolition of the four-story O'Toole Building, which was erected in 1961 and was designed by Albert Ledner and is notable for its white-ceramic-tile facades and its nautical motif. Once the new hospital is built and opened on this site, eight of the hospital's 9 buildings across the avenue will be demolished to make way for the Rudin's residential development.

    Mr. Rudin said that although his company's residential projects have always been rental, the more than 400 apartments will be built as condominiums. In addition to the 21-story building on the avenue and 19 townhouses, the Rudin project includes a mid-rise, mid-block building, 15,000-square feet of retail space, 22,500 square feet of medical office space and a garage.

    The design of the new hospital building's tower, shown at the left in the illustration at the right, resembles in its elliptical lenticular shape with "cutting edges" the famous "Boat Building" designed by Max Abramovitz in 1963 for the Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company in Hartford, Conn. Mr. Bader indicated that the new building would be masonry- rather than glass-clad and probably of a reddish color.

    Mr. Kaplan also indicated that a similar palette was likely to be employed in the residential buildings, emphasizing that the new townhouses will be set-back about 10 feet from the building line to permit owners to have front-yard gardens that will add to the "green" component of project.

    In answer to a question from the audience about past promises from the hospital to create an attractive open space on the triangle block, Mr. Bader also emphasized that plans call for landscaping improvements to the "triangle" block.

    No one in the audience asked why the new hospital could not be erected on the triangle block and the very unusual, interesting and idiosyncratic O'Toole Building saved, or used as a base for a new tower similar to what the Hearst Corporation did recently on the southwest corner of 57th Street and Eighth Avenue.

    Copyright 1994-2007 CITY REALTY.COM INC.

  2. #77

    Default

    The curved building looks potentially nice, and the one across the street could be nice too.

    PS: Does anyone know who owns the horrible empty lot on the east side of 7th just south of Greenwich Avenue?

  3. #78
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    This is an important proposal for NYC. Medical facilities in downtown Manhattan are forlorn and in need of modernization. While this plan will need refinement it would be a real shame on all NYers if it is blocked.

    The horrid brown brick block that St. V's up in the 80s is a true nightmare. And the 1961 O'Toole building, while idiosyncratic, is dispensible to make this project a reality. The new medical center will serve NYC for the next 50 + years -- something that the current center is not able to do in any adequate way.

  4. #79

    Default

    ^The need for an adequate facility is obvious, but I have to question whether erecting a new hospital with all single-bed rooms will meet it. Will your HMO pay for one of those? Mine sure won't.

  5. #80
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    East Midtown
    Posts
    6,832

    Default

    I thought about that too...what is this gonna be, a hospital for rich folks only?

  6. #81

    Default

    I'm sure a 300 foot curved brick tower will look great and fit right in the neighborhood

    It could be 500 feet for all I care, just make a statement with the hospital tower please. Pei Cobb Freed shelling out the same design over and over, just brick this time, even greater.

  7. #82

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    The curved building looks potentially nice, and the one across the street could be nice too.

    PS: Does anyone know who owns the horrible empty lot on the east side of 7th just south of Greenwich Avenue?
    The Transit Authority.

  8. #83

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JMGarcia View Post
    The Transit Authority.
    Thanks. It would be nice if they sell it to a developer. It looks horrible.

  9. #84

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    Thanks. It would be nice if they sell it to a developer. It looks horrible.
    Its been tied up for ages by the neighborhood, the CB and Tommy Duane. The TA needs to do a ventilation project for the 1/2/3 and A/C/E lines and the lot is right where the 2 of them cross at Greenwich and 7th possibly killing 2 birds with 1 stone. Unfortunately Tommy is forcing the TA into possibly more expensive and disruptive options because he wants the TA to develop the lot as a park.

    The lot is really too small to make development on it economically feasible for residential or commercial purposes.

  10. #85

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JMGarcia View Post
    Its been tied up for ages by the neighborhood, the CB and Tommy Duane. The TA needs to do a ventilation project for the 1/2/3 and A/C/E lines and the lot is right where the 2 of them cross at Greenwich and 7th possibly killing 2 birds with 1 stone. Unfortunately Tommy is forcing the TA into possibly more expensive and disruptive options because he wants the TA to develop the lot as a park.

    The lot is really too small to make development on it economically feasible for residential or commercial purposes.
    Thanks for the information. Who is Tommy Duane? I assume he's with the local community board. I agree with his idea re: the park. The city should buy the property from the MTA and build a plaza there.

  11. #86
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Tom Duane is the NY State Senator (5 terms) representing the West Side

  12. #87

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JMGarcia View Post
    The lot is really too small to make development on it economically feasible for residential or commercial purposes.
    I would be shocked if this were true. There are many equally small or smaller sites that have been bought for millions and developed into condos.

    I don't see why you couldn't develop residential with ground-level retail on such a prominent and valuable site.

  13. #88

    Default

    The lots is way too angular and there's a height restriction.

  14. #89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JMGarcia View Post
    The lots is way too angular and there's a height restriction.
    I don't understand your point. Many Village lots are angular, yet they are developed with some of the most valuable real estate in the city. Huge chunks of downtown have been height-restricted or otherwise NIMBYized. There is a smaller lot that is landmarked, height-restricted, angular, and SMALLER than this site, a few blocks south on Seventh Avenue and it contains a beautiful new boutique condo selling for millions. There are many other such sites in the W. VIllage. I can think of a newish modernist townhouse near the Meatpacking on a smaller site. The West Village is so valuable you could probably build condos or a house on a 500 square foot site, or perhaps even smaller. If you build condos, just build a couple of triplexes with unusual layouts. They will sell, obviously not at 3,000 a foot or whatever new construction goes for in the neighborhood, but still for millions.

    This site is obviously much bigger than my hypotethical 500 square feet building, and will sell with ease.

    I have a feeling that whomever is publicly claiming the lots "can't be developed" is an Andrew Berman-type, meaning they would rather preserve a junky lot and chain-link fencing than have anything nice, productive or useful built on this prime site.

    If it's so worthless, put it on the market, and watch it get scooped up by a residential developer for a couple million.

  15. #90

    Default

    Buying land from the TA is much more expensive because of the politcal/public review process etc. etc. etc. A small time developer who would put up at max 4 condos on the site is highly unlikely to have the funding to do this never mind make a profit on it.

    In any case, the TA wants to use the land for the ventilation system I mentioned above and/or possibly a neede substation. They don't want to sell it.

Page 6 of 20 FirstFirst ... 234567891016 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Transit Plan for Lower Manhattan
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: March 21st, 2008, 02:24 PM
  2. Coney Island Redevelopment
    By billyblancoNYC in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: October 3rd, 2005, 12:10 AM
  3. Downtown Brooklyn, the Plan
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: July 3rd, 2004, 10:01 PM
  4. Financing Plan Adds Complexity to Remaking of West Side
    By Fabb in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: March 11th, 2003, 06:55 AM
  5. Officials Plan New WTC '93 Memorial
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: February 27th, 2003, 05:51 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software