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Thread: My type of neighborhood (?)

  1. #1

    Default My type of neighborhood (?)

    I am moving to NYC in a few months. I will be taking a job that will pay $120,000 a year. I am not interested in how hip a neighborhood is. Nor do I want to live in the projects. Just looking for a nice comfortable part of town where I can find a modest one bedroom apt. Maybe a neighborhood with a more working class feel to it. Also, I want to live where taking the train into midtown Manhattan (my workplace) is convenient. From my research I am finding that parts of Queens fit my criteria pretty close. Staten Island looks good to me, too, but getting to Manhattan appears to be a bit more challenging than from Queens or Brooklyn. And I bet the ferry is expensive. Also, the Bronx. Any advice on what part of the Bronx to live in? The only problem with that is my disdain for the Yankees so that might not work. Thanks for any advice.

  2. #2
    http://tinyurl.com/2ag28z Front_Porch's Avatar
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    I got married on Staten Island. Lovely boro; the ferry is free.

    Queens, however, is probably better for your purposes. Astoria is a former working class neighborhood that has gotten an influx of some younger people, but is still very down-to-earth.

    The Bronx is one very large borough; it sounds like you'd like some neighborhoods near Pelham Bay Park, but your commute from Queens should be faster.

    ali r.
    {downtown broker}

  3. #3
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    Check out Park Slope. The neighborhood is crossed east to west by 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th Aves (9th aka Prospect Park West). You are are in a neighborhood on the perimeter of Frederick Law Olmstead & Clvert Vaux's Prospect Park (considered their crown jewel). Walking distance to the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Prospect Park Zoo and the Celebrate Brooklyn Concert series in the Prospect Park bandshell each summer. The northern part of Park Slope has streets running north/south that have names. I consider Flatbush Avenue to Union Street the northern slope. From Union Street to 3rd Street I consider center slope. From 6th Street to 15th Street I consider south slope. Other's may disagree with the definition of "north, "center" and "south", but realtors will often note where in the Slope a property is by these adjectives.

    From a residence in center slope, you have access (equi-distance) to the 2, 3, B, F, G, M, Q ,R trains and easy transfer points to 4, D, N trains as well as Long Island Railroad.

    The neighborhood is predominantly Brownstone from 5th Avenue to Prospect Park with a few pre-war apartment buildings thrown in. Between 4th Ave & 5th Ave many newer condominium and rental buildings are going up.

    It's an ideal neighborhood for someone wanting to be in a cosmopolitan area that has a neighborly feel.

    Also try: Brooklyn Heights, Boerum Hill, Fort Greene, Prospect Heights. (all in Brooklyn)

    Or head across the Hudson to Hoboken or Jersey City.

  4. #4

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    Take a look at Long Island City in Queens. IT is one stop from Grand Central Station. http://www.queenswest.com will be of great help.


  5. #5

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    SeattleNative,

    What's the most you are willing to spend on an apartment per month?

    You could live in Lower Manhattan/Financial District for more of a working class feel, or you could live in Midtown East/West, the UES/UWS, Astoria, Park Slope as suggested, and Riverdale in the Bronx.

  6. #6

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    SeattleNative, do you plan to have a car? That's a very important question and may be the deciding factor in choosing where to live.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rapunzel View Post
    SeattleNative, do you plan to have a car? That's a very important question and may be the deciding factor in choosing where to live.
    Shouldn't be.

    Sell your car, and rent one when you feel the need to get out of town.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    Shouldn't be.
    That's a value judgement that SeattleNative needs to make.

    As you know, some people put a premium on having a car readily available to them most times. If SeattleNative happens to fall in this category, then he should choose one of the nice parts of Brooklyn or Queens that are relatively close to the Manhattan and also have garages with nominal fees or (free) street parking.

  9. #9

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    I second the Long Island City recommendation. Real easy access to Midtown Manhattan and a working class feel.

  10. #10

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    ^ They also have strip joints.

  11. #11

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    "I will be taking a job that will pay $120,000 a year." That is a nice chunk of change, what do you do? I would recommend anywhere in Manhattan. That is where I landed.

  12. #12

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    SeattleNative: How much do you plan on spending for housing?

    That will give us a better idea of where you should look.

  13. #13
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    with 120k why live "far away" from your work? Check Upper East(also West) Side o all the areas in downtown (Greenwich, Lower East Side), you will live IN Manhattan and really close by subway to your work.

  14. #14
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    At 120K, you may want to save what you can and put a down payment on a small condo up by Yankee Stadium or maybe somewhere that has been converted a bit more.

    Your salay is at a level theat you should really have things like 401K and a mortgage to keep your taxes at bay for a while.

    Let us know what you choose.

  15. #15
    http://tinyurl.com/2ag28z Front_Porch's Avatar
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    I wouldn't advise anyone to buy in this city without renting for a year first.

    Besides, the opportunity cost in this price range isn't that great . . . $120K income = $250K condo = maybe $13K in mortgage interest + property taxes = what, a $3K or $4K tax break?

    Better to ease in, learn neighborhoods and pricing, and be a smart buyer in a year.

    ali r.
    {downtown broker}
    Last edited by Front_Porch; January 3rd, 2007 at 05:49 PM. Reason: I can't spell

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