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Thread: Haunted New York

  1. #1
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
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    Default Haunted New York

    Anybody know any place in the city, or surrounding area that is haunted? I would love to check it out.

  2. #2
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    My neighbor down the hall swears she has a ghost ...

  3. #3
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    My neighbor down the hall swears she has a ghost ...
    That's the spirit!!!!

  4. #4

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    Haunted house/site directory:

    http://www.hauntedhouse.com/

    You select a state. As to be expected, New York and New Jersey have a good share.

    Too bad most places only give full tours during Halloween season -- I mean, if a place is haunted, isn't it haunted all year round?


    Some of my friends went to Blood Manor at 542 West 27th Street last October, (the only time of year it was open for tours):

    http://www.bloodmanor.com/

    They said that it was much more cool than scary. The website is pretty cool.

  5. #5
    King Omega XVI OmegaNYC's Avatar
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    I heard that the ESB is haunted. Also, I heard that the Daily News building in JC has some ghost walking about. Anybody else ever heard this?

  6. #6

  7. #7

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    My favorite haunted stomping ground in the New York area is the Kings Park Psychiatric Center.

    Its abandoned and illegal to enter. The best time to enter is during the night when there is little to no security, its also the scariest at night though. I would not venture Kings Park by yourself or with one friend, rather a whole group of people is necessary. One it is very easy to get lost, there are only a few access points (all windows are barred) and it is easy to forget where and how you entered at night. Second it is not uncommon to run into homeless people, some of which presumably never left after KP closed in the 1990's.

    I havent been in a while, the last time I went it was at night and remembered hearing noises (probably just cats and raccoons) and walking around in what looked to be blood puddles, the blood was fresh as it was sticking to my shoes, I was so freaked out that I vowed to never return, although I'm itching to now.

    The building that I affectionately call the "Tower of Terror"
    The exterior architecture is actually rather nice.


    More information
    http://www.opacity.us/site3_kings_pa...ric_center.htm

    You can get to Kings Park and the Psychiatric Center by taking the LIRR to Kings Park, it's about an hour trip and will cost you $20 round-trip. Its much better than dishing out $35 for a chessy NYC haunted house.

  8. #8
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    The 8 Most Haunted Houses in New York


    by Greg Young

    New York is a city of eight million stories, and many of them are about ghosts.

    You can't stroll down a sidewalk in New York without tripping over an old ghost story, whether it be the restless spirit of Peter Stuyvesant over at St. Mark's Church-In-The-Bowery, Gilded Age-era spirits roaming the halls of the Dakota Apartments or even the apparitions of suicide victims at the Empire State Building. Our parks are haunted, our bars and restaurants, our churches and theaters. Some even claim the Brooklyn Bridge is haunted, although I pity that mournful apparition on a crowded Saturday afternoon.

    Old places generally accumulate their share of ghost tales, and New York is certainly old indeed -- over 400 years old. But that's not the only reason the Big Apple is so frightfully haunted.
    The city's first great writer, Washington Irving, both popularized and satirized urban legends, spinning his most famous yarn The Legend of Sleepy Hollow out of the misty superstitions of Westchester County.

    With the dawning of second Great Awakening -- centered in western New York state -- the American religious experience became deeply personalized, revising views on the afterlife. New Yorkers of the late 19th century became entranced by the tools of spiritualism -- mediums, magicians, sťances, even Ouija boards. Other realms became accessible, and it seemed believable for some that those who had died might have left unfinished business behind.

    The preservation of old historic structures -- on streets named for the long-dead -- has given certain areas of New York a sense of being trapped in time, ample setting for a spooky story about the people who once inhabited these places.

    Many parks were once cemeteries. Yes, below that bench you're sitting on? Most likely a grave. Washington Square Park has thousands of bodies potentially buried underneath it. In knowing the history of a place, our minds sometimes draw artificial conclusions. If the bodies are there, could their spirits still be hanging around?

    But mostly, ghost stories are generally good for business. When has saying some famous landmark was haunted ever driven anybody away from it? In the end, we all fashion ourselves ghost hunters.

    For six years now, The Bowery Boys: New York City History podcast (which I record with fellow Huffington Post travel writer Tom Meyers) has featured a special Halloween show focusing on some of New York City's scariest tales. You can find our back catalog of ghost story podcasts here.

    In our new show, Mysteries and Magicians of New York, we recount the tales of couple old haunted houses with stories that stretch back into New York's Colonial era.

    Even though New York City has very few free-standing spooky mansions in the traditional horror-movie vein, the city nevertheless possesses a disturbing variety of haunted private residences. Here are eight of our most haunted houses according to legend, many still standing and many still used as private homes and businesses. If you ever get a chance to stay in any of these places overnight, my advice would be -- don't.

    The 'House of Death'
    14 West 10th Street, Manhattan

    This simple brownstone is often considered the MOST haunted place in Manhattan, as a variety of spirits have appeared in the building's stairwells, including that of a former inhabitant -- Mark Twain!

    For more information: the podcast Spooky Stories of New York


    Courtesy Ephemeral New York The Phantom of Gay Street
    12 Gay Street, Manhattan

    This charming home on quiet, curvy Gay Street in the West Village was a former speakeasy, the home to Mayor Jimmy Walker's famous mistress. And the creator of Howdy Doody even lived here. But many believe the party never truly stopped, as ghostly revelers have been seen and heard, including a spirit in an opera cloak affectionately known as 'the Gay Street phantom'. Pictured: A gloomy Gay Street

    For more information: the podcast Haunted Tales of New York


    Courtesy New York Public Library James Brown House
    326 Spring St, Manhattan

    This former home of a Revolutionary War veteran is most famous for the taverns that have occupied its ground floor, including today's jovial Ear Inn. But several decades ago, a sailor named Mickey was killed in an accident in front of the building, and many believe his mischievous spirit still harasses patrons to this day.

    For more information: the podcast Mysteries and Magicians of New York


    Courtesy Municipal Art Society Morris-Jumel Mansion
    65 Jumel Terrace, Manhattan

    This lovely home, open to visitors, also has Revolutionary War connections - George Washington even slept here -- but it's the ghost of the scary old crone Eliza Jumel that frightens children today with her occasional appearance.

    For more information: the podcast Ghost Stories of New York

    Courtesy New York Public Library The Haunted Penthouse
    57 W. 57th Street, Manhattan

    Dorothy Parker (whose ghost is famous for haunting the Algonquin Hotel) used to live in a building at this address, but the tony tower standing here today holds a shocking secret in its penthouse -- the ghosts of two warring lovers who both bickered themselves to death.

    For more information: the podcast Supernatural Stories of New York


    Courtesy Anomalous_a/Flickr The Merchant's House
    29 E. 4th Street, Manhattan

    Poor Gertrude Tredwell. A spinster who lived her entire life here may still haunt this museum which exhibits many of her original possessions. Trust me, she doesn't like it when you rearrange things.

    For more information: the podcast Haunted Tales of New York



    Courtesy New York Public Library Kreischer Mansion
    4500 Arthur Kill Road, Charleston, Staten Island

    The Kreischer Mansion was once mirrored by a twin house that stood next door, both constructed by a brick manufacturer for his sons. One burned down several decades later, but the remaining manor is notorious for its many ghostly apparitions. A bloody, mob-related murder in the past decade further lends to the house's devilish reputation.

    For more information: the podcast Haunted Histories of New York


    Courtesy Staten Island Museum Melrose Hall
    Flatbush Avenue, between Winthrop and Clarkson Streets, Brooklyn

    One of Brooklyn's most terrifying stories involves a former mansion in the Flatbush area, a Colonial-era home full of secret passages, hidden staircases and even a dungeon. For decades during the 19th century, people whispered of a female ghost named Alva who haunted the mysterious house, a woman locked in a room who had died of starvation. The house may be gone, but the spectre may still be hanging around.

    For more information: the podcast Mysteries and Magicians of New York


    Courtesy New York Public Library

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/greg-y...p_ref=new-york

  9. #9
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    The Ear ain't haunted!


    Unless you consider British/Irish accents to be "disturbing".....

  10. #10

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    The Ear may not be haunted, but it does have a fascinating history which I found out in 'New York Originals'. It was built in 1817 with the Hudson River five feet from the front step, owned by a freed slave named James Brown, who was an aide to old GW. He also was thought to be one of the men in the boat in the iconic painting of the Delaware crossing.

    Over the decades, this one owns it, that one owns it, boarding house, flop house, whore house, more land added toward the Hudson, then an NYU student starts working at the rundown place in the 1970s and eventually buys it and takes 30 years renovating it. He said that the 400-year old spruce is what has kept it intact all this time, even though it's slowly sinking into the ground. Several colonial-era artifacts unearthed over the decades, including the sidewalk. Also found was a 1920s gun jammed up into the chimney, probably after a crime. What stories that place could tell.
    Last edited by mariab; October 24th, 2012 at 03:02 PM.

  11. #11
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    It wasn't sinking slowly a few years back.

    Idiots that started the neighboring building did not underpin correctly and emergency (temporary) bracing had to be put in.

    You do not F' with a 200 year old building like that! Add to insult, the building next door is an "economical" (to put it nicely) glass and aluminum clad box.

    http://goo.gl/maps/BYLlt


    BLEH! I SAY!!!!!

  12. #12

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    It's something that happens over decades and centuries, especially considering it was built when the Hudson was just steps away. The box next door (architect Phillip Johnson's last work) was actually a godsend. As part of the land deal, the financiers agreed to shore up the Inn's structural integrity, put on a new roof, and renovate the basement. Another interesting aside: The landmarks commission wouldn't allow a new sign, which used to read 'BAR'. At the time the owners were publishing a music magazine titled 'Ear Magazine', so they simply painted the curved part of the 'B' black so it read 'EAR'. And dat's dat. Story courtesy of 'New York Originals'.


    Back to topic though, I can't imagine a place that old and rich with history doesn't have at least one spirit skulking around somewhere. Imagine some drunk guy zipping up and seeing someone other than himself in the mirror?

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