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Thread: Push for Historic District in Soho & Village

  1. #76

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    It's not really so much the individual building. But when a structure comes down and something incompatible replaces it, the area becomes less coherent as a (historic) district.

  2. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by EastMillinocket View Post
    Untapped Cities
    Unfortunately, 54 MacDougal may not be here for much longer. Hudson Square Rezoning has plans to demolish the building as part of its ongoing initiative to encourage housing development on the West Side of Manhattan, north of Canal Street. Hudson Square Rezoning is run by the New York City Department of City Planning. City Council will vote on the Hudson Square Rezoning project on Wednesday, March 13.
    .
    um...no. Hasty research.

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    It's not really so much the individual building. But when a structure comes down and something incompatible replaces it, the area becomes less coherent as a (historic) district.
    I agree. But I am just worried that arguing for every one makes it harder to save the ones that would be most missed.

    All you have to do is look at the classic town in Europe to validate your statement Zip. No one building is worth saving in itself, but without all of them, the town just would not be anything special anymore.

  4. #79
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Landmarks Begins Prep for South Village Landmarking Vote

    by Sara Polsky



    As part of the city's approval of the Hudson Square rezoning, the Landmarks Preservation Commission promised to consider the landmarking of the South Village (to the north and east of Hudson Square). More specifically, the commission is set to vote on one section of the South Village, north of Houston Street, and survey the rest of it before the end of 2013. So where is the LPC with that right now? The commission will be holding an owner information session on April 15 to explain the designation process to property owners within the proposed district and answer questions. The LPC has put together a map of the proposed district, above, which includes 240 properties in an area bounded by West Fourth and West Houston Streets, Sixth Avenue, and LaGuardia Place. The existing Greenwich Village historic districts—the original district, designated in 1969, and various additions over the years—encompass 2,315 buildings.

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...rking_vote.php

  5. #80
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    A South Village Anniversary

    By Drew


    We’re gearing up for the Landmarks Preservation (LPC) hearing about “Phase II” of the proposed South Village Historic District next Tuesday, June 25. We hope you can join us at the LPC at 1 Centre Street, 9th floor, and testify in favor of designating this and the rest proposed South Village Historic District. You can find sample testimony here. The hearing starts at 2:30 P.M. but should last well past 4 P.M., so you can arrive later in the afternoon.

    The hearing next Tuesday comes almost two years to the day after ‘Phase I’ was designated a landmark district by the commission. The area encompassed by ‘Phase I’ (or as the LPC termed it, Greenwich Village Extension II) stretches between Sixth and Seventh Avenues, between West 4th Street and Houston Street — see map here.

    Today we thought we would take a look at some of the notable sites included within this first part of the South Village Historic District.which landmark designation now helps preserve, as we think about some of the sites which (we hope) “phase II” will soon be protecting as well.

    The Varitype Building at the intersection of Sixth Avenue and Cornelia Street is one of the largest and most striking commercial buildings in the area. The twelve story “flatiron” tower was built in 1907 and designed by Fred Eberling. Read all about its history here.


    The Varitype Building

    In addition to great commercial buildings, the first landmarked part of the South Village also houses some striking religious and institutional structures. Most notable is Our Lady of Pompeii Church. Indelibly tied to the neighborhood’s rich Italian immigrant history, the church is situated on Father Demo Square, named for one of the parish’s long-serving priests. Learn about the history of the building and the congregation here.


    Our Lady of Pompeii Church rises above Fr. Demo Square

    Turning to some smaller-scale buildings, the early nineteenth century structures at 233-37 Bleecker Street are great survivors of numerous cosmetic alterations, but still manage retain their early New York character. There is also evidence that they may have served as the inspiration for the renowned Edward Hopper painting Early Sunday Morning (1930). More about them can be found here.


    233-37 Bleecker Street

    http://gvshp.org/blog/2013/06/21/a-s...e-anniversary/

  6. #81

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    No Opposition to South Village Designation Proposal

    07/01/2013

    Proposed historic district would encompass approximately 250 buildings south of Washington Square Park. On June 25, 2013, the Landmarks Preservation Commission held a hearing on the proposed South Village Historic District. The proposed district is roughly bounded by Washington Square to the north and Houston Street to the south, between Sixth Avenue and LaGuardia Place. The proposed district is comprised of approximately 250 buildings, primarily residential, though also includes commercial and institutional structures.

    The first major wave of development in the area took place during the 1820s and 1830s, as the City expanded northward. Several Federal and Gothic Revival-style rowhouses remain from this era as an upscale residential community. In the 1850s, immigrants began to populate the area, as wealthier citizens migrated further uptown. Rowhouses were converted into multi-family dwellings, and the area saw the construction of the first tenement buildings. Tenements remained the dominant building type throughout the 19th century, and were built in a variety of styles, including Italianate, Neo-Grec, Queen Anne, and Renaissance Revival. By the early 20th century, the neighborhood was largely Italian and the focal point of Italian-American culture. In the 20th century, the neighborhood became a center of bohemian life in the City, with multiple music venues, cafes, theaters, and a thriving gay community.

    State Senator Brad Hoylman attended the hearing to voice his support for designation of the district, which he called an “epicenter of early lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender life in the City,” as well as a “hotbed of political and social revolution.” A representative of Council Speaker Christine Quinn urged Landmarks to designate the district as presented. A representative of Assembly Member Deborah Glick said the district was “full of rich architectural and cultural history,” and urged Landmarks to move swiftly on designation.

    Executive Director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation Andrew Berman said the proposed district was “one of the most important places manifesting evidence of our nation’s last great wave of immigration in the 19th and early 20th centuries.” Berman also noted its artistic significance as the home of the Provincetown Playhouse and performances by such figures as Bob Dylan and Lenny Bruce. Simeon Bankoff, of the Historic Districts Council, said the “architectural mélange works hand-in-hand with the immigrant history of this district,” and that the neighborhood served as a “palimpsest” on which successive waves of “outsider populations” have repurposed to their own ends. Resident Anita Isola said the district “represents Italian and Italian-American history” and, that if not protected by landmarking, developers “are ready to swarm down like locusts.” Other residents expressed concern about inappropriate development in the neighborhood, and pressed Landmarks not to excise New York University’s Vanderbilt Hall, at 40 Washington Square South, from the district, so that the university could not replace it with a tower.

    There was no testimony in opposition to designation. A date has not been scheduled for a vote on designation.

    © 1997-2010 New York Law School

  7. #82
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    One-third of South Village still not landmarked

    BY ANDREW BERMAN

    Word that an eight-story building is planned for 134 W. Houston St., next to the MacDougal Sullivan Gardens, has refocused attention on the unfinished fight to preserve the historic South Village, and to protect it from overdevelopment.

    We’ve made incredible progress since the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation first started pushing the city to preserve this area 10 years ago: Two historic districts containing nearly 500 buildings on more than two dozen blocks have been designated, protecting a huge slice of our neighborhood’s history and preventing high-rise development by New York University and others.

    But these recent plans highlight the fact that a large chunk of this historic neighborhood has still not been landmarked, including the entire section south of Houston St., and that much of this area has zoning that would allow new developments as tall as 250 feet, or even greater.

    In 2006, G.V.S.H.P. submitted a formal proposal to the city to landmark the entire South Village. Earlier this year we also proposed a “contextual rezoning” of the neighborhood, which would impose height limits for new development where none currently exist. The city designated the first phase of our proposed landmark district in 2010, covering much of the area between Sixth Ave. and Seventh Ave. South, and Houston and W. Fourth Sts. The city designated the second phase in late 2013, covering much of the area between Sixth Ave. and LaGuardia Place, Houston St. and Washington Square.

    But a couple of key sites were excluded, including the row of 1840s houses on the north side of Houston St. between MacDougal and Sullivan Sts., where the new eight-story development is planned. And under the prior administration, the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission refused to consider the remaining section of G.V.S.H.P.’s proposed South Village Historic District, a triangular swath covering about 200 buildings on 11 blocks stretching from Houston St. south to Watts St., from Sixth Ave. to the east side of Thompson St.

    So we’ve been pushing the new administration — which has been quite willing to reconsider policies and decisions of the prior administration — to move ahead with landmarking the remainder of the South Village. But the administration’s position on this, as well as on our rezoning proposal for the area, still remains to be seen.

    I met recently with the new chairperson of the Landmarks Preservation Commission, Meenakshi Srinivasan, and raised with her the incredible importance of landmarking the remainder of the South Village. The proposed eight-story building adjacent to MacDougal Sullivan Gardens — a landmarked, historic complex of 22 three-and-a-half-story 1840s houses with shared communal backyards — is unfortunately only the tip of the iceberg in terms of threats the South Village faces.

    In 2012, 186 Spring St., an 1824 rowhouse that was determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places for the vital role it played in the L.G.B.T. (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) civil rights movement, was demolished after the city refused to save it, in spite of pleas from G.V.S.H.P., elected officials across the city and a bevy of L.G.B.T. groups.

    In 2013, 54 MacDougal St., an 1820 rowhouse with historical connections to Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, as well as prominent early New York families the Ludlows and Weeks, was allowed to be demolished by the city over similar strenuous objections. Both sites remain nothing more than holes in the ground.


    “D” marks a row of unlandmarked low-rise buildings on W. Houston St. between MacDougal and Sullivan Sts.
    at risk of development — one of them already slated for an eight-story tower. “P” is Passannante Playground.
    Courtesy of G.V.S.H.P.


    What could be built on these and other South Village sites is perhaps more disturbing. For the most part, the South Village has zoning that encourages tall towers surrounded by open space. On smaller sites, typically no more than an eight-story building can be built. But on a large enough site, new construction in the South Village could easily reach 250 to 300 feet in height.

    That is why we fought so hard to get N.Y.U. Law School’s Vanderbilt Hall included in the South Village Historic District designated in 2013. Covering an entire city block on Washington Square South, without landmark protections, the low-rise, brick and stone law school could have easily been demolished and replaced with a 300-foot-tall dorm. Given N.Y.U.’s unceasing penchant for expansion, this no doubt would have eventually happened. Fortunately, due to our success in getting the building included in the new landmark district, such a development should now no longer be possible.

    But there are other sites in the South Village where an assemblage of this size is possible, and a development of this scale not only feasible, but in many ways, encouraged under the existing zoning.

    That’s why we must get the city to agree to landmark protections for the remaining sections of the South Village, or a contextual rezoning — or both, as G.V.S.H.P. has proposed.

    There’s too much at stake. The South Village is truly one of New York and the nation’s treasures — a neighborhood of incredibly rich history reflecting the immigrant experience of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and revolutions in music, the arts, literature, society and culture.

    That’s why in 2012, G.V.S.H.P. successfully nominated the South Village as one of the seven most important, endangered historic sites in New York State, as chosen by the Preservation League of New York State. And that’s also why G.V.S.H.P. nominated the entire South Village for listing on the State and National Registers of Historic Places — a designation approved earlier this year.

    The remaining roughly one-third of the South Village still lacking landmark protections includes some of the most vital historic sites the neighborhood — from the 1886 St. Anthony of Padua Church, at 155 Sullivan Street, the country’s oldest extant Italian-American church, to countless early 19th-century houses, colorful and varied late 19th-century tenements, and innovative 20th-century housing developments and institutions.

    Not only could these buildings be lost at any time, but without appropriate landmark and zoning protections for the whole area, even the landmarked portions of the South Village are not entirely safe. The planned eight-story development at 134 W. Houston St. will, for instance, loom over the neighboring landmarked three-and-a-half-story houses of MacDougal Sullivan Gardens. If a developer (or N.Y.U.) were to assemble that entire row of houses, that development could grow to a 250-foot-tall tower!

    Support for extending landmark and zoning protections to the remainder of the South Village enjoys virtually unanimous support from local elected officials, civic groups and Community Board 2. Now it’s time for the city to get onboard, and move ahead with this much-needed and long-overdue proposal.

    If you want to help, you can send a letter to the mayor and Landmarks Preservation Commission chairperson by going to gvshp.org/svlet.

    Berman is executive director, Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

    http://thevillager.com/2014/10/16/on...ot-landmarked/

  8. #83

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    So when are the going to push for the Manhattan historic district? They're out of control.

  9. #84

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    So when are the going to push for the Manhattan historic district? They're out of control.
    Oh Noooo the sky is falling!

  10. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
    So when are the going to push for the Manhattan historic district? They're out of control.
    They are pushing for a Manhattan historic district: they are just going about it - one little 'historic' neighborhood at a time. Sneaky bastards...LOL

  11. #86
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    What on earth would you be expecting to replace the current buildings in this area with?

    West Houston being so wide is a very appealing streetscape as it is. I think it would be ruined if the existing low-rises were replaced with anything higher and newer, i.e. out of character. Similarly for Sixth Avenue around there, too, IMO.

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