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Thread: 330 Madison Avenue - by Kahn & Jacobs

  1. #46
    Senior Member Bob's Avatar
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    These international-style boxes of curtain wall are easily changed according to the tastes of the day. Some time, perhaps decades from now, some people will look at the few remaining intact 1950s/60s boxes and say, "Wow, I'm sure glad they kept it original." Nah!!

  2. #47

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    I think that many of the International-style buildings are quite nice. They have interesting, layered shapes and are better than the simple boxes that cheap schmucks like Zuckerman and Macklowe build today. However, 330 Madison's facade is hideous, and the new one should be an improvement.

  3. #48

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    The one bit of new glass that I saw on the north facade did not look very nice.

  4. #49

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    They started the first row of glass on the 42nd Street side. Can't really tell what it's going to look like.

  5. #50

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    Thanks. Can you post a photo of this and 350 Madison?

  6. #51

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    The glass they've installed on the bottom reminds me of 360 Madison Avenue





    ..but the bit of glass they've installed up above looks more milky green. Hopefully more like the Hippodrome Building and 430 Park avenue than that horrible re-cladding at 112 W. 34th Street by Malkin et al.







  7. #52

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    By the way, here is more sad news about great old buildings that eventually will be razed by SL Green:

    http://www.observer.com/node/36909


    SL Green Dreams Grand Central With $76 Million Madison Ave. Buy
    By John Koblin
    March 11, 2007 | 8:00 p.m


    THE MEGA-DEVELOPER SL GREEN CAN NOW BUILD a 900,000-square-foot tower at the foot of Grand Central Terminal.

    This comes after SL Green purchased two small buildings, one at 331 Madison Avenue and the other at 48 East 43rd Street, for $76 million. SL Green owns a neighboring building on the block, at 317 Madison Avenue.

    The Cushman & Wakefield investment-sales dream team, Richard Baxter, Scott Latham, Ron Cohen and Jon Caplan, brokered the deal.

    Isaac Zion, a managing director at SL Green, also worked on the deal. He said SL Green will push rents and attract better tenants for the new buildings.

    Mr. Zion said SL Green is seriously considering the possibility of building one big tower at one of the most lucrative addresses in the city.

    “Given its location,” he told The Observer, “I think it plays out well as an office building to take in a different direction.”

    If SL Green decides to build the tower, it would be between 42nd and 43rd streets, on Madison Avenue and a part of Vanderbilt Avenue.

    As the properties now stand, 331 Madison Avenue is a 14-story, 92,000-square-foot building, and 48 East 43rd Street is a seven-story, 22,850-square-foot loft building.

    The two buildings were sold by U.S. Trust on behalf of a group of investors, a source close to the deal said.

  8. #53

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    So goes the evolution of the city. There was once a beautiful church where those current buildings stand too.





    Ideally, development rights should be transferred one block north to the post-modern building at 335 Madison. It's occupied by Bank of America, who's looking for more space anyway. I'd imagine the building is not too up to date since it was converted in 1983 and uses the bones of the old Biltmore Hotel.


  9. #54

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    I go on and on about how beautiful London is, but sadly, NY once was as stunning.


  10. #55
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    But imagine the smell of horse and the outdoor plumbing.

  11. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    I go on and on about how beautiful London is, but sadly, NY once was as stunning.
    Fortunately we realized there are more important things than what buildings look like.

  12. #57
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    Few things are more important than good architecture. People have to live and work all day in buildings. Attractive buildings enhance our lives, while ugly buildings alienate people from each other and their environment.

  13. #58
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    It's far less about the look of the building and far more about how people interact with it. Styles come in and out of vogue. While we love aesthetics here, and we should, we're enthusiasts, aren't we, it's much more important, in the long run, that the building effectively serve it's function in a way that it helps people do what they need to do without hassle or worry. This could be to reduce the fear of crime, increase the comfort of home, or simplify running an errand. Most people couldn't even tell you what a building looks like on the skyline when they are standing next to said building. For the people visiting NY the skyline is majestic as they enter, and non-existent while they are here. Times Square isn't much of an architectural mecca, but the buildings there are well suited to take advantage of the area's popularity (which it wasn't always).

    I guess what I'm getting at is that yes, few things are as important as architecture, but no, how it looks has nothing to do with it. The fall of the Soviet Union didn't happen because someone started dozing those awful 60s style concrete blocks and replacing them with Gehry masterpieces, as romantic as that sounds to us on this board.

  14. #59
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    There were no Gehry-like buildings going up in the USSR before the fall; what few individually styled good new buildings in Russia have gone up since the break up the strangely named Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

    The visual environment that a society builds reflects its core values. The ungainly behemoths of hoped-for money making machines that are so prevalent all over the world these days are apt metaphors for where we're at.

  15. #60
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    For me at least, part and parcel of whether or not a building is attractive and can enhance our lives, is that people actually enjoy using it to live in, or to earn their livelihoods, or for their transportation, or civic engagement, and so on. This is good architecture.

    I do not believe impractical buildings, bereft of utility, can have much beauty. They only serve to alienate people at the expense of the common good.

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