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Thread: Race for the White House

  1. #3226
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Today we find out that Fannie / Freddie gave huge contributions to politicians over the years and that Obama is the 3rd highest recipient of those contributions (after Chris Dodd and John Kerry). McCain was way down on the list.

    All things considered this is not the kind of news that is beneficial right about now.

  2. #3227
    Senior Member joe25's Avatar
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    http://blogs.abcnews.com/politicalpu...using-com.html

    oh my god
    nov 4, the most unnerving day of my life

    I dont know what worries me the most, her ignorance, or the crowds.

    Heres video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eO4k1fIjivg audio sucks

  3. #3228
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    She reads and lies with equal conviction.

  4. #3229

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    ^
    That speech was one on the first that was not a variation of the convention script. It shows.

    Palin thought Fannie and Freddie are public agencies, and "had gotten too big and too expensive for taxpayers." Considering the nationwide crisis in home ownership, this is a major blunder that should be exploited.

  5. #3230

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    I can just hear her saying, "but you know what I meant".

  6. #3231

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    September 8, 2008
    CNN poll: Convention bounces cancel each other out
    Posted: 06:45 PM ET


    From CNN Ticker Producer Alexander Mooney




    The presidential race remains close
    with just 57 days left until the election.

    (CNN) Why is the presidential race dead even after both parties have had their conventions? In a nutshell, it's because the conventions have not changed the basic dynamic of the race.

    Earlier: CNN poll shows race dead even

    New numbers released by CNN Monday explain just how the presidential race remains so close with 57 days to go until voters weigh in at the polls: the conventions were so successful for both parties that that each essentially canceled the other out.

    The candidates' favorable ratings are identical (60 percent) and almost identical to what they were before the conventions began. The GOP convention made Republicans more enthusiastic (an increase of 17 points). But Democrats are more enthusiastic as well (up 14 points), so an 11 point "enthusiasm gap" favoring remains: 71 percent of Democrats say they are enthusiastic about the election, compared to 60 percent of Republicans.

    The candidates' strengths and weaknesses on the issues also have not changed over the last month Obama retains his edge on the economy and health care; McCain's advantage remains on Iraq and terrorism.

    Full poll results [PDF]

    In fact, the Iraq issue is instructive of just how effectively the conventions molded public opinion. Before the Democratic convention, McCain had a 9-point edge; after the Democratic convention it was a tie, and now McCain has a 14-point lead on Iraq.

    But not every convention theme appears to have resonated although the GOP convention portrayed McCain as a maverick reformer, more Americans see Obama as a "real reformer" (48-41 percent) and as someone who is "not a typical politician" (56-34 percent)

    Who would Americans be prouder to have as president? That's a tie 46 percent say Obama, 44 percent say McCain, despite the emphasis on McCain's war record at the GOP gathering in Minnesota. On the other hand, McCain may have managed to best Obama on values (49 percent say McCain is more likely to share their values compared to 45 percent for Obama; in mid-August Obama had a 4-point margin on that measure).

    It appears McCain was able to gain some ground on "change," a theme that the Obama campaign has long called its own. But in the wake of McCain's pick of Washington outsider Sarah Palin, the Arizona senator has narrowed Obama's lead on that item from 18 points to 8.

    CNN Polling Director Keating Holland says both party's conventions clearly had their desired effect.

    "Although McCain's acceptance speech did not get the same rave reviews as Obama's speech, the two conventions appear to have had the same overall effect 48 percent said that the GOP convention made them more likely to vote for McCain, 51 percent said the same about the Democratic convention and Obama," he said.

    But even as polls tighten in McCain's favor, a slim majority (52 percent) of Americans still think Obama will win in November.

    "We'll see if that number changes later this fall once the public sees the latest round of polls," Holland said.



    2008 Cable News Network LP, LLLP. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved.


  7. #3232

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    National


    CAMPAIGN '08
    Sarah Palin's appeal to working-class women may be limited

    For many of these critical swing voters, economic interests trump any admiration of the Alaska governor's maternal grit, and some are repelled by her sarcastic jabs at Obama.



    By Faye Fiore and Peter Wallsten
    Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
    September 7, 2008


    Courtesy liam mitchell
    Pictures above were not in original article - Z.

    UNIONTOWN, PA. -- Trish Heckman, a 49-year-old restaurant cook and disappointed Hillary Rodham Clinton supporter, watched last week as the country's newest political star made her explosive debut.

    She followed the news when John McCain introduced Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as his vice presidential running mate, paid attention to the raging debate over her qualifications, even tuned in to watch her dramatic speech at the Republican convention.

    But when it came down to an issue Heckman really cares about -- sending a daughter to college on $10.50 an hour -- her desire to see a woman reach the White House took a back seat to her depleted savings account.

    "I wanted Hillary to win so bad, but I saw Sarah, and it just didn't work for me," said Heckman, taking a break in the empty courtyard of J. Paul's restaurant in a downtown struggling to revive. "I have no retirement. Obama understands it's the economy. He knows how we live."

    Heckman, like many others in this former coal-mining town at the western foot of the Appalachians, is the type of voter that both presidential campaigns will target in the final two months. Polls show that working-class women have emerged as one of the most critical categories of swing voters at a time when McCain and Barack Obama have galvanized their party bases but still need more votes to win.

    Palin, a little-known 44-year-old mother of five, burst onto the scene just days ago, presenting herself as the woman to finally shatter the glass ceiling cracked by the Democratic New York senator's historic candidacy.

    But now, after a chaotic introductory week that sparked national debates on McCain's judgment, Palin's experience and even her teenage daughter's pregnancy, the initial signs are not entirely positive for the reinvigorated Republican ticket.

    Interviews with some two dozen women here after Palin's convention speech found that these voters were not swayed by the fiery dramatic speeches or compelling personal biographies that marked both the Republican and Democratic conventions. Instead, they were thinking about the price of milk -- nearly $5 a gallon -- or the healthcare coverage that many working families here cannot afford.

    Even if they admire Palin's attempt to juggle political ambition, an infant son with Down syndrome and a pregnant unwed daughter, these women say that maternal grit is not enough to win their votes.

    Waitress Judy Artice, "Miss Judy," as she is known at Glisan's roadside diner, declared Palin "the perfect candidate" after watching her Wednesday speech. That said, Artice had already decided that her vote would go to the first candidate who mentioned gasoline prices.

    "And -- I'll be danged -- it was Obama," Artice, 46, said between servings of liver and onions during the lunch rush.

    Both campaigns have signaled that these blue-collar hamlets could be where the election will be decided, an assessment made even more likely when the nation's unemployment rate hit a five-year high in August.

    McCain dominates among white men, and Obama, who would be the first black president, is all but sweeping the black vote, most polls show. That leaves white women, the so-called Clinton base, as one of the most sought-after voting groups left on the table.

    Recent surveys suggest that Palin, who opposes abortion even in cases of rape or incest, is not necessarily poised to help McCain with moderate women. A National Journal/Hotline daily tracking poll released Friday found that 49% of male voters say Palin is prepared to be president but that only 41% of female voters think so.

    But Republican strategists hope that Palin's middle-class roots, union-member husband and love of hunting will help her connect to rural and small-town folks in battleground states such as Pennsylvania.

    This is, after all, a place where schools close on the opening day of deer hunting season, people are conflicted about abortion rights and racial bias still simmers.

    Sara Taylor, former Bush White House political affairs director, described Palin as a "living, breathing replica of the middle class" who "connected with people in a way we haven't seen a national figure do in a long time."

    And Uniontown was very much in the McCain campaign's sights throughout a convention that showcased Palin's small-town roots while portraying Obama, who lives in Chicago, as a big-city elitist.

    Republican delegates and activists in the convention hall delighted in Palin's jabs at the Illinois senator, such as when she poked fun at the columned backdrop for Obama's stadium acceptance speech or mocked him as intent on "turning back the waters and healing the planet."

    For many women here watching closely, though, that portion of Palin's speech was all they needed to hear.

    When Palin belittled Obama's history as a community organizer on Chicago's South Side -- suggesting he was a do-little activist while she, as the former mayor of tiny Wasilla, Alaska, had "actual responsibilities" -- Sandy Ryan, 59, clicked the remote.

    "That's enough of that. I switched over to 'House Hunters,' " she said with some disgust over dessert with a group of women from the senior housing complex she manages.

    One of a dwindling number of coveted undecideds, Ryan gets a firsthand view of retirees forced to choose between food and medication. She is not convinced Obama has the experience to be president, but Palin only reinforced her concern that McCain would mean four more years of divisiveness and gridlock.

    Patty Tobal, a 63-year-old retired nurse and lifelong feminist, shut off the TV set and went to bed. The promise of a woman on the ticket had piqued her curiosity, but she found Palin's sarcasm offensive and her priorities out of touch.

    "We don't need any more fighting in Washington," Tobal said while having her hair done at a little shop on Route 40, where the customers go longer between appointments in these hard times. "Women are not for women just because they are women. We are intelligent enough to make a conscious decision."

    Life here is basic and hard. Coal miners still work the mountains. The upscale Nemacolin Woodlands Resort just down the road is replete with shops and restaurants that Uniontown residents can't afford.

    And residents describe their downtown, where a portrait of native son and five-star general George C. Marshall covers a building several stories high, as "quaint but sad."

    If these women are any indication, the threat to Obama's camp is not that they will side with McCain but that they will stay home, as Heckman, the restaurant chef and single mother of two, says many people on her block plan to do.

    But those disenchanted voters could be balanced by newly inspired ones, such as Jennifer Glisan, 23, an emergency medical technician who saves lives every week but cannot afford health insurance. Clinton's gender was enough to awaken her political interest, but Palin's failed to hold it.

    "I think Palin is a fake. She will run the economy into the ground," Glisan said after catching glimpses of the vice presidential nominee's speech between emergency calls.

    "I have to kill myself every day at work to earn enough to pay for gas to get there. I think Obama is sincere. I think we need a change."



    Copyright 2008 Los Angeles Times

    Last edited by Zephyr; September 9th, 2008 at 12:53 AM.

  8. #3233
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    I didnt want to see it but now its a must Obama must act like all other politicians and fight back hard and ugly.

  9. #3234
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    The source of the Hudson is in New York, not in Canada.
    OK, so you will be safe from Palin there.


    You don't have fur, do you Zip?

  10. #3235

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    Life here is basic and hard.
    You would think that universal access to healthcare would be a top priority, but still, they are undecided; what are they thinking?

  11. #3236
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kliq6 View Post
    I didnt want to see it but now its a must Obama must act like all other politicians and fight back hard and ugly.

    Actually, he doesn't.

    Remember what worked for Bush. Obama does not do the nasty, he needs his people to do it, or, rather, "independents".

    Bush did not run the Swift Boat ads putting Kerry onthe defensive. Bush himself did not, as an AWOL Ricky Schroder. comment about the veracity/weight of Kerry's purple hearts. It was all these cover groups, liek the Swift Boat Veterans that brough up these fallacies.

    Even after the election when ties, connections, and factual refutal of the peoples claims were presented, people still did not want to admit they were fooled. It worked like a poisoned charm.

    Obama has to respond, but he should not respond by getting defensive, or nasty. He needs to be strong, stand on his base, and let others do the refutal. He needs others to stir up nasty rumors (Example: What is Palin's stand on special education funding? How will she educate/care for her Down Syndrome child as VP? Will she neglect the kid, or the office to provide the other with the attension he/it deserves?).

    Bush himself never really went on the attack inhis campaign.

    Cheney (wahhhh!) did.

    Lets see if they get this right.

  12. #3237
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward View Post
    You would think that universal access to healthcare would be a top priority, but still, they are undecided; what are they thinking?
    Just saw "Who killed the Electric Car" last night. I think the answer is similar. People are only undecided when they don't want to make the decision. Don't tell and you avoid confrontation on a difficult issue.

    They do not want to say one way or the other and alienate one base of supporters. Go for universal health care and you lose major $$, which COULD be used to get votes. Go against UHC and you lose votes, BUT you may be able to buy them back.....

  13. #3238

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ninjahedge View Post
    OK, so you will be safe from Palin there.
    It's not Palin I'm worried about, I've been watching McCain's mannerisms since the convention. He has the appearance of a handled person; reminds me of Reagan in the last 2 years of his presidency [shudder].

    It was kept secret by the WH press; I think CBS News Leslie Stahl wrote about it in her book, that Reagan was exhibiting signs of Alzheimer's at the time. Reagan was not yet 70 when he took office. McCain is 72, and he looks closer to 80 than 70.

    President Puppet?

    You don't have fur, do you Zip?
    And a purse. That's why I'll go to Europe.

  14. #3239
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    Palin thought Fannie and Freddie are public agencies, and "had gotten too big and too expensive for taxpayers." Considering the nationwide crisis in home ownership, this is a major blunder that should be exploited.
    Why am I not surprised?

  15. #3240

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    I have to correct myself. It wasn't really a blunder (or a gaff). She really doesn't know.

    If you go to YouTube and search keywords Palin Church, you'll see the Palin not from a few years ago, but a few months ago. Palin talks about god and the pipeline, God and the Iraqi War.

    Funny, but someone keeps taking some down, and others reappear.

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