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Thread: Race for the White House

  1. #1231

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    Quote Originally Posted by kliq6 View Post
    There is no way in Hell that Hillary would take VP under Obama, a slim cahnce he would take VP under here as he has much more of a future, its now or never for Hillary to become president
    Only if [D]s remain stupid and stubborn would they miss this opportunity for a decent and representative (by American political standards) ticket.

    I don't know, offhand, who within the [D] leadership can act like an adult in this situation, but that is what is needed.

  2. #1232
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Romney SUSPENDS Campaign ...

  3. #1233
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    GOP sources: Romney to suspend campaign

    CNN

    Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney will suspend his bid for the Republican presidential nomination, GOP sources tell CNN.

    Romney had won 270 delegates in through the Super Tuesday contests, compared with front-runner John McCain's 680.

    Romney had no public events Wednesday and instead met with aides to discuss strategy to stay in the race through March 4.

    "It is tough to saddle up this a.m.," one Romney adviser told CNN the morning after his disappointing Super Tuesday finish.

    Although he outspent his rivals, Romney received just 175 delegates on Super Tuesday, compared with at least 504 for McCain and 141 for former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, according to CNN estimates ...

    Suspending a campaign has a different meaning depending on the party.

    On the Republican side, decisions on how to allocate delegates is left to the state parties.

    On the Democratic side, a candidate who "suspends" is technically still a candidate so he or she keeps both district and statewide delegates won through primaries and caucuses. Superdelegates are always free to support any candidate at any time, whether the candidate drops out, suspends or stays in.

    National party rules say that a candidate who "drops out" keeps any district-level delegates he or she has won so far but loses any statewide delegates he or she has won.

    Romney is expected to announce his decision Thursday afternoon at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington, three Republican sources told CNN ...

  4. #1234

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    Romney suspends presidential campaign

    CNN) -- Mitt Romney suspended his bid for the Republican presidential nomination Thursday, saying if he continued it would "forestall the launch of a national campaign and be making it easier for Sen. Clinton or Obama to win."

    "In this time of war, I simply cannot let my campaign be a part of aiding a surrender to terror. This is not an easy decision. I hate to lose," the former Massachusetts governor said.

    "If this were only about me, I'd go on. But it's never been only about me. I entered this race because I love America, and because I love America, in this time of war I feel I have to now stand aside for our party and for our country."


    Romney made the announcement Thursday afternoon at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington. continued

  5. #1235
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    Quote Originally Posted by investordude View Post
    Again zippy, California has an unusually high percentage of unaffiliated voters. They couldn't vote in the republican primary. So, they all voted in the democratic primary or not at all. The higher turnout number there is not clearly meaningful

    I think there is a very real risk independent Latinos and Asians might vote for McCain in California - that's not a given, but I think Obama needs to show he can close with hispanics in Texas if he wants to become president.
    In the end if its her or him, the democrat canidate will win the latino vote

  6. #1236

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    Even against John McAmnesty - as some right wing radio hosts call him?

  7. #1237
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Good to see the Republicans are fossilizing their support of McCain.

  8. #1238
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post

    Good to see the Republicans are fossilizing their support of McCain.
    Ooops ^ should have writ "solidifying"

  9. #1239
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Something tells me that Mitt's crew won't be moving over to Obama, despite this appeal from Barack's camp:

    http://my.barackobama.com/page/s/videoyeswecan

  10. #1240

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    Mitt's sons should get behind Ron Paul and his opposition to the death tax, -- it's the only way they'll see any inheritance.

  11. #1241
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    "In this time of war, I simply cannot let my campaign be a part of aiding a surrender to terror. This is not an easy decision. I hate to lose,"
    Aiding a surrender to terror?

    OMG, they are playing the fear card. Obama and Hillary are Terrorist sympathizers...

  12. #1242
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Good to see the Republicans are fossilizing their support of McCain.
    Maybe they are swatch-ising their support......


    No?


    But I think the original term oddly fits given the support is for McCain....Freudian Loft?

  13. #1243

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    Democrats Living Dangerously
    Early Voting Insanity And a GOP Gift


    By George F. Will
    Thursday, February 7, 2008; A21


    LOS ANGELES -- Forewarned, Democrats now are forearmed -- not that they will necessarily make sensible use of the gift. Tuesday's voting armed Democratic voters with the name of the candidate that their nominee will face in the fall. Will their purblind party now nominate the most polarizing person in contemporary politics, knowing that Republicans will nominate the person who tries to compensate for his weakness among conservatives with his strength among independent voters who are crucial to winning the White House?

    Perhaps. The Republican Party's not-so-secret weapon always is the Democratic Party, with its entertaining thirst for living dangerously.

    John McCain has become the presumptive nominee of the conservative party without winning majority support of conservatives. According to exit polls, he lost them Tuesday to Mitt Romney in his home state of Arizona, 43 to 40. He lost them in that day's biggest battleground, California, 43 to 35.

    The surest way to unify the Republican Party, however, is for Democrats to nominate Hillary Clinton. Barack Obama, the foundation of whose candidacy is his early opposition to the war in Iraq, would be a more interesting contrast to the candidate who is trying to become the oldest person ever elected to a first presidential term and who almost promises a war with Iran ("There is only one thing worse than military action, and that is a nuclear-armed Iran").

    Obama's achievements on Tuesday would have been considered astonishing just two weeks ago, but they have been partially discounted because the strength of his ascendancy became so apparent in advance. And he would have taken an even larger stride toward the nomination were it not for a novelty that advanced thinkers have inflicted on the political process.

    Once upon a time, in an America consigned to the mists of memory, there was a quaint and, it is now said, oppressive custom called Election Day. This great national coming together of the public in public polling places, this rare communitarian moment in a nation of restless individualists, was an exhilarating episode in our civic liturgy. Then came, in the name of progress, the plague of early voting.

    In many states, voting extends over weeks, beginning before campaigns reach their informative crescendos. This plague has been encouraged by people, often Democrats, who insist, without much supporting evidence, that it increases voter turnout, especially among minorities and workers for whom the challenge of getting to polling places on a particular day is supposedly too burdensome.

    The plague made many Super Tuesday voters -- those who hurried to cast their ballots for John Edwards, Rudy Giuliani and other dear departeds -- feel like ninnies, which serves them right. On Tuesday, the Democratic Party paid a price for early voting, especially in California, where more than 2 million votes were cast in the 29 days before what is anachronistically called Election Day. The price was paid by the party's most potentially potent nominee, Obama, whose surge became apparent after many impatient voters had already rushed to judgment.

    Although Obama lost California to Clinton by almost 390,000 votes, he surely ran much closer in the votes cast on Tuesday, after her double-digit lead in polls had evaporated. Had he won the third of the three C's -- he won Connecticut, where a large portion of voters are in her New York City media market, and in Colorado, a red Western state rapidly turning purple -- he might now be unstoppable.

    Evangelical Christians, who in 2006 gave Republicans more votes than Democrats received from African Americans and union members combined, wanted to determine the GOP's nominee -- and perhaps they have done so. By giving so much support to an essentially regional candidate, Mike Huckabee, rather than to Mitt Romney, they have opened McCain's path to capturing the conservative party without capturing conservatives. McCain's Tuesday triumph was based in states (New York, New Jersey, Illinois, California) he will not carry in November.

    Although Obama is, to say no more, parsimonious with his deviations from liberal orthodoxy, he is said to exemplify "post-partisan" politics. The same is sometimes said of McCain. Five days before Super Tuesday, McCain received an endorsement from California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, another supposed practitioner of post-partisanship, which often looks a lot like liberalism that would prefer not to speak its name. Three days before that endorsement, the emblem of Schwarzenegger's post-partisanship -- his extremely liberal (lots of mandates and taxes) and expensive ($14.9 billion, slightly more than the state's current budget deficit) plan for universal health care -- died in an 11-member state Senate committee, where it got just one vote.

    Perhaps we are seeing the future. It looks familiar.

    georgewill@washpost.com

  14. #1244

    Default why did hillary accept fox news debate?

    I can't fathom why a democrat would do that in a still going on democratic primary. The people who fundraise for democrats hate Fox, as do many democratic party voters.

    Its important to be clear that as president, Fox would have access to the candidates (nobody should be able to deny media access to the press if they are in public office). But there will be plenty of time to debate McCain on Fox in the general election - I think most dems are aware they need to do that before November. This accepting a debate in a primary just seems like a slap in the face to the democratic party small donor establishment.

  15. #1245

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    Hillary needs free publicity. She also does relatively well under fire, and her opponents have actually been working in her favor, to some extent. People don't like to be told what to think, and the Hillary outlash has come to seem excessively strident to many. My fondness for Obama is also fading, as in his quest to present his (admitted) strengths he's starting to come off smug to me.

    Obviously the press wants nothing to do with a Hillary presidency. They were nothing if not nasty to her during her eight years in the White House, from Fox to The Washington Post. They have been happy to foment the specious argument that she is not "electable." Please, do they really think Ohio, Pennsylvania and Florida will vote Repuiblican this year, regardless of whether it's Clinton or Obama? It's fairly certain that the other states that went for Kerry will continue to vote democrat, regarless of the candidate.

    McCain is insane. Hey, that rhymes nicely, maybe it could be an underground catchphrase.

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