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Thread: Rezoning the Garment District

  1. #31

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    I'm with lofter, almost 30 years living in the garment district...and i have never come across a dour alley (any ally for that matter), anywhere in the garment district?

  2. #32
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    When the grid street plan was devised in 1811 they purposefully left out alleys. You'll still find a few downtown below 14th Street, but even many of those have been de-mapped (although some still exist as private right of ways).

  3. #33

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    I got my thoughts mixed up. I was imaging the dour streets of the district as pedestrian alleys with cafes and outdoor seating, something like stone street.

  4. #34

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    Sorry, no.

    What the area (and the city) needs is more real business, not "tourist destinations". I'd be happy if it was garment business, but, especially on the manufacturing side, that's not happening. Be that as it may, the area needs to be allowed to (re)develop in a way that suits what upcoming businesses need, not what tourists may want, and not what the now exiting (or exited) businesses built.

    Quote Originally Posted by futurecity View Post
    God, imagine if they turned this area into a massive pedestrianized district full of cafes, boutique hotels and restaurants. The narrow dour alleys and old architecture would be perfect for such a role and there are few yuppies complaining about parking to prevent that.

  5. #35

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    This was intentional, but maybe, in far hindsight not a great decision. I forced a lot of junk onto the streets.

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    When the grid street plan was devised in 1811 they purposefully left out alleys. You'll still find a few downtown below 14th Street, but even many of those have been de-mapped (although some still exist as private right of ways).

  6. #36
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    All they needed was wider sidewalks and better vault spaces......

  7. #37
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    There used to be wider sidewalks in many areas of the city.

  8. #38
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    I know. There still are in some.

    Problem is two-fold. Many of the properties were expanded out, and a lot of the roads had much more need for travel and parking.

    There would be little problems with travel along many of these roads if it were not for the parking and delivery trucks (of which alleys would serve only a marginal purpose).

  9. #39
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    MAS Releases Report on NYC’s Garment District

    Municipal Art Society
    October 14th, 2011

    One year after our Garment District panel discussion at the 2010 MAS Summit, we’re excited to be releasing Fashioning the Future: NYC’s Garment District at the 2011 edition of the Summit, a report which is the culmination of our work on one of the fashion industry’s greatest assets – Manhattan’s Garment District.

    Today, with the re-zoning proposal, which would have significantly altered the manufacturing character of the district, off the table, it is time to acknowledge the strengths of the district, address its current needs, and plan for its future. Over the last year we have conducted case studies, gathered new data, interviewed dozens of experts, researched the history and explored a variety of policy recommendations. The recommendations detailed in the report offer a vision forward.


    Fashioning the Future: NYC’s Garment District

    Over the last year MAS has conducted case studies, gathered new data, interviewed dozens of experts, compiled other studies of the fashion industry, researched the history and explored a variety of policy recommendations. The recommendations outlined in our report flow from a careful recording of the history of the fashion industry, an examination of our competitors, and a thorough analysis of the competitive advantages of the Garment District.

    The MAS pdf REPORT can be downloaded at the LINK

  10. #40

  11. #41

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    I hope that this area is landmarked. The structures are stunning.

  12. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
    This was intentional, but maybe, in far hindsight not a great decision. I forced a lot of junk onto the streets.
    Alley vs no alley layouts have their benefits and downsides. Compare New York to Philly, for instance. Philly also has a rectilinear grid with numbered avenues, yet in between that grid, there are a lot of smaller streets and alleys. In good neighborhoods, these side streets and alleys offer majestic little corners of urbanity that are hard, if not impossible, to find in Manhattan above 14th Street. However, in bad or even average neighborhoods, these side streets often become total no-go zones. While police have difficulty maintaining safety even on the main thoroughfares in those areas, side alleys and back blocks are essentially run by their local laws and crews. I wonder how much more difficult it would've been to clean up Manhattan's crime in the 90's if it had the same alleyway situation.

  13. #43
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    A 10-Year Plan To Update and Save The Garment District

    by Jessica Dailey





    People have been trying to remake/rebrand/rebuild the Garment District for years. The rezoning, a hot topic several years ago, never came to pass, and an initiative to rename the neighborhood seems to have fizzled out. Now the Design Trust for Public Space has unveiled a 10-year plan that aims to strengthen the Garment District and update the area for today's fashion designers and manufacturers through 17 recommendations that could boost the city's revenue by $340 million. The report details how the zoning laws can be updated to fit the district's needs and retain the fashion factories, but there are also a lot of interesting, and semi-mindboggling, ideas for remaking the public space. Think parks on top of buildings and fashion shows in the streets.

    The top priority of the report, titled "Making Midtown: A New Vision for a 21st Century Garment District in New York City," is to retain the 270 factories currently operating in the Garment District and update the zoning rules to sustain the mix of uses found in the area and encourage voluntary, market-based zoning initiatives. The plan would also remake the district's public spaces and streets, create a central NYC Fashion Innovation Center, and launch a "NYC Made" branding campaign with incentives for designers.

    The fun stuff comes in the section on how to improve the public realm of the Garment District. Sidewalks would be widened and more trees would be planted. Loading docks would be transformed into pop-up shops or shows. Runway shows would take place in the public plazas or side-streets could be closed to temporarily host them. Installations along Broadway would be fashion-themed, focusing on things like custom-designed manequins. Fancy new streetlights would have crazy colors to resemble runway show lighting. But the most intriguing idea, inspired by the High Line, is to create a mid-block pedestrian walkway from 34th to 40th Streets on the top of low-rise buildings. Or, more realistically, this path would be created at street level, opening up existing arcades and spaces to the public, much like 6 1/2 Avenue.

    Of course, all of this is just a proposal, and while city officials were involved with its creation, it's unclear as to what is next. The report ominously concludes that "we must act now" to save the Garment District, but without any action from the city, nothing can really move forward.

    Making Midtown [official site]
    Making Midtown report [PDF]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/1...t_district.php

  14. #44
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    A fashion show right on 23rd street!!!!!!! (?)


    Yay?

  15. #45
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Cross street(s)?

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