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Thread: Rezoning the Garment District

  1. #46

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    Great ideas!

  2. #47

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    I love this idea:




  3. #48
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    People Really Want to Rebrand the Garment District

    by Jessica Dailey

    The Fashion Center BID is still pushing forward with its quest to rebrand and remake the Garment District into something that is not the Garment District. The Journal takes a another look at what the BID and many landlords in the neighborhood want, and at the top of their list is to get rid of the iconic button logo. Landlords want to attract tech tenants to the office space, which has cheaper rent than hipper 'hoods like Chelsea, and they want the area to be known for hotels and restaurants (of which they need more "cool" ones). "It's crazy for us to have this location in New York and have its symbol be the button, the thimble and the needle," said Tony Malkin, landlord of the Empire State Building and much more. Malkin clearly feels very strongly about a rebranding, as he's not signing any new fashion tenants in his buildings, and he said "the traditional small fashion tenant is no more."

    For the rebranding to actually happen, the neighborhood first needs to be rezoned. The current zoning laws are from 1987 and dictate that half of the 9.5 million square feet in the area be used for fashion production. The BID says that only 1.5 million square feet of that is actually used for that purpose. A rezoning has been talked about for years, but the city declined a proposal to do so in 2010, likely thanks to opposition from many high-profile people, including designer Diane von Furstenberg. Will the Fashion Center BID actually have success this time?

    Sewing Up a New Image for the Garment District [WSJ]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/1...trict.php#more

  4. #49
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Default URBAN FABRIC: Building New York's Garment District

    The Skyscraper Museum in the GARMENT DISTRICT

    URBAN FABRIC: Building New York's Garment District

    A FREE EXHIBITION at 1411 Broadway, corner of 40th St.
    August 5, 2013 - October 31, 2013

    Once home to the largest concentration of skyscraper factories in the world and more than 100,000 manufacturing jobs, New York's historic Garment District has changed dramatically in the past 50 years, but remains one of the city's most authentic neighborhoods. Constructed almost entirely in the boom decade from 1921-1931, the "Art Deco" district contains more than 125 stepped-back "loft" buildings that took the pyramidal forms dictated by the city's then-new zoning law.

    From August 5 through October 31, The Skyscraper Museum is presenting a FREE exhibition on the architecture and urban history of the Garment District in a pop-up space at 1411 Broadway. The installation reprises the exhibition The Skyscraper Museum originated last year in its lower Manhattan gallery.

    View full record of that exhibit in a virtual format.


    The guest curator for the exhibition is Andrew S. Dolkart, the James Marston Fitch Professor of Historic Preservation at Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture of Architecture, Planning and Preservation.

  5. #50

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    The GD and the area around Penn Stn should be landmarked ASAP before these greedy A-holes start razing the stunning structures there.

  6. #51

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    People Really Want to Rebrand the Garment District
    ...but not the people who actually live and work there, myself included.

  7. #52
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    The facade of the Fashion Tower is wonderful.


    Fashion Preservation Police

    A Garment District project proves more than skin-deep.

    by Steven Thomson


    GRT revived 135 West 36th Street's art deco spirit. Courtesy GRT

    Situated along Broadway between the landmark-rich Theater and Flatiron Districts, Manhattan’s Garment District represents a near preservation dead zone. As the area undergoes a large-scale revitalization, property owners are turning attention from ground floor retail to renovating the entrances and lobbies that lead to the increasingly valuable office space above. Yet without landmarking protections in place, the architectural reminders of the district’s history as a global hub for clothing design and manufacturing are in peril of being lost.

    GRT Architects sought to change this pattern with its Fashion Tower project at 135 West 36th Street, the site of an art deco-era Emery Roth skyscraper. Unlike Roth’s prestigious pre-war apartment buildings, Fashion Tower fell victim to a thoughtless 1970s facade treatment, in which a flexible, stucco-like paint was applied to the exterior. Not only acting as an ad-hoc urban lint roller, collecting grime from traffic over decades, the frontage makeover meant the loss of period ornamental motifs.



    To recover the building’s forgotten pageantry, GRT’s team embarked on a period of research at Columbia University’s Avery Library. Archival drawings and photographs, along with forensic paint analysis and insight from preservation specialists Walter B. Melvin Architects and historian Andrew Dolkart, allowed the designers to piece together the exterior entry’s original details that now match an identical freight entrance at the building’s eastern side. With terra cotta sourced from upstate New York’s Boston Valley and replica stone engravings rendered by a Brooklyn-based mason, the threshold now signals its original Garment District badges of honor: polychrome peacocks hold court above the entry, complemented above by surviving winged putti wielding shears and draping fabric. This sumptuous symbolism tells a largely untold story, as Fashion Tower stands as the only building in the district with ornamentation that references the fashion trades.



    The art deco narrative continues in the lobby through an entirely 21st-century concept. GRT Architects sheathed the double-height space with a faceted pattern of calacatta marble and bronze-tinted anodized aluminum. The interplay of silhouettes brings to mind pleated fabric as well as the soaring geometry that defined the period’s architectural style. Passage through the lobby reveals the walls’ shifting planes, enlivening the less than stimulating march toward the elevator, which is standard in this part of Midtown. The interior impact is decidedly fashion-forward, while the restored facade pays homage to styles past—a promising statement for the nascent firm’s inaugural project.

    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=7923

  8. #53

    Default Could This Deconstructivist Office Tower Be Coming to the Garment District?

    Could This Deconstructivist Office Tower Be Coming to the Garment District?
    By Ondel Hylton
    August 5th, 2015
    www.6sqft.com/could-this-deconstructivist-office-tower-be-coming-to-the-garment-district/

    The visualization wizzes at Hayes Davidson posted this image of a hyper-modern tower addition atop an imposing Verizon-owned building at 230 West 36th Street.

    While few details are provided with the accompanying image, an article from the Times last year mentioned that the top two floors and some unused development rights of the 1924 building were being shopped around to developers as a potential hotel site. The rendered building appears to be a commercial office building, however. With the dearth of development sites suitable for large office floor plates east of Ninth Avenue, and a hot Midtown South office market where vacancy rates hover near 9 percent, the site could be a prime opportunity to construct new office space in the heart of the Times Square/Penn Station sub-market.




    More info and images in the post here.

  9. #54
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    It's all very well that it may look pretty snazzy on the outside, but it's been compared to 170 Amsterdam Avenue, which is residential and has this kind of view (blech!!!):





    http://www.cityrealty.com/nyc/lincol...ery=170+amster

    At least as an office building, perhaps it's not so bad, but some windows will basically be superfluous.

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