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Thread: Proposed - The New South Street Seaport - by SHoP Architects

  1. #136

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    ^^ Agreed. Would it be a fair compromise to build this tower and knock down Southbridge Towers? GGP could resettle the blue-hairs in the new building. Southbridge is a tower-in-the-park nightmare. One of the city's worst buildings and second only to the Verizon building in what I dream about knocking down in that end of town. A truly awful, suburban monument to how unhinged some people were in the 60s and 70s.

    What a great blank canvas we'd have if we could get rid of Southbridge and Stuy Town/Peter Cooper Village...

  2. #137

    Default The New Seaport

    I read the article posted below, it seems there is still some possibility of this project going forward, thats good news. In terms of appearances alone, I think the tower design is great; one either likes the SHop aesthetic, or they don't - I generally like all their projects.

    Paul

  3. #138
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    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/11/18/commission-rejects-seaport-redevelopment-plan/


    Landmarks Panel Snubs Seaport Project

    By David W. Dunlap A majority of Landmarks Preservation Commission members indicated they could not support a plan, shown in this rendering, to remake the South Street Seaport with a new tower (with an exoskeleton), new hotel, center, and a relocated Tin Building, at the end of the pier. (Rendering: SHoP Architects)
    An ambitious and much-debated plan to redevelop the low-rise South Street Seaport with a 42-story apartment and hotel, among other new and relocated buildings around Pier 17, was largely rebuffed on Tuesday by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

    Eventually, the plummeting economy might have reshaped the redevelopment proposal by General Growth Properties, based in Chicago, which itself faces an uncertain future. But the landmarks commission got to it first.
    Without taking a vote, a majority of the commissioners made it clear at a hearing that they believed the massing, scale and height of the proposed new buildings would be out of character with the 19th-century riverfront historic district, said a spokeswoman for the commission, Elisabeth de Bourbon. They further objected to General Growth’s proposal to relocate the historical Tin Building to the end of Pier 17 from its original site on South Street.
    General Growth issued a statement late in the day saying it was undaunted and even encouraged by the “thoughtful comments” of the commission members, not all of which were negative. Absent a vote, the application is still considered active.
    “Whenever a new project takes place in an historic district, a responsible developer must hear the concerns of those charged with the task of preserving it,” said Benjamin M. Branham, a spokesman for the company in New York.
    He added, “We remain committed to our plan to revitalize the seaport district, add necessary amenities and open space, and respect the unique historical character of this cherished neighborhood.”
    The redevelopment plan — a mix of stores, hotel rooms, apartments and new open space — was strongly favored by the Bloomberg administration and a number of downtown civic leaders when it was unveiled in June. Renderings by SHoP Architects, the designers of the project, showed a 495-foot tower, clad in a terra cotta exoskeleton, rising on new pilings in the East River.
    Under the proposal, a 1980s mall on Pier 17 would have been replaced with two-story retail buildings, a four- and six-story hotel, walkways, a plaza, and the refurbished and relocated Tin Building. The tower would have stood immediately to the west.
    But within 24 hours of its unveiling, the plan ran into strong opposition. Councilman Alan J. Gerson — reflecting what he said were strongly negative comments from his constituents in Lower Manhattan — declared that the plan was “certainly not going to pass in its present form.”
    General Growth has controlled the retail complex at the seaport since 2004, when it bought the Rouse Company, the original developers in 1985. Rouse had intended Pier 17 and the upland buildings to be a “festival marketplace” along the lines of its popular Faneuil Hall project in Boston.
    Last summer, General Growth’s stated goal was “to change what the South Street Seaport means in New Yorkers’ minds,” Michael H. McNaughton, a vice president, said at the time. “It is going to change dramatically from a place where people in tourist buses buy Yankee T-shirts and bonsai trees.”
    But Stephen F. Byrns, a member of the landmarks commission, said he went down to the seaport last Saturday and was struck by the vibrant scene there, having been prepared to see a failing mall.
    “I did not see this as a struggling asset,” he said. “It reminded me of how incredibly important this historic district is.”

  4. #139
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    From Crain's


    South Street Seaport renovation plans criticized

    The Landmarks Preservation Commission said the size and scale of General Growth Properties' plan is inconsistent with the character of the site.

    Adrianne Pasquarelli
    The Landmarks Preservation Commission at a meeting on Tuesday criticized mall owner General Growth Properties’ plan to rebuild the South Street Seaport.

    At Tuesday's follow-up meeting to last moth's public hearing, commission members said they believe that the plan is inappropriate to the South Street Historic District. The size and scale of the new buildings are inconsistent with the character and history of the site. A formal vote has not yet been scheduled.

    General Growth said in a statement, “Whenever a new project takes place in an historic district, a responsible developer must hear the concerns of those charged with the task of preserving it. It’s a critical part of the approval process, and we thank the commissioners for their thoughtful comments and dialogue. We remain committed to our plan to revitalize the seaport district, add necessary amenities and open space, and respect the unique historical character of this cherished neighborhood,” General Growth said in a statement.

    General Growth, one of the nation’s largest mall operators, planned to revive the dilapidated Seaport by financing a massive refurbishing with fresh retail, residential and hotel space, all designed by SHoP Architects. The plan called for the razing of the existing Pier 17 mall, developed in the 1980s, and the construction of a 42-story waterfront hotel tower, a boutique hotel and two-story retail sites. The project includes about 400,000 square feet of retail space, 175,000 square feet of residential space, 32,000 square feet of community space, and 280,000 feet of hotel space.

    SHoP’s prior projects include the Meatpacking District’s Porter House, a modern apartment building made of zinc. The firm beat several other architecture agencies vying for the Seaport project.

    General Growth inherited the Seaport site from the Rouse Co. four years ago, but has not disclosed the estimated cost of the proposed redevelopment, a project viewed by many as overly ambitious. In recent months, the mall owner has suffered its share of fallout resulting from the dire retail situation impacting malls across the country, and is said to be unable to repay large loans due in a few months.

    The company’s stock price has plummeted nearly 99% in the last 12 months, from near $46 last November to a current price of $0.47, about the cost of an apple.

  5. #140
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    New Seaport Owner Revives Development Talks

    Howard Hughes Corp., the new owner of the South Street Seaport, is discussing its options with the city and SHoP Architects.

    By Julie Shapiro


    Any redevelopment of the South Street Seaport would likely involve tearing down the Pier 17 mall. (Flickr/Wallyg)

    SOUTH STREET SEAPORT — Many downtown residents breathed a sign of relief when South Street Seaport owner General Growth Properties declared bankruptcy in 2009 and put its controversial development plans on hold.

    But those plans, or something similar, could now be making a comeback.

    The new owner of the Seaport, a General Growth spinoff called Howard Hughes Corp., has begun speaking with city agencies and SHoP Architects about options for redoing the property, a SHoP member said.

    Corie Sharples, principal at SHoP, said the firm has not done any "physical work" for Howard Hughes but has attended meetings with them.

    "They’re proceeding very, very cautiously," Sharples said. "They’re talking with the city before doing anything else."

    SHoP Architects designed General Growth’s original 2008 plan to raze the Pier 17 mall and build a hotel and retail complex anchored by a 500-foot tower.

    Local residents were concerned about the height of the tower and worried that the upscale development would shut out the community. General Growth proposed several givebacks to assuage those concerns, including a community center and a school.

    The plan had strong support from the city Economic Development Corp., which owns the Seaport property, but it hit a snag at the city Landmarks Preservation Commission.

    In November 2008, Landmarks commissioners slammed the project, calling the design “inappropriate” for the South Street Seaport Historic District. Commissioners also raised concerns about General Growth’s plan to move the historic Tin Building from the base of the pier to its tip.

    The commissioners did not vote on the plan, but they suggested that General Growth revise it.

    However, General Growth was struggling under $27 billion in debt and soon saw its stock price fall below 50 cents a share. In April 2009, before returning to the LPC with revised plans, General Growth declared bankruptcy and put all development on hold.

    General Growth officially emerged from bankruptcy earlier this fall, after splitting into two companies. GGP retained more than 180 malls across the country, while the spinoff Howard Hughes Corp. — bolstered by investments from Pershing Square Capital, Brookfield Asset Management and others — took over the properties with development potential, including the Seaport.

    Howard Hughes Corp. has not spoken publicly about plans for the Seaport, and the company’s staff has not responded to Community Board 1’s request that they attend a public meeting, the board’s staff said.

    A Howard Hughes spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20101216/down...#ixzz18MgEwY8d

  6. #141

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    I happen to like the Pier 17 mall as a work of architecture. Am I alone on that?

  7. #142

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    Yeah it's a dump. Rip it down and put up the high rise.

  8. #143

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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    It may be Disney assemblage, but the townscape is harmonious.

  9. #144
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The real problem is that there's not enough plaza area integrated into uses for visitors -- tables, places to comfortably hang out, etc. There are some steps and lots of bare wood, but it mainly serves for people to walk around somewhat aimlessly.

  10. #145

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    Pier 17, despite all of its setbacks, is one of the most popular pubic spaces in Lower Manhattan. It baffles me why someone would be in such a hurry to demolish something that's not only a popular resident and visitor destination, but is also probably quite a cash cow, due to its incredibly high visitor turnover. Sure, it can be something of a tourist trap, but if we follow this train of thought, we must demolish the Empire State Building as well. How could the city tolerate such a kitchy attraction, surrounded by obnoxious tourists for many blocks around, available on low-res postcards at 10 for a buck, with the building's plastic likeness, adorned with a plastic King Kong, sold at every other corner? This travesty must be demolished and replaced with appropriate "contemporary architecture" designed by some flavor-of-the-month starchitect. After we're done there, let's move on to that horribly cliched and tourist-infested Rockefeller Center and allow true progressives like Kaufman and Chang to redevelop the site to its full potential.

  11. #146
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    I could see cutting into a piece of it for a high-rise (on the north side).

    Pier 17 could use a little reno inside, but overall it's worth saving. It looks good on the skyline, and tourists love the views of the bridges from the pier.

    Also, if it's torn down, financing could run out again and we'd be stuck with a vacant lot on the water, which would be worst of all.

  12. #147
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeCom View Post

    ... It baffles me why someone would be in such a hurry to demolish something that's not only a popular resident and visitor destination, but is also probably quite a cash cow, due to its incredibly high visitor turnover.
    Do locals really use it for anything but an occasional stroll to the river's edge or as a place to jump on the ferry? No doubt the changes along the river walk (soon to open) will help the area, but most folks I know avoid it like the plague.

    And shops there have been shuttering over the past couple of years. Seems it's failed as a shopping mall, partly due to the fact that the entire north side is about as hospitable as a junk yard.

  13. #148
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Nice render of the Seaport Plan from 2008, with a different version of Gehry rising in the background ...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	NewSeaport1.jpg 
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ID:	11669

  14. #149

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    Them #@*$&* pesky tourists: they should take their money back to Arkansas.

  15. #150
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    No, let them spend their money here. But they could be offered a better experience than what's now at the SSS.

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