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Thread: Proposed - The New South Street Seaport - by SHoP Architects

  1. #211

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    The pier itself was good with excellent views (how could it not?), but the building was a depressing, dated mall. No connection to the area, or even to the pier.

    Natives avoided it, and it was developing a carnival atmosphere.

    Quite a difference from the simple Pier 15.

  2. #212
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Plan to Redevelop South Street Seaport Includes Marina and 50-Story Tower


    SHoP Architects
    A rendering of a proposal by the Howard Hughes Corporation, which seeks to add a marina and more to South Street Seaport.


    NY TIMES
    By CHARLES V BAGLI
    November 18, 2013

    South Street Seaport, an often-neglected corner of Manhattan dedicated to enshrining New York’s seafaring past, has been battered by storms, recessions and poor management.

    Now, there is a proposal for a major redevelopment of the cobblestone streets, 19th-century brick buildings and piers that would include the reconstruction of the landmark Tin Building and the addition of a marina and a 50-story hotel and apartment tower.

    The Howard Hughes Corporation, which controls the seaport under a lease with the city, says it wants to enliven the area and establish a destination for both tourists and New Yorkers.

    It is unclear how a glassy tower on the north side of Pier 17 would fit into the historical fabric of the area, but Howard Hughes contends that the building would be the “economic engine” that would allow for the rehabilitation of the crumbling piers and nearby buildings.

    The proposal, the company said, will include a still-to-be-determined rescue plan for the financially ailing Seaport Museum, and the sailing ships at Pier 17, which are slowly sinking into the East River.

    “The re-envisioned seaport district will transform the piers’ iconic waterfront setting into a vibrant, highly engaging area,” said David R. Weinreb, chief executive of Howard Hughes, “while providing a critical catalyst for the revitalization of Lower Manhattan.”

    The company is to unveil its preliminary plan for the first time on Tuesday to local residents and members of Community Board 1, which includes the seaport.

    Howard Hughes, which would triple the size of its operations, had hoped to continue negotiating in secret with the city’s Economic Development Corporation while it completed its proposal. But demands by local officials and residents for a more open design process forced the company to make the plans public.

    The company’s proposal must be approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission and the City Council before construction can start.
    Catherine M. Hughes, chairwoman of Community Board 1, said she was glad to finally see the developer’s master plan, which appears to have met many of the community’s concerns. “We understand that in order for it to succeed and provide community amenities it needs to be economically viable,” she said.

    But Robert LaValva, who has run the New Amsterdam Market, a monthly bazaar that includes food-oriented entrepreneurs and purveyors at the seaport, is worried that the developer might rupture the “coherence and integrity of the historic district.”

    Howard Hughes, for instance, wants to demolish the vacant and dilapidated New Market Building on the north side of Pier 17 so that it can build the hotel and apartment tower. “That’s the one and only existing historic building that connects the land to the waterfront,” he said.

    Councilwoman Gale A. Brewer, who was recently elected Manhattan borough president and will take office in January, said she had reservations about the height of the apartment tower.

    Before Howard Hughes, General Growth Properties controlled the lease at the Seaport and in 2008 initiated its own plan for redeveloping the area, including a 42-story apartment tower. That plan was rejected by the landmarks commission before the company went into bankruptcy.

    Mr. Weinreb said that it would cost about $125 million to rebuild the rotting wooden piers and dismantle and rebuild the Tin Building, which must be moved about 30 feet to the east and raised to meet new waterfront standards.

    Local streets would be extended to the piers in order to reintegrate the seaport into the surrounding neighborhood and preserve the views of the Brooklyn Bridge. The company would also build a marina between the apartment building and the Brooklyn Bridge.

    But Howard Hughes is taking a very different approach than that taken by the Rouse Corporation in the 1980s, when it opened a “festival marketplace” in the historic district, hoping to attract tourists and suburban residents back to the city.

    Now the city is awash in tourists, and the residential population downtown has swelled to 60,000.

    “Like it or not, the whole city is a festival market now,” said Gregg Pasquarelli, a principal at SHoP Architects, who is working on the plan for Howard Hughes. “We want to get New Yorkers to come to the seaport, where there’ll be unique shops and history. The tourists will come anyway.”

  3. #213

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    Wow, when it comes to the East Side, Gregg the P in SHoP keeps thinking up ways of crapping up both sides of the FDR Drive.

  4. #214

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    I can already hear tenants in Southbridge Towers mobilizing to save their views...err, I mean to save the Seaport.

    Wow, when it comes to the East Side, Gregg the P in SHoP keeps thinking up ways of crapping up both sides of the FDR Drive.
    Well, the East River Park Shop designed is quite nice but I do prefer their previous design for this project. Seems NY projects have a hard time culminating their buildings into anything but a flat top. Shameful, considering the graceful skyline of yesteryear that we were so renowned for.
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  5. #215
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    That's a really inappropriate place to put a tower. Put it on the mainland, to the south. A tower on the site as shown will kill views of the Brooklyn Bridge, a key component of the Seaport area.

    And how does the proposed Seaport City, with it's big protective levees keeping the river out, fit into this plan?

    NYC really needs some good comprehensive urban planning. Enough with this piecemeal infill and outfill.

  6. #216

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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    Well, the East River Park Shop designed is quite nice but I do prefer their previous design for this project. Seems NY projects have a hard time culminating their buildings into anything but a flat top. Shameful, considering the graceful skyline of yesteryear that we were so renowned for.
    I was talking about this: http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showth...l=1#post434257

    But it looks like they have their sick hands up and down the waterfront

  7. #217

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    Yea, I know and don't forget their Domino plan on the other side though they are only designing two of those towers.

  8. #218
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    That's a really inappropriate place to put a tower.
    They're calling it "The Gotham Goiter"

  9. #219

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    This is a nice tower. It reminds me of a tall version of the original 5 Franklin Pl

  10. #220
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    Looks nice. Brown again, SHoP sure loves brown, Barclays Center, Domino, 290 Mulberry, JDS East River towers, 111 W57 and now this one.

  11. #221

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    Brown is a nice robust color. Combine it with other greenery projects, maybe even a rooftop garden, and their projects look like one huge planter.

  12. #222
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The head of Howard Hughes Corporation faced off with the locals tonight at CB2 Seaport Committee get together.

    I'm not calling him an arrogant prick. But he resembles one.

    It takes big cajones to retain the name of a paranoid whacko as the identity of your company.

  13. #223
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    Im digging the brown, it exudes a quality of depth that eludes glass facades. Barclays facade is amazing, patinas should be utilized more often. But can they please employ as much grace in the towers culmination; I know NYC has sunk a long way in terms of skyline but at least make an attempt.

  14. #224

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    Quote Originally Posted by EastMillinocket View Post
    Wow, when it comes to the East Side, Gregg the P in SHoP keeps thinking up ways of crapping up both sides of the FDR Drive.
    AMEN. That should be placed on a billboard and installed up and down the FDR.

    Between SHoP's ungainly towers in the park planned for the ConEd site (a MUCH worse design vs. Richard Meier's), SHoP's Domino redevelopment design (a hideous pastiche of clownish towers in the park, much worse than the urban, dense and contextual earlier design by Raphael Vinoly), and this, SHoP is nearing Gene Kaufman territory for the number of turds they are leaving around the city.

    Their modus operandi seems to be replacing a good, dense design by another architect with a bunch of freakish towers in the park ranging from awkward to utterly bizarre and serving as the modern-day counterpart to the the tower-in-the-park housing projects of the 1960s.

  15. #225

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    Greg P at shoP was a banking executive at Citicorp before changing his career to Architecture: so it is no surprise to me that 'economics' - not aesthetics- often drives the design decisions over at shoP......

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