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Thread: Clinton / Hell's Kitchen Development

  1. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    I remember reading about that...oh yes, here it is.
    Amazing: good find though!

  2. #92
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    Plan to remodel Dyer Ave. would ease traffic, add parks

    by Diane Vacca


    The proposal also includes the elimination of vehicle traffic in the northbound lanes of Dyer Ave. between 34th and 35th Sts.
    (seen in far left of photo, where car is shown), which would be converted to park space.



    The proposed elimination of an on-ramp that allows southbound traffic from Ninth Ave. to access the Lincoln Tunnel
    (shown at right, just west of Ninth Ave. between 37th and 36th Sts.), would nearly double the amount of green space slated for 36th St. (shown at left).


    The concrete labyrinth of access ramps that snake under and through the streets of Hell’s Kitchen connecting to the Lincoln Tunnel will make room for trees, grass and park benches while also improving traffic conditions in the area, according to a new plan being floated by Community Board 4.

    The myriad cars, trucks and buses that wind through the neighborhood and make life for pedestrians difficult would circulate in new patterns that could yield up to 27,800 square feet of parkland and relieve congestion as well. The board’s transportation committee discussed aspects of the proposal at its meeting on Wed., Jan. 20.

    Dyer Ave., which runs north and south from 30th to 42nd Sts. between Ninth and 10th Aves., is an integral part of this maze. Contrary to expectations, when its two northbound lanes between 34th and 35th Sts. were closed for repaving last fall, everyone noticed that the traffic flow in the area improved. Consequently, one northbound lane remains permanently closed, and the other continues to be closed during peak hours.

    In view of this development, the Board 4’s transportation committee would like to have both these northbound lanes permanently closed to traffic. Doing so would not only continue to tame the flow of traffic, but also yield a bonus of 6,000 square feet that could be inexpensively converted to green space and is conveniently located next to large residential buildings. The southbound lanes would remain open and operational.

    The most radical and innovative of the committee’s proposals, however, is the elimination of the semi-circular Ramp C between 36th and 37th Sts., which connects to the Lincoln Tunnel. The ramp, which accommodates the southbound traffic on Ninth Ave., winds west around a large residential building until it meets Dyer Ave., where it heads north and merges with northbound tunnel traffic.

    Instead, the committee wants to extend that loop by having vehicles continue down Ninth Ave. past the on-ramp, turn right on 35th St. toward Dyer Ave., then turn right on the avenue and continue north to the tunnel.

    The benefits from this change would be manifold, according to the committee, as tunnel traffic on Ninth Ave. should ease somewhat with roughly another block and a half to queue before turning. More important, traffic would flow easily onto Dyer Ave. without the need to merge, because no traffic would be heading north on the closed section of the avenue between 34th and 35th Sts. The merge of the current ramp and the below-grade access route, a source of bottlenecking, would also be eliminated.

    Furthermore, the soon-to-be-created 36th St. “Greenstreet Island Park” would no longer be sandwiched between eastbound traffic on 36th St. and tunnel traffic on Ramp C directly behind it. Better still, the space vacated by the newly emptied ramp, which abuts the mini-park, could be incorporated into the green “canoe”—nearly doubling its size from 9,730 to 17,200 square feet.

    The redirection of tunnel traffic away from 36th St., a residential block, to 35th St., where cars would pass between a parking lot on the north side of the street and commercial property on the south side, also provides safety benefits to the area.

    “No ramps belong on residential streets—we’re not through-highways,” said committee member Martin Treat. “One thing the Port Authority hasn’t done is pay attention to the queues in our neighborhood,” he continued. “They pay more attention to backed-up traffic in New Jersey.”

    Although the board has been discussing these ideas with both the city Department of Transportation and the Port Authority of NY/NJ, only the island park on 36th St. will definitely come to fruition this year. The DOT has agreed to green the “canoe,” as the area is informally called, which will include the parking lane on the north side of 36th St. Last month the board asked the DOT for a pedestrian crossing at the ramp entrance so that pedestrians walking down the west side of Ninth Ave. would be able to reach the new green space without first having to cross to the east side of the avenue. The DOT hasn’t approved the request and is unlikely to do so while Ramp C remains in use, acknowledged committee co-chairperson Christine Berthet.

    Now the committee will ask that Dyer Ave.’s northbound lanes be permanently closed between 34th and 35th Sts. It will further request that both the Port Authority and the DOT study its plan for eliminating Ramp C and redirecting traffic to 35th St. and Dyer Ave.

    “This is a win-win,” added Berthet. “Everybody has more space.”

    http://www.chelseanow.com/articles/2...9267929613.txt

  3. #93

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    "Studio City" project of 1,350 apartments approved for Clinton


    February 09, 2010 By Carter B. Horsley


    The City Planning Commission last month approved several zoning applications for the redevelopment of 44th and 45th Streets, Eleventh Avenue and a line 125 west of Tenth Avenue.

    The development is known as Studio City and is a project of the Gotham Organization, which is headed by Joel Picket.

    It is planned to contain about 1,350 apartments of which at least 600 would be affordable to low- and moderate-income families, a new 630-seat public school that would be constructed by the School Construction Authority, 10,800 square feet of retail space, and parking for up to 204 cars.

    The approvals included a special permit to develop over a railroad right-of-way.

    The site is now occupied by the 276-seat PS 51, a two-story stable for carriage horses, a vacant, one-story, 10,000-square-foot warehouse, a 13,000-square-foot public parking lot, and a 60,000-square-foot, 300-space public parking lot.

    The site had not been zoned for residential uses.

    In addition to the new school, the project calls for several residential buildings of varying heights including a tower on Eleventh Avenue, a mid-block building and the "railroad-cut" buildings. The Eleventh Avenue tower would consist of a 31-story tower with a C-shaped, 7-story base. It would contain 80 percent market-rate apartments and 20 percent affordable units.

    The mid-block building would have a 14-story tower setback over a nine-story street wall on 45th Street and a seven-story street wall on 44th Street. All of its units would be affordable and all of the units in the converted former PS 51 building on the site would be market-rate.

    The "railroad-cut" buildings would rise 14-stories on a platform and would contain affordable apartments.

    The project will contain 28,596 square feet of open space, about 3,600 more than required.

    In 2001, the commission approved a "Studio City" television studio production facility with 700,000 square feet on the site, but it was not built.

    The new zoning for the site was unanimously approved by Community Board 4 October 7, 2009.

    http://www.cityrealty.com/new-york-c...-clinton/30422

    Copyright © 1994-2010 CITY REALTY.COM INC.
    Last edited by brianac; February 10th, 2010 at 04:18 AM.

  4. #94
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    Coming Attractions Roll for Hell's Kitchen Megadevelopment

    February 9, 2010, by Pete








    (click to enlarge)

    Remember those crazy days when wildly ambitious projects were cooked up and revealed by developers on a daily basis? The credit crunch put an abrupt halt to all that, but wait, here's a leftover! It's a proposed 1,350-unit, 1.15-million-square-foot mixed-use development from our friends at the Gotham Organization, intended for a big chunk of land bounded by Tenth and Eleventh Avenues and West 44th and 45th Streets. The proposal received approval from the City Planning Commission on January 27 for the necessary rezoning, putting the project, dare we say, on track for construction. The multi-building design, called Studio City, is a staggered group of glass and brick from SLCE Architects, the centerpiece of which is a 31-story tower along Eleventh Avenue with retail at the base and apartments above.

    Between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues, where the empty Shamrock Stables now stand, a 14-story section with affordable housing will extend north-south through the site. On West 45th Street, the five-story PS 51 will be converted to residential use, and a new school and playground—expanding capacity from 276 to 630 students—will be constructed along West 44th Street. At the east end of the site a platform will be built over the exposed Amtrak railroad cut and two 14-story residential sections separated by a landscaped open space will go up, all backing onto the full-block Hess gas station along Tenth Avenue.

    It's a bit of a no-man's-land, but the Studio City site sits within a hot development corridor, including Silver Towers, Clinton Park and the new Ink48 hotel (formerly known as the Vu Hotel). The spot has been eyed by developers for years, and back in 2002 a different proposal from the Meridian Group for Studio City as a big TV and Film production facility was in the works, but not much beyond the name moved forward. Then in 2008 Gotham proposed their development with plans to rise 44 stories over Eleventh Avenue, but the height met with community opposition. The project was downsized to the current 31 floors. Complaints aside, the neighborhood folks did succeed in getting a bigger school plus a batch of housing "for all income groups." Of the 1,350 residential units going in, 675 will be classified as "affordable." And a fund of $35M will be created to bankroll the school and the affordable housing initiatives. The environmental review still requires approval from the City Council and the mayor's office, but the architects proclaim that "construction in phases is scheduled to commence in 2010." Wishful thinking?

    Projects - Studio City [SLCE Architects]
    West 44th Street and Eleventh Avenue Rezoning Proposal [nyc.gov]
    It Happened One Weekend: Homeless Hell's Kitchen Horses! [Curbed]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2010/02/0...pment.php#more

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    Griffin Court Arrives in Hell's Kitchen With iPads & Cabanas!

    February 11, 2010, by Joey






    (click to enlarge)

    Location: 800 Tenth Avenue, btwn 53rd/54th Streets
    Size: Two eight-story buildings with 95 studio- to three-bedroom condos
    Prices: $735,000 to $3.86 million
    Architect: FXFowle
    Developer: Alchemy Properties
    Sales & Marketing: Alchemy Properties

    Lowdown: Would you believe that our last seven Development Du Jours have all been in Harlem or Williamsburg/Greenpoint? Well, in what could be an early sign of confidence returning to the market (or maybe just a rolling of the dice), a developer is launching a new project in a non-"fringe" neighborhood—and they're coming prepared! Griffin Court launches sales on March 9, but a soft-opening for brokers and buyers is happening right now. Buyers and their brokers who sign contracts by the end of March will each get a choice of a free iPad or a 42" flat-screen TV. Oh, and Alchemy is covering city and state transfer taxes as well as the dreaded Mansion Tax for the first 15 buyers. So those are the door prizes, but what about the actual building?

    Griffin Court is actually two buildings, creating lots of wall space along Tenth Avenue that will be filled by a work of art yet to be determined (we hear an announcement is coming in the next month or two). The development's flashy centerpiece is its residents-only, two-story, 8,700-square-foot courtyard, which looks like some sort of extreme adventure course in renderings but will no doubt be perfect for chillaxing once finished.

    As for the 95 units, they range in size from 636 square feet to 1,829 square feet. The innards veer towards the high end, including mahogany-stained oak floors, limestone and marble bathrooms (with radiant-heated flooring), Poggenpohl cabinetry and appliances from Bosch and Viking.

    Building amenities include 24-hour concierge, gym, a storage space for each unit and a "sophisticated video-intercom system." Some residences include balconies or big terraces, and there are private rooftop cabanas available for purchase. We can't help but imagine that if the residents of Hell's Kitchen could have always retired to private cabanas after a long day, then West Side Story would have a much happier ending.

    Griffin Court [griffincourtcondo.com]
    Mural Contest Offers Ray of Hope, Kitsch to Hell's Kitchen [Curbed]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2010/02/1...ds_cabanas.php

  6. #96

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    Quote Originally Posted by brianac View Post
    "Studio City" project of 1,350 apartments approved for Clinton


    February 09, 2010 By Carter B. Horsley


    The City Planning Commission last month approved several zoning applications for the redevelopment of 44th and 45th Streets, Eleventh Avenue and a line 125 west of Tenth Avenue.

    The development is known as Studio City and is a project of the Gotham Organization, which is headed by Joel Picket.
    I see that Shamrock Stables were given Eviction Notices last week, and as this project seems to be on the way I wonder if it should now have it's own thread.

    MODS what do you think?

  7. #97
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    Default Travel Inn, 42nd Street and 10th Avenue

    Hell's Kitchen to become home of city's first gay boutique hotel, complete with major dance club

    By Michael Pantelidis and Samuel Goldsmith


    A $20 million renovation will transform the Travel Inn at 42nd St. and 10th Ave into New York City's
    first gay boutique hotel, with a dance club, a spa, a restaurant, a café and shops.


    Developers hope to open the city's first gay boutique hotel - and a major new dance club - in Hell's Kitchen.

    "In the old days there were straight hotels, and operators decided to make them gay- friendly," said Ian Reiser, head of Parkview Developers, the firm behind the plan. "I'm taking that concept and turning it upside down."

    "It's going to be called 'The Out N.Y.C.' Like, 'Come out! Let's go out and play!'" he said.

    Reiser and his work and life partner, Mati Weiderpass, plan a $20 million renovation of the Travel Inn at 42nd St. and 10th Ave. to created their 123-room hotel, which also will have a spa, a restaurant, a café and shops.

    Travel experts say targeting a hotel to gays is a smart business move.

    "This is a huge untapped market," said Tom Roth of Community Marketing, a gay and lesbian market-research company.

    "Gays and lesbians travel much more often than their straight counterparts, and New York City is the No. 1 destination for gay people in North America."

    One of the keys to the hotel's success may be the planned 10,000-square-foot, 750-patron dance club. Reiser and Weiderpass are working with gay nightlife king John Blair, who holds the cabaret license for the old xl nightclub that closed several years ago on W.16thSt. in Chelsea, the Gay City News reported.

    The Business Licenses and Permits Committee of Community Board 4 recently okayed the project, and the full board will vote in two weeks. That okay is seen as crucial to getting the necessary state and local consents.

    Neighbors generally welcomed the plan.

    "I think it's a great idea. It will add a lot of color and spice to the area," said April Schoenfeld, a 20-year-old student who lives nearby.


  8. #98
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    Doesn't look right at all.

    Hell's Kitchen Building Gets Some Extra Toppings


    February 24, 2010, by Pete













    In search of a cozy place with a view of plenty of new towers rising? An old bit of tawny brick at 411 West 39th Street might do the trick. Sitting along the ramps to the Port Authority Bus Terminal, this five-story walk-up just had two floors added on top, making for six full-floor apartments with room for retail below. The sixth-floor unit, measuring about 1,300-square-feet, has a terraces facing south at what one day should be Hudson Yards, and another to the north looking Related's tower going up at 440 West 42nd Street. What does the future hold for our Hellish friend?

    The owner here is the Meskouris clan, who have four other buildings at the northwest corner of West 39th Street and Ninth Avenue. Nothing here is listed yet, but bargain-priced rentals are found in other Meskouris buildings on the block, and they might give some indication of what's in store when #411 hits the market. At the corner is the HK Restaurant, started by a younger Meskouris a few years back. Restaurants are in the family's blood: They're the proprietors of the Jackson Hole burger joints found around town, most notably at the classic Airline Diner in Queens, where a gang of Goodfellas grabbed themselves some goodies that fell off the back of a truck. Some links to other family properties with rentals to spare:

    407 West 39th Street [StreetEasy]
    523 Ninth Avenue [StreetEasy]
    525 Ninth Avenue [StreetEasy]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2010/02/2...pings.php#more

  9. #99

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    Mural Promises to Give Hell's Kitchen What it Needs: Trees



    Even before condo development Griffin Court arrived at 800 Tenth Avenue, developer Alchemy Properties was thinking about how to decorate the place. Their answer to this question? Giant murals on two of the complex's exterior walls, with the artist chosen in a contest. And now, a few months after Griffin Court's sales began, Alchemy has found its winner: Brooklyn artist Corinne Ulmann, whose design "depicts a pattern of trees using variations of light and shadow intended to evoke the building's 8,700-square-foot private courtyard and the nearby DeWitt Clinton Park." Painting starts this week and will take about 10 days. Will anyone look away from their new iPads and flat screens long enough to catch a glimpse of this thing going up?

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...eeds_trees.php

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    More Housing May Come to Hell’s Kitchen — But Strip Clubs Can Stay

    New zoning could bring more apartments to Clinton's western sections, but the city won't be kicking out the strip clubs.

    By Tara Kyle


    Larry Flynt's Hustler Club is one of the 'adult' businesses currently operating within the proposed rezoning area.


    HELL'S KITCHEN — New zoning could bring more apartments to Manhattan's west side, but planners are making space for neighboring strip clubs.

    About 80 neighborhood residents attended a hearing Thursday night to learn more about the West Clinton Rezoning, which would cover 18 blocks between 43rd and 55th Streets.

    One of the goals of the proposed rezoning, city planner Erika Selke explained Thursday, is to open up new residential opportunities on the East side of Eleventh Avenue — putting some apartments within 500 feet of venues like Larry Flynt's Hustler Club and the Penthouse Executive Club, which are scattered along the blocks adjacent to the Hudson River.

    That's something the city ordinarily doesn't allow. But for First Amendment reasons, strip clubs that are already legally operating by the time the new zoning goes into effect would be allowed to stay, according to Selke.


    The proposed rezoning is bounded by
    43rd and 55th Streets and Twelfth Avenue.
    On the East, it skirts between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues.


    Before any proposed rezoning is approved, it must go through a seven-month public review period, formally known as the Uniform Land Use Review Process (ULURP). Thursday's hearing, hosted by Community Board 4, served as an early step in that process.

    Other goals for the proposed rezoning, which is the culmination of four years of dialogue between CB4, the Department of City Planning, residents and business owners, include allowing continued manufacturing development between Eleventh and Twelfth Avenue and maintaining the aesthetic character of the neighborhood.

    One major outcome of the West Clinton Rezoning would be the imposition of height limits, in an area where developers can currently construct towers of unlimited height.

    It would also prohibit hotels from moving onto the blocks between Eleventh and Twelfth Avenues — a popular cause in the neighborhood.

    The rezoning would promote affordable housing by allowing developers to propose higher density buildings if they're making 20 percent of their units affordable — though these don't necessarily have to be on site.

    At Thursday's hearing, residents praised many of the terms of the proposed rezoning. CB4 members said it achieved the vast majority of the goals they had laid out in discussions dating from 2006.

    But many said that they remained disheartened by a lack of anti-harassment protections for people living between Eleventh and Twelfth Avenues. On blocks where anti-harassment provisions are in place, landlords with proven cases of tenant harassment on their records face steep penalties, including being prevented from performing renovations.

    The recent influx of luxury development in the neighborhood remains a sore point for many long-time residents, who say landlords are now financially motivated to pressure them to leave.

    "We've been here, we stuck it out…when Hell's Kitchen was a description of this place and not just a cute name," said born-and-raised New Yorker Dave Novoa. "If it wasn't for us, this place would look like Detroit."

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20110128/chel...#ixzz1CNdxcedq

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    Hell's Kitchen Rezoning Proposal Outlined

    Neighborhood learns of City Planning's plan to merge community with new uses.

    Tom Stoelker


    Boundaries of rezoned area in Hell's Kitchen

    The Department of City Planning (DCP) made a presentation for the Land Use Committee of Community Board 4 in Manhattan Thursday evening. Through a hybrid organization, the committee worked with DCP for three years to compile a zoning framework that attempts to merge community concerns with new uses. The proposed district is bound by 43rd Street to the south and 55th Street to the north and sits between 11th and 12th avenues. The area, once filled with manufacturing and shipping, is now home to the studios, offices and showrooms for John Stewart, Ogilvy and Mather, Prada and Kenneth Cole.

    While fashionable firms have moved west of 11th Avenue, the area still houses large facilities for ConEd, Verizon and FedEx. As many of these companies service the high density of Midtown, new regulations seek to maintain the commercial, manufacturing and industrial uses. East of 11th, however, new zoning would push the commercial border west and allow for residential, community facilities, and retail to move in. A bit further east a preservation area would be extended. Hotel uses will be eliminated throughout the zone and no new adult entertainment would be able to open for business. For cars driving south down 11th Avenue a clear divide might emerge: commercial operations to the right and residences to the left. The divide prompted several in the audience to refer to the west side of the corridor as "a wall."


    The Proposed zoning regulations.

    For a large swath of the area, there are currently no height restrictions. New regulations would place residential height limits at 135 feet (145 feet on wider streets) and 135 on the commercial side. Within the residential zoning, an 80/20 exclusionary housing bonus allows developers to reach the maximum height, provided that 20% of the floor ratio be set aside for low to moderate-income housing. Very few members of the public who spoke said they were satisfied with the ratio.

    One major concern was for residents who already live west of the avenue. Several requested that an anti-harassment/no demolition provision, already provided east of the avenue, be extended to the river. But a spokesperson from CPC said the zoning provisions would be out of the scope of this proposal. Bob Gereke, a local business owner and longtime resident, expressed concern about the effects that investor landlords may have on the character of the neighborhood and on his elderly neighbors in particular. “We have groups of young tenants who we don’t know and who don’t speak to us in the hallways.”

    Several recalled the bad old days of prostitution, drugs and car theft. “We remember the time when Hell’s Kitchen was a description of this area,” one speaker said to laughter and cheers. “We’ve been here, and now they want to push us out.”

    For architect and longtime resident D. Lucian Iliesiu, there are the aesthetics to consider. Iliesiu argued that 12th Avenue is on its way to becoming a very desirable address. “It's logical to consider the blocks between as having a lesser importance and serving a lower status from a zoning point of view, than the blocks eastward of them,” he said. While much of 12th Avenue's river views are obstructed by the hulking cruise ship terminals, to the south the Intrepid and Pier 83 park offer spectacular views of the river and a Morris Lapidus designed hotel built in 1962, which now houses the Chinese General Consulate.

    http://www.archpaper.com/e-board_rev.asp?News_ID=5118

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    Great Pyramid of Hell's Kitchen Formally Unveiled, Going Rental

    February 7, 2011, by Joey Arak










    [Renderings by Bjarke Ingels Group.]

    The worst-kept secret in New York City architecture is finally out. After comic book readers and Harvard students got glimpses of rising Dutch Danish superstar Bjarke Ingels's pyramid-like apartment building planned on far West 57th Street, the 36-year-old Rem Koolhaas disciple is ready to introduce his magical mystery mountain to the people who might one day live inside it. The full reveal is on the Bjarke Ingels Group website, and Ingels is profiled by Justin Davidson in this week's New York magazine, which both grows the myth surrounding the hipstertect and reveals many of the details behind the high-rise set to go up next to the West Side Highway.

    The pyramid or mountain or whatever you'd like to call it will be a rental building (if approved; the first community board hearing is Wednesday), one that revolutionizes the hack-filled genre, Davidson writes. Ingels has talked about the project being a combination of a Copenhagen courtyard with a New York skyscraper, and here's more on that:
    The new building, he explains, will fuse two apparently incompatible types: a European-style, low-rise apartment block encircling a courtyard, and a Manhattan tower-on-a-podium, yielding something that looks like neither and behaves like both. New York is ready to embrace such a griffin, he insists: “This is the country that invented surf and turf! To put a lobster on a steak—any French chef would tell you that’s a crime.”
    But it looks like this dinner won't have all the fixins. The sloped rooftop's plantings, seen in the early comic-style rendering, don't appear to have made the final cut, but the garden gap and balcony incisions certainly did. And don't think Ingels is just cramming some craziness into this long-empty lot without considering its environment. The greenery is a visual connection to Hudson River Park, and the building's shape helps create and preserve some excellent views while pulling back from the noisy West Side Highway and nearby sanitation garage. Oh, and isolated neighbors (lookin' at you, Riverside South) take note: The renderings also show an Amish Market in one of the retail spaces. So how did Ingels, largely unknown in this country, land a 450' tower developed by the risk-averse Durst Organization? According to the legend, after Douglas Durst spoke at a Copenhagen conference about sustainable design, the daring Dane approached him and said, "Why do all your buildings look like buildings?" And for his insolence he was drawn and quartered hired! So let that be a lesson to you, aspiring young starchitects: The best way to impress a potential client is to insult him to his face.

    Pyramid Scheme [NYM]
    Bjarke Ingels coverage [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...ing_rental.php

    http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/12489
    Last edited by Merry; February 7th, 2011 at 07:44 PM.

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    Hell's Kitchen Seeks Heaven-Sent Rezoning

    By SHELLY BANJO

    As construction of skyscrapers and lofty condominiums begins along the 26-acre Hudson rail yards project, residents of next-door Hell's Kitchen area are looking to spruce up their own neighborhood, with an eye toward also keeping it affordable.


    Hustler Club on 12th Avenue.

    The community board that includes Hell's Kitchen, also known as Clinton, has teamed up with the Department of City Planning on a plan to rezone 18 blocks of the district. The aim is to make it less of a manufacturing zone and more of a mixed-use community, with a range of residential, retail and community space.

    City planners and neighborhood residents believe they can better handle the area's anticipated growth if they begin planning for it now.

    "With all the tall buildings going up around the city and plans for the luxury skyscrapers of the Hudson Yards encroaching on the neighborhood, Clinton became concerned," says Robert Benfatto, district manager of Community Board 4.

    On March 2, the community board intends to hold a public hearing to present the plan, which could create 1,600 residential units and reduce the amount of commercial space in the area, according to an environmental impact review from the city. The plan would limit the height of new buildings. It also is intended to preserve historic buildings, create affordable housing and prohibit new hotels and entertainment establishments.


    A car wash at 46th Street.

    The zoning changes would apply to the area between 10th and 12th avenues from 43rd to 55th streets, covering part of a diverse area that began as a rural riverfront in the 1800s. Later, it became the industrial locus of tanneries and manufacturing companies, as well as a hub of Prohibition breweries.

    Strict zoning rules had long kept Hell's Kitchen a mostly industrial area with a mix of storage facilities and warehouses, car-repair shops and strip clubs. Zoning rules were relaxed after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, ushering in new developments like the Hearst Tower on 56th Street, Offices also opened by companies like advertising agency Ogilvy & Mather and retailers Prada and Kenneth Cole Productions.

    Consolidated Edison Co. and FedEx Corp. continue to operate in the neighborhood. Meanwhile, large luxury buildings are on the rise, including developer Larry Silverstein's twin 60-story Silver Towers as well as the 505 on West 47th Street and Two Trees' Clinton Park on 11th Avenue, which looks to complete the first phase of a 900-unit complex later this year.

    Just on the outskirts of the planned rezoning district, on 57th Street, development company Durst Fetner Residential unveiled plans this week to build an expansive, pyramid-shaped luxury apartment building rising 450 feet. The new building will include 770,000 square feet of retail space and a community organization, which Durst says could be the International Center of Photography. A center spokesman declined to comment.


    11th Avenue looking northwest.

    As longtime residents watch the luxury high-rises descend on their neighborhood and see the expiration of current affordable-housing provisions, many worry about preserving the fabric of the neighborhood. They say the 80-20 tax-exempt bond program, which sets aside 20% of a development for affordable units, won't sustain the neighborhood for the long term because the provisions promoting affordability are temporary.

    "We're a community that's been undergoing a ton of rapid change and we don't want to see another large building go up without permanent affordable housing," Sarah Desmond, co-head of Community Board 4's Clinton/Hell's Kitchen land-use committee, said this week.

    With the influx of housing and development, concerns over space for the neighborhood's school children has become top priority for a neighborhood that is at risk of lacking seats for more than 1,000 students by 2019, according to a 2009 report by New York City Comptroller John Liu.

    "Where are these kids going to go to school over here?" says Tom Cayler, a resident and member of the West Side Neighborhood Alliance, a community group. By the time the new planned schools are built, "we think they will already be overcrowded," he says.

    Community members also bemoan the dwindling amount of open space and parks. "We want to know what can the public get that's green," said city Councilwoman Gale Brewer, after a presentation on plans for the new Durst building.



    Even though the community board and the Department of City Planning are jointly sponsoring the rezoning, the push and pull between the city and residents over approval won't be simple. Neighborhood groups are seeking to bulk up provisions to include more family-sized affordable housing, provide residents with protections against being pushed out by landlords and augment the area's schools and open space.

    Four years in the making, the formal rezoning process is just beginning. After the community board's public hearing in March, the rezoning proposal has to go through the Manhattan borough president's office, the City Planning Commission and finally the City Council before obtaining approval.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...rk_real_estate

  14. #104

    Default

    The UPS site must have enormous air rights. I wish that China would buy that site and make a huge, new complex next to the POS that currently houses its current delegation.

  15. #105

    Default

    Silverstein has plans for a one million square foot building on the far west side. Beyond that I don't know anything else.

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