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Thread: Clinton / Hell's Kitchen Development

  1. #106
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianac View Post

    "Studio City" project of 1,350 apartments approved for Clinton

    The City Planning Commission last month approved several zoning applications for the redevelopment of 44th and 45th Streets, Eleventh Avenue and a line 125 west of Tenth Avenue.

    The development is known as Studio City and is a project of the Gotham Organization, which is headed by Joel Picket.
    DEMO has started on an old 1-story building at midblock here (535 W 44th). It was Permitted last spring, but just got started. They've also been surveying and marking along the railroad cut at the east side of the site.

    The paperwork shows that 535 W 44th is owned by the NYC SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION AUTHORITY; it sits just to the west of old PS 51. Last summer this lot was separated out from the big zoning lot that encompasses the Gotham site and covers much of this block.

  2. #107
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    There's some serious excavation going on for that "Studio City" project on Eleventh.

  3. #108
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    A truckload of newly permitted applications are up at DOB.

  4. #109
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    After 37 Years, Gotham West Site Is Rising

    By JOSH BARBANEL

    In 1975, just as New York City was spiraling toward a fiscal collapse, it condemned most of a square block obf warehouses, factories and stables in Hell's Kitchen for a housing development.



    Thirty-seven years later, the roar of excavators and drill rigs can finally be heard. The site on West 45th Street is at last being transformed into one of the largest residential developments in Manhattan in decades, following years of tenacious community lobbing for "affordable" housing.

    The story of how the development—dubbed Gotham West in city documents—came back from the dead demonstrates why complex, large-scale affordable housing developments are so difficult, but also still possible in New York despite the uncertainty hanging over the economy.

    The project came back to life as part of a compromise struck seven years ago between the community and the Bloomberg administration over the rezoning of the Hudson Yards on the far West Side. The final deal took years to iron out and was made possible by the continuing strength of Manhattan's market-rate rentals.

    The $520 million project will have 1,258 apartments in four buildings, including 556 market-rate rentals in a 31-story tower that will help pay for its 682 affordable units and generate $20 million for affordable housing elsewhere in the city.

    The project also will include a new 670-seat school, more than 10,000 square feet of private gardens, a row of stores along 11th Avenue and 20 condos.

    "This is absolutely a success stories," says City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, who was 8 years old in 1975 when the city condemned the site, and now represents the area.

    The final pieces of a complex financing closed in the summer, and excavation and shoring work is now under way. The financing includes tax-exempt bonds from the state Housing Finance Agency and federal tax credits, and it is backed by the credit of a consortium of banks led by Wells Fargo, which were in turn backed by $200 million in collateral provided by the developer and an investor.

    David Picket, president of the Gotham Organization, a fourth-generation family-run business developing the project, said it is scheduled to open in 2014. Many of the affordable units would be for middle-class families, including those with incomes of up to $139,000 for a family of four, under current guidelines.

    Mr. Picket says prices for the market-rate rentals haven't been set. But the development is moving forward at a time when average rents in Manhattan are near record highs, despite the uncertain economy, according to rental data by CitiHabitats.

    The saga of the Gotham West site underscores the perils of development in New York. In the early 1970s, when the site was condemned, the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood was seeing a wave of development after decades of decline and falling population. It was even rechristened Clinton to improve its image.

    As the city and state struggled with deep financial crises, housing development slowed down. There were several attempts during the 1980s and 1990s to revive a housing plan for the site, but eventually the city abandoned proposals for affordable housing.

    The block was turned over to the Economic Development Corp. and in 2000 the city approved a plan to turn it into a complex called "Studio City," with a 500,000-square-foot building with space for studios, offices and television production. A developer was selected, but the project was never built.

    The housing plan was finally saved through a political compromise, as Mayor Michael Bloomberg successfully pushed to rezoning the Hudson Yards area on the far West Side in 2005. The deal included the promise to housing advocates and the Clinton community board of at least 600 affordable apartments at Gotham West.

    That deal was followed by four years of wrangling between the developer and the community board over the size and shape of the development. "It was a meandering path that got us to this point," says Matthew M. Wambua, the city's housing and development commissioner.

    The community wanted to set a maximum height of 15 stories; the developer proposed a 44-story tower on 11th Avenue. Eventually they agreed on a maximum height of 31 stories.

    Mr. Picket said this meant the buildings on the side streets had to be larger than initially planned. To reduce the impact, he says, the design by SLCE Architects includes setbacks for most buildings. Also, the bulk of the brick façade was broken up by vertical metal panels and shadows to create the illusion of a row of smaller brick buildings.

    Mr. Wambua said that while some smaller city housing projects require subsidies, Gotham paid the city a total of $35 million for the site, some of which will go toward affordable housing and the construction of a new home for P.S. 51. "The critical mass we were able to do here, below 96th Street, does not happen very often," he says.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...NewsCollection

  5. #110
    Senior Swanky Peteynyc1's Avatar
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    A friend ran into a guy on 52nd street between 9th & 10th who told her that he was going to be developing both of the buildings of that abandon hospital. He said he was turning it into a 240 unit rental building. I haven't found anything about it online anywhere but I know people have been in there working on things - not sure to what extent. Any one have info on this?

  6. #111
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    On the Far West Side, ‘Mega’ Is the New Norm

    By C. J. HUGHES




    Work has started on the site, between 44th and 45th Streets.

    THE far west side of Midtown, once notable mostly for being home to the Javits Center and the city’s few remaining stables, is quickly becoming known for huge residential projects like Silver Towers, with 1,360 units; MiMA, with more than 800 units as well as a hotel; and Mercedes House, with 850 units.

    Now comes Gotham West, a vast rental-and-condominium complex that will take up nearly all of the block from 44th to 45th Street and from 10th to 11th Avenue. Its construction will involve a feat of engineering: the extension of a platform over below-grade railroad tracks that bisect the site.

    Gotham West, which broke ground this summer and is expected to open in 2013, though most likely with a different name, is also packing a remarkable amount of housing into that block.
    Its 1,263 units will range from 475-square-foot studios to 1,400-square-foot three-bedrooms, and will include both market-rate and income-restricted rental apartments, though with a handful of condos as well.

    According to renderings from the developer, the Gotham Organization, the 556 market-rate rentals will be clustered in what is essentially a single U-shaped brick building on the site’s western side, though it will appear to be adjacent towers of varying heights, from 7 to 31 stories. That design was chosen to diversify the streetscape, said David Picket, the president of the Gotham Organization.

    “We wanted to give it a little delicacy,” Mr. Picket said.

    But the bulk of the project will be affordable units, 682 of them, or more than half the total homes. In fact, Gotham West represents the largest-ever affordable project undertaken in New York by a private developer, according to a spokesman for the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, which previously controlled the site.

    Those apartments, with reduced rents, will be reserved for families who make below a certain income level, with three tiers of eligibility: those who earn up to 50 percent of the area’s median income; up to 135 percent; and up to 165 percent.

    Some of those units will be scattered among the market-rate homes on the western side, which will also have 1,700 square feet of retail space, possibly including a specialty food store, Mr. Picket said.

    Most, though, will be at midblock between 44th and 45th Streets and will share a landscaped, Wi-Fi-enabled two-level private courtyard with other residents.
    The remaining 243 affordable apartments will be in a pair of 14-story towers on the site’s eastern side, over the railroad tracks.

    Finally, 25 condos will be built in a 40,000-square-foot red-brick former elementary school on 45th Street. It housed Public School 51 until this fall, when students were relocated to Our Lady of Good Counsel, a former Catholic school on the Upper East Side.

    Behind the recently vacated school, the School Construction Authority is building a replacement, which is supposed to be completed by fall 2013. On a recent afternoon, a few stories of its framing were visible. The condos are also to be completed in 2013, Mr. Picket said.

    Developers say both market-rate and affordable units will have stainless-steel appliances and granite counters, though the market-rate units will get wooden strip flooring while the affordable get parquet. The designs for the condos are still under consideration.

    Although rents have yet to be determined, market-rate one-bedrooms in new buildings in the area, on high floors with sweeping views, average $4,000 a month, brokers say.

    Having so many affordable apartments also allowed the $520 million project to qualify for tax-exempt bonds from the state’s Housing Finance Agency. Still, the Gotham Organization is contributing $200 million of its own money. The condos will be financed separately.

    The site was condemned by the city in the 1970s and largely cleared, to make way for new buildings that never materialized, despite a range of proposals. The most recent one, in the early 2000s, was to erect Studio City New York, a 15-story complex with 7 film and TV soundstages as well as a restaurant and shops.

    Instead, the site has mostly been a place to park cars and board police horses through the decades.

    What changed is Hudson Yards, the megadevelopment planned for a few blocks south. As part of the deal that allowed that area to be rezoned for offices and homes, Clinton residents were promised more below-market-rate housing, which led to the approval of Gotham West.

    Even with the other major projects in the neighborhood, there is little risk of oversaturation, said Daniel Neiditch, the president of River 2 River Realty, a brokerage that has rented apartments there for a decade. Adding housing supply, especially large projects like Gotham West, can generate more demand in an area in transition like Clinton, Mr. Neiditch said, because it conveys a sense of stability and permanence to potential residents.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/08/re...ref=realestate

  7. #112

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    THey need to acquire that crap garage.

  8. #113

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    First they need to find someone willing to build something not some ginormishly crappy...our hood has become the dumping ground for all that is wrong
    with architecture (and I use that term loosely) in NYC.

  9. #114

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    Is that gas station being torn down as part of this development? I'm not clear on that. I would certainly hope so. I think it's good whenver a gas station/auto body-muffler shop, etc. is torn down in Manhattan. Move that kind of junk to Secaucus.

  10. #115

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    Not that we've been told.

  11. #116

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    That sucks. No wonder the rendering you always see is from the 11th Avenue side.

  12. #117
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    That gas station must earn a fortune. And more in the future as all the other stations around downtown keep getting squeezed out.

  13. #118
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    I don't see why the gas station not being part of this development is a bad thing. The footprint of this project already takes up the rest of the block, we don't need to have one that takes up an entire block from avenue to avenue.

    I don't care about gas stations/auto shops either but many will get redeveloped anyway.


    The footprint size of new projects in this city is getting disturbingly huge and that's not good.

  14. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    I don't see why the gas station not being part of this development is a bad thing.
    Because I'd rather have actual stores and restaurants lining the block rather than a 200 foot gas station lining the entire block. And is the rest of the development being built right up to the lot line? If the eastern side of the development is being built right to the lot line with windows facing east, that may preclude a new building going up where the gas station is if that building would be right against the windows.

    I agree that many new projects do have overly large footprints, but I'd still rather have an entire block of residential/retail rather than have some of the block be a gas station. I actually hope they leave the east wall of the development blank so that something else can be built they that would not block any windows.

    It also sucks that there will be no 7 subway entrance at 42nd and 10th. That would have been only a 2-3 minute walk from this site. It will now be a much, much longer walk to the subway.

  15. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    Because I'd rather have actual stores and restaurants lining the block rather than a 200 foot gas station lining the entire block.
    The gas station will be gone very soon anyways.

    The land is much more valuable as a residential development site than selling gas, which has very low margins. Even tremendous volume can't save it, which is why Manhattan gas stations are dropping like flies.

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