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Thread: 100 11th Ave: Vision Machine - by Jean Nouvel

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    Default 100 11th Ave: Vision Machine - by Jean Nouvel

    100 11th
    100-110 Eleventh Avenue / 535-541 West 19th Street
    21 stories 250 feet (DoB)


    Architect: Atelier Jean Nouvel
    Executive Architect: Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, LLP
    Developer: Cape Advisors Inc/Craig Wood
    Associate Developer: Alf Naman Real Estate Advisors

    Residential Condominium
    143,289 Sq. Ft. 72 units
    Under Construction: Fall 2006 - Fall 2008

    http://www.nouvelchelsea.com/




    © dbox


    Construction Begins On Architect Jean Nouvel’s “Vision Machine” Along Manhattan’s West Side

    NEW YORK, NY In 1987, maverick French architect Jean Nouvel burst onto the international scene with a new headquarters for the Arab World Institute in Paris, one of President François Mitterrand’s Grands Projets. With mechanized oculi and veils of glass and steel, the building was hailed as an unconventional masterpiece that encouraged people to not only accept modern architecture in a historic setting, but to be thrilled by it. Over ensuing years Nouvel has woven art, history, cultural references and new building technologies into provocative architectural contrasts between inside and outside, intimacy and the urban network, and has become renowned as one of the most original designers of his generation.
    In conjunction with the 20th anniversary of the opening of the Arab World Institute, construction has begun in New York City on Nouvel’s latest glass and steel landmark, a direct material and conceptual descendant of his Paris tour de force: 100 11th will be a 23-story tower described by its architect as “a vision machine” at the intersection of 19th Street and the West Side Highway, along the Hudson River in Manhattan. It will feature the most highly-engineered and technologically advanced curtain wall ever constructed in New York City — a gently curving, glittering mosaic of nearly 1,700
    different-sized panes of colorless glass, each set at a unique angle and torque, sheathing one of the most meticulously customized, high performance residential addresses in the nation. The building’s dazzling Mondrian-like window pattern will frame splendid views from within the tower while producing an exterior texture that serves as a poetic analog for the vibrancy, density and changeability of New York.



    © dbox


    100 11th Avenue, designed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel with Beyer Blinder Belle, will also feature a radical innovation at its base, where Nouvel has placed an additional seven-story street wall of mullioned glass 15 feet from the building’s façade to reflect fleeting images of life beyond the building while creating a semi-enclosed atrium unprecedented in New York City. Within the atrium, suspended gardens of ornamental
    vegetation and trees will appear to float in mid-air; private indoor and outdoor terraces will extend from residences; and an open-air dining patio for the lobby restaurant.

    Containing 72 residences, 100 11th will stand on the north corner of its intersection, facing Frank Gehry’s newly completed headquarters
    for the IAC/InterActive Corporation across the street and the Chelsea Piers Sports and Entertainment Complex across the avenue, in the heart of a neighborhood now considered one of the world’s foremost contemporary arts districts. The homes within 100 11th will range in size from 890 square feet to 4,675 square feet, and will include one-, two- and three- bedroom apartments, and five unique penthouses. The building’s top floor will comprise a single grand residence with a full-roof private terrace featuring
    what Nouvel has dubbed “outdoor rooms.” Prices for the properties will range from $1.6 million to $22 million.

    Renowned design and preservation architecture firm Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, LLP, of New York City, is serving as executive architect for the building, under the direction of partner John H. Beyer. The building, which will be LEED certified, has been developed by Cape Advisors Inc., New York. Associate developer is Alf Naman Real Estate Advisors of New York City. General contractor for 100 11th is Gotham Construction Corporation, Inc. Exclusive sales and marketing agent for the project is Corcoran Sunshine Marketing Group.


    © dbox

    The Building

    Declaring, “Each new situation requires a new architecture,” Jean Nouvel has ambushed conventional tower design by forming the building’s mass along a curve that traces the entire breadth of its site. This gesture maximizes both street frontage and views from within the building, insuring that all of the residences at 100 11th have full access to south and west views and light. From the smallest to the largest, every single residence in the building will enjoy a sweep of uninterrupted floor-to-ceiling window wall — from 35 to 175 linear feet — on the main façade.

    Every angle and structural detail at 100 11th has been designed to create visual excitement for the both those living within the tower and passers-by on the street. The main south curtain wall is comprised of approximately 1,647 completely different colorless windowpanes organized within enormous steel-framed “megapanels” that range from 11 to 16 feet tall and as wide as 37 feet across. Each windowpane inside these megapanels is tilted at a different angle and in a different direction — up, down, in, out - bearing a slightly different degree of transparency according to a system meticulously developed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel and inspired in part by the renowned stained-glass window cycles of the 13th century Gothic cathedral of Sainte-Chapelle in Paris. The result of Nouvel’s system is a composition with a structural purpose in the service of the architect’s primary goal: framing views within residences while producing a poetic public statement about the inherent beauty of the fragmented, varied, ever-changing life of New York City and its island relationship to water and sky.

    By contrast, the north and east façades of 100 11th will be clad in black brick that references the masonry characteristic of West Chelsea’s industrial architecture. These façades will also contain a complex and beautiful pattern of different-sized punched windows framing dramatic views from inside. On the north façade, the building will also express motion within: Elevator shafts will contain random LED lighting and full-scale punched windows, so that passengers in glass-walled cabs can see city vistas as they ascend at 450 feet per minute, while twinkling light patterns are visible from elsewhere in the neighborhood.Residents of 100 11th will enter the building through a door on 19th Street and a transitional vestibule, into a dramatic lobby space with 20 foot-high ceilings. Like the south façade, this space traces the full breadth of the site. Within this main lobby, bright exterior reflections will give way to a contemplative atmosphere of low, soft lighting via fixtures custom designed by Jean Nouvel. Enormous, single-pane punched windows of different textures and degrees of transparency will face the building’s private multi-tiered slope garden on the north side of the building, bringing nature indoors.The lobby will also include stations for a 24-hour doorman and concierge, with custom millwork desks designed by Jean Nouvel; access to a ground-floor restaurant and dining patio; private residents’ mail room, package and refrigerated storage room; private residents’ automatic bank teller; access to the garden; and a private elevator landing serving the residences above and the gym, spa and pool area below.

    At 70 feet long, the building’s mirror-canopied pool will be one of the longest in Manhattan. The majority of the pool is sheltered within the building’s structure, with 24 feet extending into a landscaped outdoor space (the lower tier of the garden). A state-of-the-art glass partition has been customized by Nouvel to enclose the indoor portion of the pool so that residents can enjoy it all year, regardless of weather. A fitness center includes spa facilities (steam room, sauna, and individual changing cabanas with showers) and a private residents’ lounge that looks out over the lower level of the garden. Adjacent to the lounge and fitness area will be a private screening room for residents.



    © dbox


    The Loggia

    At 100 11th, Nouvel has conceived one of the most creative and revolutionary solutions to the challenges of low-floor dwelling ever seen in New York City. At a distance of 15 feet from the building’s south façade, he has placed a free-standing “screen” of densely mullioned glass — a near repeat of the main façade’s steel-framed mosaic pattern — rising seven stories. The space created between the tower’s multifaceted glass curtain wall and this street wall screen forms a semi-enclosed atrium
    called “The Loggia,” containing a complex structural steel grid.

    The grid will contain a world unto itself, a space unlike any other in New York City, to be shared exclusively by the residents of the building’s Loggia Residences on first seven floors. Here, every apartment enjoys a unique floor plan. Terraces — some enclosed and others open to the space — grace various apartments in the atrium. Fully grown trees and beds of ornamental plantings will be placed within the grid in an imaginative system of containers that appear to float in mid-air. Loggia terraces are all designed as year-round, indoor-outdoor spaces, with floor to ceiling glass on at least three sides and in-floor radiant heat.


    © dbox


    The Residences

    According to Beyer Blinder Belle partner John H. Beyer, “Jean Nouvel has a unique understanding of the way light and water work together to create constantly oscillating effects of reflection and shadow, and a special talent for using daylight as an architectural material.” At 100 11th, these special skills will be fully experienced withinthe residences of the building, where spatial organization and material applications are entirely in the service of views and the pleasure of natural light that changes over the course of days and seasons.

    Every apartment within 100 11th will boast a completely different pattern of powder-coated steel window mullions — a unique “fingerprint” — framing views and providing operable windows. Along these window walls, floors will be finished with an extra layer of nearly imperceptible transparent gloss that will boost incoming sunlight into rooms. Mechanized shade systems, customized by Nouvel, will allow residents to modulate and control the flow of daylight into spaces and further frame specific views.

    The palette of apartment interiors is pale and materials have been chosen to achieve maximum luminosity, with an overall look inspired by the sleek minimalism of the neighborhood’s many contemporary art galleries. Serene refuges for living with views and art, the apartments are highly disciplined, super-customized, luxurious combinations of white terrazzo flooring, white plaster walls, pale steel window framing, and a palette of carefully selected white and stainless steel materials in discreet kitchensand baths custom designed by Nouvel. Walls feature pocket doors and large-scale pivot doors that allow for increased flow of light and air between spaces.

    Interior architectural details have been conceived to amplify the light that pours into every residence: Angled beams taper as they recede into the rooms, encouraging the flow of light. The finishes on floors are more reflective in areas close to windows to boost illumination. Carefully crafted fixture plans include niche lighting, indirect lighting, and exposed light sources, all custom designed by Jean Nouvel.

    Open curved and rectilinear spaces throughout the residences were conceived to allow for the broadest possible variety of furniture configurations that take advantage of light and views.

    Kitchens flow spatially into open living areas, and are designed with luxury fixtures custom designed by Jean Nouvel to achieve the highest level of design excellence and to compliment art and furniture. These generously proportioned environments, composed of stainless steel, etched and clear glass, white terrazzo and custom lighting, encompass three “zones”: a pantry, a food preparation area with custom designed islands containing detachable rolling storage carts, and a cooking area with top line appliances. Similarly, bathrooms at 100 11th are studies in luxury customization, with pale, gleaming materials palettes (Nouvel-conceived geometric compositions of Corian, spandrel glass, fritted glass, porcelain, painted plaster and mirrors) developed for aesthetic continuity with the rest of the residence. Fixtures have been custom designed by Jean Nouvel for Jado.

    “The task of the architect is to encompass everything about the site, starting from the concrete conditions and the sensory impressions created by those, to memories of the place, through empathy to vision,” Nouvel has said. At 100 11th, the architect has translated this notion into extraordinary residences in a building with deep urban meaning, luminosity, and the high-technology innovations that have become his trademark in the two decades since his Arab World Institute opened to the public.

    The sales and design center for 100 11th is located two blocks north of the building site, at 547 West 21st Street, between Tenth Avenue and the West Side Highway.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post



    Links:

    100 11th Website

    Atelier Jean Nouvel

    Emporis Listing

    New Building Permit

    PropertyShark Listing

    Google Maps: 100 Eleventh Avenue

    Brownfield Cleanup Program: 535 West 19th Street Re-Development Site


    Articles:

    Real Estate Weekly
    $22m mezz loan for Nouvel luxury condos.
    October 11, 2006


    NY Post
    FAR WEST CHELSEA TURNS INTO CITY'S MOST EYE-CATCHING AREA
    By KATHERINE DYKSTRA
    Published: January 11, 2007


    CityRealty
    Unusual facades at Jean Nouvel's 100 Eleventh Avenue
    January 11, 2007


    Chelsea Now
    When Chelseas collide, ‘Venus’ is shadowed
    Volume One, Issue 20, February 9- 15, 2007


    New York Times
    After a 37-Year Run, a Roadside Venus to Be Veiled
    February 11, 2007


    The Real Deal
    Nouvel's 100 Eleventh Avenue: Through a glass, brightly
    By Steve Cutler
    April 2007


    Triple Mint
    100 11th Avenue - Jean Nouvel
    April 2007


    arcspace
    100 11th Avenue
    April 2, 2007


    New York Times
    Seductive Machines for City Living
    By NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF
    Published: April 2, 2007


    Gawker
    Even The Window Façades In Chelsea Aren't Straight
    April 2, 2007


    NY Sun
    Jean Nouvel's ‘Vision' Rising in Chelsea
    By DAVID FREEDLANDER
    April 5, 2007
    Last edited by Derek2k3; April 8th, 2007 at 09:45 PM.

  2. #2
    The Dude Abides
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    There's just something about a Derek thread...it's so official! Thanks, Derek!

  3. #3
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    That building looks gorgeous! A legitimate work of art, hopefully it will look as good as it's renderings.

  4. #4

    Arrow The Vision Machine: good post!

    Quote Originally Posted by pianoman11686 View Post
    There's just something about a Derek thread...it's so official! Thanks, Derek!
    Yes, that post is a great thread starter: both informative and instructive. This one has really hit the ground running..

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    The Dude Abides
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    Gehry's IAC is also anti-urban. But that doesn't keep it from being a great building.

    The context is the West Side highway in a formerly industrial part of Chelsea. If this were SoHo, I'd agree with you, but I see nothing wrong with this building. It certainly is eye-catching.

  6. #6

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    The context of IAC and 100 11th are both decidedly on the waterfront, which is great. If 100 11th was proposed for the site of 40 Mercer and vice-versa I don’t think I would be a very big fan of either, at there current sites I am of both. IAC is influenced by gusts of wind in a ships sails. 100 11th goes deeper and is far more profound, it is inspired by the dazzling qualities of water itself. Like 17 State Street it has the properties of a great body of water, reflection and encompassing qualities, but it goes beyond it with a truly unique facade that I am surprised no architect has ever noticed and proposed for a building in a waterfront context, it is just such a perfect match, as the sun rises or the sun sets it creates spectacular reflections on the water, little bits and pieces of glass reflect on the waterfront and its dazzling, I’m sure anyone who has ever walked on the Jersey shore looking towards Manhattan or on Queens West looking toward Manhattan knows what I’m talking about on certain almost magical nights. The effect which is dazzling and almost surreal, transcends here into a built form, the brilliance which is reflected onto the waterfront is put back in a tangible permanent built fixture. Furthermore I cannot wait to see the reflections 100 11th will cast on the waterfront come sunset, but that said the built form will very likely outshine the beauty of its own reflections, a claim that few if any buildings in New York can claim, and that just goes to further show how great a building this will be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stern View Post
    The context of IAC and 100 11th are both decidedly on the waterfront, which is great. If 100 11th was proposed for the site of 40 Mercer and vice-versa I don’t think I would be a very big fan of either, at there current sites I am of both. IAC is influenced by gusts of wind in a ships sails. 100 11th goes deeper and is far more profound, it is inspired by the dazzling qualities of water itself. Like 17 State Street it has the properties of a great body of water, reflection and encompassing qualities, but it goes beyond it with a truly unique facade that I am surprised no architect has ever noticed and proposed for a building in a waterfront context, it is just such a perfect match, as the sun rises or the sun sets it creates spectacular reflections on the water, little bits and pieces of glass reflect on the waterfront and its dazzling, I’m sure anyone who has ever walked on the Jersey shore looking towards Manhattan or on Queens West looking toward Manhattan knows what I’m talking about on certain almost magical nights. The effect which is dazzling and almost surreal, transcends here into a built form, the brilliance which is reflected onto the waterfront is put back in a tangible permanent built fixture. Furthermore I cannot wait to see the reflections 100 11th will cast on the waterfront come sunset, but that said the built form will very likely outshine the beauty of its own reflections, a claim that few if any buildings in New York can claim, and that just goes to further show how great a building this will be.
    I never thought about that dazzling effect, but I must say that I agree and can see where your coming from. But my question is, is that what Nouvel's intention was or does he just like mirrors.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stern View Post
    The context of IAC and 100 11th are both decidedly on the waterfront, which is great.
    No, I have to agree with pianoman. The context is the Westside Highway not the waterfront. Especially considering both buildings are or will be across from Chelsea Piers. The designs were influenced by the nearby river, but that's not the context. Though I think the architects wish it really was the context.

    I like Nouvel's building.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Citytect View Post
    No, I have to agree with pianoman. The context is the Westside Highway not the waterfront. Especially considering both buildings are or will be across from Chelsea Piers. The designs were influenced by the nearby river, but that's not the context. Though I think the architects wish it really was the context.

    I like Nouvel's building.
    Both buildings were designed to face the Hudson waterfront, not the Westside Highway or the Chelsea Piers. The highway and the piers only mildly detract from the architects vision.

  10. #10
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Solution. Demolish Chelsea Piers.

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    Just making a note here, the rendering posted of the building in the skyline is somewhat innacurate as everything is stretched. Look at One Penn Plaza and the ESB as reference.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy View Post
    Solution. Demolish Chelsea Piers.
    Excellent idea. I've never understood what people think is so great about Chelsea Piers, its blocks off the Waterfront, its architecture is ugly, and it doesn't provides a service to anyone other than the rich as everything it offers is excessively overpriced. Its owner is somehow seen as a visionary though, all I see is a cheap monopolistic product with no money or interest invested in design and site context. Yet the mastermind behind Chelsea Piers was put in charge of rebuilding the World Trade Center site, I guess the fact that LMDC failed so miserably as an agency shouldnt come as a surprise to anyone then.
    Last edited by NoyokA; April 9th, 2007 at 09:07 PM.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy View Post
    Solution. Demolish Chelsea Piers.
    Hear, hear. That's my one complaint about the aesthetics of 100 11th: that it overlooks Chelsea Piers.

  14. #14
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    Default We are stuck with Chelsea Piers for about 40 more years.

    A sweetheart deal at the time, it was meant to jumpstart the neighborhood into a more vanilla, upper middle class type place. The idea seems to have worked.

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    Sweetheart deal indeed. Betts has some VERY high up connections.

    Too bad we can't get rid of the unsightly suture now that the neighborhood has renewed.

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