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Thread: 21 Ann Street

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    According to NYC DOF (see document below with Block / Lot numbers) the lot at 21 Ann has been combined (see Map below) with the lots at 109-111 Nassau (the building here was just demolished ) & 113 Nassau (in the process of being demolished).

    The lot at 115-117 Nassau (~ 50' x 100') is NOT part of this parcel ...

    ***
    Thanks. I didn't think that it was. I think that the empty parking lot might be the site of Kaufman's proposed Intercontinental.

  2. #17
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Please, G** ...

    Do NOT let Kaufman build that fugly hotel there

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    Please, G** ...

    Do NOT let Kaufman build that fugly hotel there
    I agree.

  4. #19

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    August 15, 2007



    The Times’s First Home Is Being Torn Down

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP

    After enduring a century and a half of change in Lower Manhattan, decrepit and anonymous, the birthplace of The New York Times is now being torn down, brick by brick.

    By an odd turn of history, the demolition of The Times’s oldest home occurred just as the company settles into its seventh and newest headquarters, a 52-story tower across Eighth Avenue from the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

    Yesterday, a worker armed with an appropriately 19th-century demolition tool — a sledgehammer — sat astride the south wall of 113 Nassau Street, between Ann and Beekman Streets, pounding chunks of the structure into dust.

    “Little old building,” Margaret Moffatt said wistfully as she walked by on her lunch hour with some colleagues, one of whom, Henry Raven, was a bit more sarcastic. “Making way for progress,” he said.

    (Actually, it may be making way for a 28-story residential building, to judge from applications filed with the city’s Department of Buildings. The owners did not respond to telephone messages yesterday.)

    What Ms. Moffatt and Mr. Raven did not know — few New Yorkers do — is that Volume 1, Number 1 of The New-York Daily Times, four pages for one penny, was published at 113 Nassau Street on Sept. 18, 1851. The newspaper stayed there until 1854, when it moved a bit closer to City Hall.
    This six-story building was, in other words, a journalistic log cabin.

    And it was not much more accommodating. There was no glass yet in the windows on the evening when The Times first went to press. Breezes blew through the place, extinguishing the candlelight. “All was raw and dismal,” Augustus Maverick wrote in his 1870 biography of Henry J. Raymond, the founding editor.

    Raw and dismal it remained. What little architectural integrity the building possessed was all but wiped away in the 1970s when it became a McDonald’s. The property was put up for sale in 2004. The New York Times Company had no interest in buying it. There was no serious talk of landmark designation.

    From 113 Nassau Street, Raymond declared in his first editorial that The Times would present “all the news of the day from all parts of the world” and appear “for an indefinite number of years to come.”

    He said something else on that long-ago September day: “No newspaper, which was really fit to live, ever yet expired for lack of readers.” Where these words were written is now a pile of rubble.

    Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
    Last edited by ManhattanKnight; August 15th, 2007 at 11:02 AM.

  5. #20
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    As reported ^^^ DOB shows a New Building Permit Application for 113 Nassau (Disapproved 6.14.07) was filed by:

    Jacob Grossman, PE
    Rosenwasser/Grossman Consulting

    Very little other information other than "ULT. NO. OF STORIES 28"

    From this \/ website:

    http://www.condobuzznyc.com/2007_01_...c_archive.html

    RECENT PROPERTY SALES - DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN

    113 Nassau St - Store Building - $10,518,800 6/06

  6. #21
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    A 2004 story from the NY Times, posted at nyc-architecture.com :

    Where a Newspaper Began, the Only Sign Seeks a Buyer

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP
    March 2, 2004

    Having somehow survived as long as The New York Times itself, the tatterdemalion of a building where this newspaper was born 152 years ago is on the market for the first time in six decades, leaving its future uncertain.

    Home to The Times for the first 817 of its 52,776 issues to date, then to Leggat Brothers bookstore, George F. Cram's atlas company, the Vesuvius restaurant and finally a McDonald's, the decrepit six-story structure at 113 Nassau Street, between Ann and Beekman Streets, stands vacant. The asking price is $4.25 million, and no - just for the record - the Times Company isn't interested.

    "Been there, done that," explained Catherine J. Mathis, vice president for corporate communications.

    A new headquarters planned by The Times, across Eighth Avenue from the Port Authority Bus Terminal, will have four times as much space on a single newsroom floor as in the entire Nassau Street building, which was never well suited to the newspaper business. Augustus Maverick recalled the inaugural issue in "Henry J. Raymond and the New York Press," his 1870 biography of the founding editor.

    "The first number of the Times was 'made up,' in open lofts, destitute of windows, gas, speaking-tubes, dumb-waiters and general conveniences," Mr. Maverick wrote. "All was raw and dismal."

    He continued: "All the night, the soft summery air blew where it listed, and sometimes blew out the feeble lights; and grimy little 'devils' came down at intervals from the printing-room, and cried for 'copy'; and every man in the company, from the chief to the police reporter, gave his whole mind to the preparation of the initial sheet."

    The building, a brownstone, was still under construction when Raymond took it over. He had a Hoe's Lightning Press installed in the basement and declared, when his four-page New-York Daily Times first hit the cobblestones on Sept. 18, 1851, that the newspaper would be published "for an indefinite number of years to come."

    But not at 113 Nassau Street. Within three years, the demands of printing 28,000 copies a day were straining the operation to the breaking point. Readers up on 40th Street grumbled frequently about late delivery.

    "With new and improved machinery, and larger and more convenient premises," The Times reported in April 1854, "all which we shall have as soon as builders and machinists will do their part, we trust our subscribers will have still less reason to complain of delay, or of anything else, than they have had hitherto."

    A month later, the newspaper moved out and never looked back.

    At least until 1954, when a plaque honoring Raymond was set into the sidewalk out front by Sigma Delta Chi, a journalistic fraternity. Arthur Hays Sulzberger, the president and publisher of The Times, attended the ceremony, as did several Raymond descendants, Mayor Robert F. Wagner and Hulan E. Jack, the Manhattan borough president.

    The plaque described Raymond as a "pioneer in publishing the facts of the news without regard for party or personal preference." Customers heading for a 75-cent plate of spaghetti marinara at Vesuvius restaurant would have stepped right over it. Or on it.

    Vesuvius opened in 1945 under the proprietorship of Tobias Lenzo, who had arrived in the United States from Italy in 1904 and worked as a musical conductor until 1927, when he went into the restaurant business. He bought 113 Nassau Street in 1945 under the name Helen L. Realty Corporation, in honor of his wife.

    He died in 1947, but his children - the family name is now spelled Lenza - still own the building. "We got older and wanted to sell some things," said Michael J. Lenza, 71, explaining the decision to put it on the market.

    Massey Knakal Realty Services, sales agents, are selling the building "as is." They calculated the development potential of the site as 38,250 square feet, more than twice as much as the current structure. The presence of a two-story building on one side of No. 113 and a vacant lot on the other suggests the possibility of a larger property assemblage.

    After a quarter-century, McDonald's closed four years ago, leaving tall brick arches in a granite-tile facade that completely altered the lower half of the building, a large wall sign and a door decal promoting two apple pies for $1. (Plus tax.) Imprinted on the blank north wall, adjoining a vacant lot, is the ghostly silhouette of an old house that once stood at No. 115, with roof gables and a central chimney.

    There is no trace of the plaque and, for that matter, none of The Times.

    Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

  7. #22
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    Seems to be very little progress at this site - I wonder if they'll make that 2009 deadline

  8. #23
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Follow up to posts in Manhattan Residential Development thread ...

    The site at 113 Nassau has been cleared and waiting for something new for a few years. It offers a spectacular [COLOR=#4b0082][U][B]

  9. #24
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The damned formatting totally screwed up my links so here's the info without them ...

    The site at 113 Nassau has been cleared and waiting for something new for a few years. It offers a spectacular view of the Woolworth Building. It will also be very visible from City Hall Park above the J&R strip of low rise buildings along Park Row.

    DOB Application says 131 units, 28 stories.

    Architect: SLCE (nothing for this found on their website)

    The Schedule A indicates it will be a somewhat straight forward boxy thing, as it shows basically 6 units per floor from 6 - 26, then 4 units on 27 and 2 units on 28.

    Owner is Ann Nassau Realty LLC who bought the site in 2006.

    DOF shows recent mortgage for $27,560,000

    Lower Manhattan Info has nothing new for 21 Ann.

  10. #25
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    Thanks. Hopefully its not ugly like that new rental over on Gold Street.

  11. #26
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    Work has started over here. Debris is cleared, new signs are up, and they've started digging out the site fill. Still no renderings...

  12. #27
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    Ugly Kaufman hotel site here and for sale:



    Work on this site here:



  13. #28
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Not very glamorous!

  14. #29
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
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    So I guess I'm going to dredge up some old threads today, because I was searching for something, and I realized that some of these threads never had any closure. That's unfortunate. I like closure. In the meantime, this is just starting. Also, bonus pic of the Kaufman site upgraded with SOLDSOLDSOLD signs (new last week!)...




  15. #30
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    Deliveries and founding.


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