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Thread: How Big Is a City?

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by canguy23m View Post
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago

    according to that website metro Chicago covers an area of 28,163 km squared.
    I think the best way to compare cities is just to give them each 7000 km squared and compare what they have within those limits.
    Interesting idea. Might be worth some srudy. Have you done this with a few sample cities?

  2. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by canguy23m View Post
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago

    according to that website metro Chicago covers an area of 28,163 km squared.
    I think the best way to compare cities is just to give them each 7000 km squared and compare what they have within those limits.
    Interesting idea. Might be worth some srudy. Have you done this with a few sample cities?

    Sorry, bit I have to ask: Are you dispassionately motivated or are you trying to puff up Canadian cities?

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    Interesting idea. Might be worth some srudy. Have you done this with a few sample cities?

    Sorry, bit I have to ask: Are you dispassionately motivated or are you trying to puff up Canadian cities?

    When I'm comparing cities I have to at least make sure my favorite one, Toronto gets proper attention.

    When I look at the stats most American city metro areas cover a huge amount of area compared to other cities internationally. I think that gives them an undeniable advantage over other ones.

  4. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    Interesting idea. Might be worth some srudy. Have you done this with a few sample cities?

    haven't yet but I'd really be interested in the data from such a study.

  5. #20

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    7,000 sq. kms. applied to many European cities would include a lot of farmland. American cities are much more suburban. And that's what makes them less urban.

    North America's cities in which you can live an urban life: there aren't more than 20.

    The Canadian ones: Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Vancouver. Did I miss any?

  6. #21
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I once spent a week in Saskatoon in the dead of winter ...

    It wanted to be urban, but was distinctly not so.

    The curling was fun, though

  7. #22

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    ^ Never understood that game. Tell about it.

  8. #23
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    It's kind of like boules -- but with ice and a broom and one sticky-soled shoe.

    Seems curling is all the rage up where winter lasts for 8 months of the year.

    Curling and Drinking

    The perfect urban combination

  9. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    7,000 sq. kms. applied to many European cities would include a lot of farmland. American cities are much more suburban. And that's what makes them less urban.

    North America's cities in which you can live an urban life: there aren't more than 20.

    The Canadian ones: Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Vancouver. Did I miss any?

    Calgary might make the list it's one of the fastest growing cities in North America and Alberta has a per capita GDP of 60-70 thousand dollars us.

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by canguy23m View Post
    Calgary might make the list it's one of the fastest growing cities in North America and Alberta has a per capita GDP of 60-70 thousand dollars us.
    "Fastest growing" isn't a relevant criterion for urbanity. Phoenix and Las Vegas are fast growing. Per capita GDP also has nothing to do with it.

    I've never been to Calgary, but I doubt folks live urban lives there. I don't think there's a contiguous central area with streetwalls and a population.

    I know it has a glitzy skyline. So does Charlotte.

  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by canguy23m View Post
    another thing that I find misleading is when atlas's rank the world economies based on PPP Gdp rather than Nominal Gdp. Doesn't it make more sense to measure a country's economy based on current exchange rates rather than what their currency was worth a decade ago ?
    If you are trying to compare income/wealth in terms of what goods/services it allows one to consume/own then you do need to PPP adjust (the reference to old currency is not strictly correct, BTW), though it's not perfect (no atlernative is).

    FX rates mvoe all over the place. If a pair moves by 10% in amonth it does nto REALLY mean that people in one country just got 10% richer relative to the other, unless they start consuming entirely in that country...


    ------------------------------------

    On a separate note: f#cking awesome job, Ablarc. Really good. More than a 'baby step'.

  12. #27
    The Dude Abides
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    Plus, the average numbers are probably severely skewed by the energy industry there, even more so by the recent run-up in oil and gas prices.

  13. #28

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    I used to be (and still am actually) very interested in city sizes / population / area etc. A very good book i recently bought was the 'Metropolitan world atlas', published by IOI (aparently a Dutch publisher). The book contains statistics of about 100 of the worlds largest cities, such as density of population, household income, city size, crime levels, and even such information as average journey time to work. If you're interested in this subject its well worth buying the book.

  14. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Meerkat View Post
    A very good book i recently bought was the 'Metropolitan world atlas', published by IOI (aparently a Dutch publisher)... If you're interested in this subject its well worth buying the book.
    Thanks, I just ordered it.

    (Can't wait for it to arrive.)

  15. #30

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    I just googled that book and found it available to view online at Google Books. Looks interesting.

    Metropolitan World Atlas

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