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Thread: Domino Sugar Factory renovation & additions - Williamsburg - by Beyer Blinder Belle

  1. #61

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    The new design is much improved and looks great. The glass addition is no longer overpowering, it is subdued and stylistically connected, I like that it has different heights and follows parts of the outline of the building below. The Domino sign is a pleasant surprise and will look great as a piece of pop-art for generations to come. And creating balconies as a phantom object of the connecting bridges was a real nice touch acknowledging the buildings industrial past and crediting its own efforts at creating successful adaptive re-use.

  2. #62

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    ^ I agree....I hated it before, but this is actually quite nice.

  3. #63
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Don't forget the big towers arll around ...

  4. #64
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Those will mitigate somewhat the appearance that the plant is giving a huge middle finger to Manhattan.




  5. #65

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    it looks much better than the original design.

  6. #66
    Kings County Loyal BrooklynLove's Avatar
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    so so many new residential units coming to williamsburg, and most of them expensive. between the various edge and northside piers towers (5 in total?), the various other waterfront developments going up w/n blocks, this domino development and the littany of inland williamsburg development, this area is going to be bumpin. but i have no idea where all of these new residents are going to come from. not too many rich people (i.e., <$1mill> apartment) out there now looking to buy condos outside manhattan.

  7. #67

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    New York Daily News

    Push for all-new park at site of Williamsburg Domino building

    BY RACHEL MONAHAN
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

    Monday, August 4th 2008, 7:06 PM


    Instead of parked cars and salt piles, officials in Williamsburg are pushing for parkland at Domino factory site.

    It sure would be sweet to get some parkland, too.

    A city-owned parcel of land along the water next to the Domino Sugar factory should be transformed into a city park, local officials said.

    "It's a complete waste to have trucks parked along one of the most beautiful views in the entire world," said Williamsburg Community Board 1 member Evan Thies.

    The proposed parkland at 390 Kent Ave. is currently the site of a parking lot and a maintenance shop for the Departments of Transportation and Citywide Administrative Services.

    The site has been targeted as ideal parkland since at least 2005 when Councilman David Yassky (D-Williamsburg) included the property in a report on the city's top 10 "Waterfront Wastes and Opportunities."

    "The city does this a lot," said Yassky. "They own a lot of waterfront property, much of it being used for facilities that do not need to be on the water - everything from salt piles to tow pounds to plain old storage."

    A new condo development slated for the old sugar plant is expected to include 2,200 apartments - only adding to the dire need for more green space in the neighborhood, say community leaders.

    The neighborhoods of Williamsburg and Greenpoint have among the fewest park acres per residents, officials said.

    "That's particularly true of the southside," said Stephanie Thayer of the Open Space Alliance, the Greenpoint-Williamsburg park conservancy. "It impacts all of us. It means that the facilities at McCarren [Park] become overused. It means ballfields in McCarren end up turning into dirt fields. It means that much more garbage strewn around."

    Thies said turning the waterfront lot into a park could be included in the Domino rezoning hearings scheduled to begin as early as the end of the year.

    "The neighborhood is changing so much," said Williamsburg resident Clive Smith, 42, an artist, who was walking two dogs near the proposed park site last week. "It's okay for them to build these huge condos on the waterfront, but there should also be open parkland, so everyone can run, walk, cycle and walk their dogs."

    A spokeswoman for the City Planning Department, which will oversee the rezonings, did not rule out turning the lot into a park. "We'd be happy to look at the proposal," said city planning spokeswoman Jennifer Torres.

    With Annais Morales

  8. #68
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    wait -- is this southern end part of the factory being knocked down or saved? thx.


  9. #69
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    They'll knock down those buildings but save and re-use the sign.

  10. #70

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    NY1

    Updated 9:21 AM

    Domino Sugar Factory Esplanade Opens To The Public



    The view from Domino Sugar Factory was on full display yesterday, as it was opened up to the public.

    The factory was built back in 1884 and at its peak produced nearly three-million pounds of sugar each day.

    The Landmark Preservation Commission designated the Williamsburg refinery as a landmark last year.

    Redevelopment in the area includes an esplanade along the East River.

    Construction of residential buildings and the renovation of the historic Domino Sugar Factory buildings could begin next fall.


    Copyright © 2008 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

  11. #71

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    Activists Toss Another Roadblock in Front of Domino Sugar Conversion

    By Reid Pillifant
    April 10, 2009 | 10:55 a.m.

    James Hamilton.
    Stephanie Eisenberg last autumn, with the Domino Sugar Refinery in the background

    The winter chill that had settled over the old Domino Sugar factory has officially thawed. In late March, opponents of the planned condo conversion there reheated last summer’s landmarking controversy with a lawsuit against the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission.

    The suit, filed by the Williamsburg Independent People, claims the commission failed to properly disclose why it denied landmark status for the buildings that surround the hulking red-brick refinery. In 2007, LPC designated the refinery—which is actually three separate buildings—as a historic landmark, but the designation did not include several smaller buildings on the property, like an old powerhouse, a boiler house and a warehouse. (The iconic Domino Sugar sign was also not included in that designation, but LPC last summer secured a commitment that the sign will be preserved.)

    When WIP members requested that the remaining buildings be considered for landmark status, LPC responded by saying the whole site had been reviewed in its initial evaluation. WIP then filed suit, claiming the LPC process allows the commission’s chairman too much power to decide which requests advance beyond the preliminary evaluation committee, without any indication as to how that decision is made.

    “Landmarks just didn’t do their job. This whole site was very important in the birth of New York as a modern industrial city,” said WIP member Stephanie Eisenberg.

    The Landmarks Preservation Commission does not comment on pending litigation, and referred a request for comment to the city’s law department. “We have received the official papers recently and are in the process of responding to them. We believe there is no merit to the case and are prepared to vigorously defend the matter,” said a law department spokesperson.

    The current suit is the latest in a series of attacks on LPC’s decision-making process. The petition filed by WIP borrows much of its legal reasoning from the Citizens Emergency Committee to Preserve Preservation, a group that won a similar suit against the LPC in November.

    In that case, a judge ruled LPC must report all its committee recommendations, on the record, to the full commission. The decision came in the midst of a four-part investigative series by The New York Times, which concluded with an editorial calling on LPC to create a more transparent process.

    LPC has appealed the judge’s ruling, arguing that the process is not as singular as it seems. According to LPC, all requests are considered by a five-person committee, with the opportunity for commissioner input, before the chairman decides whether the property should advance. LPC claims that asking the full commission to hear every case would create an unworkable burden for its staff.

    The owner of the Domino site, Community Preservation Corporation Resources, is not named in the suit, although the petition is clearly a preemptive strike against the company’s plans for the property. CPC Resources would like to convert the defunct factory into a 2,200-unit residential complex, with at least one new 40-story tower. Landmark status for the remaining buildings would seem to derail those plans, since the protected buildings could not be cleared to make room for new construction. In previous landmark hearings, CPC Resources has opposed any further designations on the property. (The firm declined to comment, saying it couldn't comment on pending litigation.)

    WIP has made no secret that it would like to see CPC Resources abandon the project, and for the site to be used as a Tate Modern–style cultural center. “We want to see some kind of adaptive reuse that will give jobs to the area,” Ms. Eisenberg says. “There’s better ways of using this space than tearing it down.” Whether history is on their side is, for the moment, up to the courts to decide.


    Copyright The New York Observer.

  12. #72
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Starting in the New Year: Domino Sugar Fight



    Just because Atlantic Yards is (probably) now happening, that's not to say Brooklyn has seen the last of big development battles.

    Based on a notice from the Department of City Planning this week, it seems the fight over the former Domino Sugar factory site is set to kick off first thing in the new year. The proposed 2,200-apartment, 2.8 million-square-foot development is set to officially enter the seven-month public approval process on Monday, with the project front and center on City Planning's agenda.

    The project, being pushed by the Community Preservation Corporation, a development firm, calls for apartment towers to rise on five lots along the waterfront, and the conversion of the main Domino Sugar factory building into an apartment building. With the towers rising as high as 400 feet, the proposed development has spurred controversy from the surrounding community, which generally has been critical of the density.

    The issue will be a foray for incoming Councilman Steve Levin, the former aide to Brooklyn Democratic leader Vito Lopez, who will represent the district following an election this fall to succeed Councilman David Yassky.

    Mr. Levin has criticized the density, as has Mr. Lopez, who wants more below-market rate housing. The project currently calls for 660 apartments, or 30 percent, to be below-market rate, a rather high proportion given that multiple subsidies program award benefits at 20 percent.

    For anyone wanting to pore over the mountain of paperwork accompanying the project's start of public review, City Planning put the environmental impact statement on their Web site Thursday. Among the notable tidbits are an alternative plan with less density (consistent with the density up the East River in the rest of the Williamsburg waterfront), and a plan that calls for a hotel within the development.

    http://www.observer.com/2009/real-es...o-sugar-fight#

  13. #73

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    So these crony pols are a) opposing density, likely by demanding and requiring "green space" or "open space" next to/surrounding every building and creating suburban, un-bustling places; b) demanding that more and more money that could be used for city services or improving the city's fiscal health go toward 'affordable housing.' One day, if the pols ever lose their special-interest groups, they'll realize the rest of us would rather have decent subways than half of the city living at subsidized rates that we aren't entitled to.

  14. #74
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    The best way to make your voice heard is to go to these public review meetings.

    It's easy to criticize the pols (and bureaucrats) but if all they hear are the anti-everything folks, then they're going to assume that's what the public wants.

    You want to let them know what "the rest of us" really think.

  15. #75
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stroika View Post

    ... demanding and requiring "green space" or "open space" next to/surrounding every building and creating suburban, un-bustling places...
    In the case of the Domino project the green spaces are planned for areas within the blocks of the development, creating interior open gardens.

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