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Thread: Reasons people leave New York

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eugenious View Post
    seriously you have GOT to be kidding me everyone on this board thinks New Yorkers are nice?
    You expect them not to be and they'll oblige.

  2. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    You expect them not to be and they'll oblige.
    I've lived in NY for 15 years and have found the opposite to be true.

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eugenious View Post
    If I need someone to point out my flaws to me I'll ask my girlfriend, not that I will do anything about it but it never hurts to ask :P
    Aha! This^ is why New Yorkers are aloof towards you -- you are aloof towards them! If I have it straight, you're not interested in forming a casual Platonic friendship with a middle-aged female New Yorker, (that's me).

    Let me sweeten the deal: bring your girlfriend along. I'd like to get to know her and you. And I won't point out any flaws.

  4. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    You expect them not to be and they'll oblige.
    Last time i was in NYC, almost everyone I ran into was markedly polite. This included a raffish yet slilish old panhandler (who also had the good taste to compliment my sartorial choices).

    I "finally" ran into a "70's-style", rude / obnoxious person (a window clerk in the subway) He was like soemthing out of "mean streets".

    The only really unpleasant person was a dope dealer in Washington square whom, had he not been surrounded by assorted compadres, I would happily thumped upside the head.

  5. #20
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    More then any issue id say taxes and high cost of living.

  6. #21

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    right now we live in Jersey in the burbs but my wife works in Manhattan so we plan to move to Hoboken soon.

    When I say move away from NYC that in my current perception involves leaving the tristate area as well. The reasons, for me, when we make that decision might/will be kids, lack of a viable career in my field (engineering, not civil), desire to pursue certain hobbies that require lots of open space and money that can't go to rent anymore- flying, possibly boating someday....


    I find people easily approachable, or maybe they find me easily approachable.
    Just the other day a lady I helped out with her bag on the stairs down the JC PATH came and sat by me and told me her (sad) life story, and a middle aged guy in a bar in the East Village (granted,a little tipsy he was) was being very friendly and interested in where I was from. I don't think he was gay and hitting on me because I saw him chatting up girls as well, plus I was with my wife at the time also.

    I would tend to think that if you hang out more midtown and uptown you might run into those cold and unapproachable people I hear about, but we usually go out below 4th street so my perception might lack some perspective to go with it.

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rapunzel View Post
    Aha! This^ is why New Yorkers are aloof towards you -- you are aloof towards them! If I have it straight, you're not interested in forming a casual Platonic friendship with a middle-aged female New Yorker, (that's me).

    Let me sweeten the deal: bring your girlfriend along. I'd like to get to know her and you. And I won't point out any flaws.
    Lol, I didn't know you were female..did I mention I was a dashing 26yo young man 5"11 and 180lbs good look....err....sorry couldnt stop myself :P

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeKruger View Post
    right now we live in Jersey in the burbs but my wife works in Manhattan so we plan to move to Hoboken soon.

    When I say move away from NYC that in my current perception involves leaving the tristate area as well. The reasons, for me, when we make that decision might/will be kids, lack of a viable career in my field (engineering, not civil), desire to pursue certain hobbies that require lots of open space and money that can't go to rent anymore- flying, possibly boating someday....


    I find people easily approachable, or maybe they find me easily approachable.
    Just the other day a lady I helped out with her bag on the stairs down the JC PATH came and sat by me and told me her (sad) life story, and a middle aged guy in a bar in the East Village (granted,a little tipsy he was) was being very friendly and interested in where I was from. I don't think he was gay and hitting on me because I saw him chatting up girls as well, plus I was with my wife at the time also.

    I would tend to think that if you hang out more midtown and uptown you might run into those cold and unapproachable people I hear about, but we usually go out below 4th street so my perception might lack some perspective to go with it.
    No offense but you should not be having any problem getting a job in engineering. I know 10 firms that are looing for major help right now. Of Course youd have to work in the city, which im not sure youd want to

  9. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eugenious View Post
    Lol, I didn't know you were female..did I mention I was a dashing 26yo young man 5"11 and 180lbs good look....err....sorry couldnt stop myself :P
    So you've never browsed Pics of us...

    I've already made my point, I was friendly, the ball's in your court now.

  10. #25
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    Back on topic.

    Why do people move out?

    Well, it all has to do with what you are looking for and how you fit that mold.

    People ahve their own sense on a lot of thnigs, activity, personal space, nature, culture and a bunch of others. NYC has some in spades, but lacks others.

    As was mentioned, without the $$, it is very hard to own (or even have) anything here, including space. You will most likely be living on top of, next to, and below people that you may never meet, but probably know better than some of their own family members.

    You will not have a quiet place to walk where you can talk to yourself to your hearts content about this, that or the other without people looking at you funny. There is almost no place in the city to be alone that does not feel like something might be wrong.

    Schools and kids? Very difficult. A place where your kid can't bike, or skateboard, or play catch without having to walk XX blocks and deal with sunbathers and th elike is difficult to start with, but the sheer number of people and the utter impossibility of knowing everyone that might come in contact with your child in a 1 block radius is another.

    The fast paced lifestyle is another thing. GREAT when you want to step out for a drink, or get something to eat, but very hard for other social events where you have to rent space for any group larger than 6 (Unless, as mentioned previously, you are akin to one of the women on Sex in the City and you and all your friends can afford huge places that can seat 10 comfortably in your dining room)....

    Its tough. I don't think I could live in the city. Hoboken gives me enough buffer space, but I would still like to have my car closer than a mile from me (family in the burbs) and a place where I can set up a barbeque that would be LEGAL (yard, balcony, NOT roof or, perish the thought, living room).

    Brooklyn Heights is another facination of mine, but that would involve ditching or long-distance storage for the car. The areas surrounding the city are so nice.

    As for rudeness? It all depends on who you run into. The commuter crowd in Midtown seems a bit disconnected, but I attribute that more to work-day-grind and suburban insulation than outright native aggression.

    There are others though, usually the ones that see themselves as cheated and somehow deserving more from life, that treat the city poorly. The ones that will not walk 10 feet, ON THEIR WAY, to put their chewing gum in the trash can (saw one just 20 minutes ago). Ones that will be sitting next to a can in teh subway and will chuck their trash on the platform or tracks. Ones that will not get out of the way, take their packs off, fold their strollers on the cars.

    Some are clueless, and some deliberately disobey.

    But most I have seen I have been able to start a conversation with, no matter where they are from. From buisnessman to construction worker, homie to yentil, so long as you come from a direction that is respectful of them and who they are, most NYers are VERY nice and like the attension.

    The trick is the direction. You don't ask the construction worker where Bananna Republic is...


    Us, we will probably move a bit further out when/if the kids come. But we will miss parts of it very much.

  11. #26

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    The perception (key word) that the suburbs are quieter and safer...

  12. #27

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    I think New Yorkers are much nicer than Midwesterners. I grew up in Michigan and people are very nosey and fake nice. Here people generally leave you alone unless you don't want to be left alone.

    New Yorkers are also generally more helpful. In Michigan people don't know how to interact in public places.

    I also don't understand all your complaints about the homeless. Have you been to SF, DC, Chicago or LA? Those cities have a MUCH more visible and annoying homeless population. I don't see any in Brooklyn. I see a few in Manhattan and occasionally on trains.

    Sprawling areas don't have visible homeless, but that's because there's nobody on the sidewalks (if there even are sidewalks).

  13. #28
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    Agreed, on my travels to chicago, as recently as Memeorial day weekend, I couldnt go two blocks ( seriously) without being approached for money. LA is fool of fakes so if ther nice to you, there acting!!

  14. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by kliq6 View Post
    No offense but you should not be having any problem getting a job in engineering. I know 10 firms that are looing for major help right now. Of Course youd have to work in the city, which im not sure youd want to

    I'd love to know about them. Just please keep in mind that my degree is more towards general mechanical than civil engineering, and I do not have any experience with HVAC either.

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