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Thread: Hotel Chelsea - 222 West 23rd Street - Chelsea - by Hubert, Pirsson and Co.

  1. #61
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Like I said earlier:

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post

    It probably got delayed at CB4 because Kaufman has been notorious in the past for showing up unprepared ...
    Kaufman comes into these CB meetings with a huge chip on his shoulder, basically saying FU to the community reps and refusing to engage in any sort of conversation about his client's plans. He's not nearly so surly at the actual LPC hearings, but given his prior landmark-related violations, many are wise to his game don't give him much leeway.

  2. #62
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Hehehe.


    Hotel Chelsea Plans Nixed by CB4 After Presentation

    by Dave Hogarty

    When architect Gene Kaufman stepped to the podium at a Community Board 4 meeting last night and said that his design plans for a rooftop addition to the Hotel Chelsea would be barely visible, a single audience member broke the tension by braying in derision. That's pretty much where things stand between hotel owner Joseph Chetrit and opponents of his move to transform the bohemian landmark into a luxury hotel and nightspot. Kaufman presented a number of renderings to the board and the audience with all the enthusiasm of an elementary school student diagramming an explanation of how he'd accidentally run over the class hamster with his skateboard. When it was all said and done, CB4 voted to recommend that the Landmarks Preservation Commission deny the request to build the addition.

    Kaufman was met with mostly respectful and stony silence, interrupted only by some people asking him to speak up. As the architect presented it, the most visible portion of the rooftop addition will be water tanks that would be added and could be seen from 22nd Street. The rest of the addition would be barely visible because it is only 1/4 the size of the rest of the floors, explained Kaufman, and his assistant emphasized this point by indicating barely visible changes to the roofline in renderings with the tip of his finger.



    Some residents weren't buying it, however, and said that their rooftop access would be blocked by the addition, and a 150-person-capacity bar on the roof would be disruptive. CB4 requested that the LPC hold off on any decision until existing tenants' rights to rooftop access could be clarified, according to DNAinfo. The Landmarks Preservation Commission will hold its hearings on the Hotel Chelsea next Tuesday.

    Hotel Chelsea Owner Wants to Build Rooftop Bar, Documents Show [DNAinfo]
    In His Own Words, Architect Gene Kaufman's Plans for the Chelsea Hotel -- Part I [ChelseaHotelBlog]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/0...ation.php#more

  3. #63
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    charisma, personified



    LPC Ambivalent About Hotel Chelsea Rooftop Additions

    by Curbed Staff


    [charisma, personified]

    Fresh off a Community Board 4 presentation that was not particularly well received, architect/Bob Balaban impersonator Gene Kaufman went before the Landmarks Preservation Commission yesterday to present changes he plans on making to the Hotel Chelsea, which include, most notably, some rooftop additions that have the Chelsea's long-time residents pretty riled up. Kaufman claims that the 16-foot additions will be barely visible from the street, and, when asked what they would serve as, said, "We're looking at it as a lounge space," which was met with loud, contemptuous laughter from the residents in attendance. Eleven people delivered testimony against the additions, including Assembly Member Richard N. Gottfried's Deputy Chief of Staff, who read a statement on behalf of Gottfried, Rep. Jerrold Nadler, City Council Speaker Christine C. Quinn, Manhattan Borough President Scott M. Stringer, and Senator Thomas K. Duane.

    We are strongly opposed to the applicant's proposed 3,800 square foot rooftop addition for commercial use on the north side of the building which abuts existing, occupied roof-level apartments. The proposed materials of stucco, aluminum, and glass are not contextual with the original facade, the rooftop's brick masonry, and the slate cladding, all of which will be obstructed or obliterated by this addition ... There is a clear case that this modification would detract from the historical character and qualities of the building which make it such a prominent landmark.

    He went on to say:

    While we realize the effects of the proposed rooftop addition might have on existing tenants is not entirely within the LPC's purview ... If the proposed rooftop addition becomes an eating or drinking establishment, which seems likely, the noise levels will also have a negative impact on the existing tenants.

    This speech, and the ten speeches that followed, were met with passionate applause. Kaufman then addressed the criticism in the manner of a small balloon slowly deflating, saying things like, "As far as the concerns of the tenants, obviously there are regulations which cover tenants' rights." Multiple LPC members called the planned restoration "commendable," but overall the Commission was fairly split on the issue of the rooftop additions. They ultimately decided that they needed more information about a number of the smaller changes and agreed to review the case again at a later date.

    —Jeremiah Budin

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/0...tions.php#more

  4. #64
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    While we realize the effects of the proposed rooftop addition might have on existing tenants is not entirely within LPC’s purview, the tenants will nevertheless lose the use of the rooftop space and have a wall covering the windows of some apartments. This will result in a tremendous loss of light and air to the existing occupied rooftop apartments. If the proposed rooftop addition becomes an eating or drinking establishment, which seems likely, the noise levels will also have a negative impact on the existing tenants as well as residents in the adjacent buildings.
    ^ A no-brainer for not approving this?


    None of These Pols Will Be Partying at the Revamped Chelsea Hotel, and They Think Neither Should You

    By Matt Chaban

    Gene Kaufman, the swankest architect in town, went before the Landmarks Preservation Commission yesterday to try and win support for an addition atop the Hotel Chelsea, which Mr. Kaufman is redecorating for mysterious developer Joseph Chetrit. Tenants, who have lodged numerous complaints about the renovations, are especially concerned about a rooftop addition that they fear will become an all-night party spot. It turns out they have some powerful neighbors who agree.

    Every local elected official thinks the rooftop addition is a bad idea, and they submitted testimony to the commission saying so. Signed by Congressman Jerry Nadler, Borough President Scott Stringer, Council Speaker Christine Quinn, State Senator Tom Duane and Assemblyman Richard Gottfried, the letter (attached in full below) condemns the addition as a bacchanalia waiting to happen.

    While we realize the effects of the proposed rooftop addition might have on existing tenants is not entirely within LPC’s purview, the tenants will nevertheless lose the use of the rooftop space and have a wall covering the windows of some apartments. This will result in a tremendous loss of light and air to the existing occupied rooftop apartments. If the proposed rooftop addition becomes an eating or drinking establishment, which seems likely, the noise levels will also have a negative impact on the existing tenants as well as residents in the adjacent buildings.

    They don’t find the structure very attractive, either.

    The proposed materials of stucco, aluminum, and glass are not contextual with the original façade, the rooftop’s brick masonry, and the slate cladding, all of which will be obstructed or obliterated by this addition. Moreover, the roof’s historic William A. Underhill brick pavers, which are embedded with bronze plaques, would be trampled by this addition. This incongruous structure is an affront to the building’s overall appearance and will be visible from West 24th Street and the east side of Seventh Avenue. There is a clear case that this modification would detract from the historic character and qualities of the building which make it such a prominent landmark.

    An affront! Well, lucky for them, the commissioners agreed, according to Curbed. While they found some elements of the renovations to be appropriate and tasteful, even, the cabana up top gave them particular pause. The project has been sent away for more exploration, and likely alterations. It will be curious to see if anything al fresco is approved.

    http://www.observer.com/2012/04/none...er-should-you/

  5. #65
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    LPC rarely sends something away and then later turns it down in full. If they didn't want the rooftop addition to happen they more likely would have DENIED the application. However, in this case the application is quite broad, going well beyond the rooftop, so there's still a chance they'll carve that out and kill it for good.

  6. #66
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    Hotel Chelsea Too Big for Rooftop Extension, DOB Records Show

    By Mathew Katz

    CHELSEA — The Hotel Chelsea faces an uphill battle to get city approval for its controversial rooftop addition project — because the building is already as much as 30,000 square feet too big and five feet too tall for its zoned plot, according to Department of Buildings records.

    Filings show the legendary hotel at 222 W. 23rd St. hotel already has a total floor area of 166,770 square feet — more than 30,000 square feet larger than the 129,953 square feet allowed under current zoning rules.

    It's also 150 feet tall, above the allowable height of 145 feet, according to DOB documents.

    According to a DOB spokeswoman, the Hotel Chelsea was able to avoid violations for being larger than current zoning laws allow because it was built in the 1880s — before the zoning resolution went into effect.

    But DOB officials have repeatedly shot down applications by Hotel Chelsea owners the Chetrit Group to convert its rooftop space into a 150-person bar — most recently on May 3 — because the landlord provided it with inadequate information to determine if it complies with zoning regulations, a spokeswoman said.

    The Hotel's owners submitted a bid to build a 16-foot-high, 3,865-square-foot stucco addition onto its roof in October.
    Any new additions to the property would be subject to current zoning rules, a spokeswoman said.

    The DOB relies on the applications in order to determine square footage, but several discrepencies exist in applications filed by the renovation's architect, Gene Kaufman, on behalf of Chetrit Group, which owns the Hotel Chelsea.

    Different applications list different numbers for the building's existing size — in one application, the developers filed a proposed commercial zoning area of 90,702 square feet and a residential area of 79,331 square feet.

    That equals a total area of 170,033 square feet — almost 2,000 square feet more than the landlord's application lists it as 168,875, and far more than is allowed by zoning rules, according to DOB records. Other records include different estimates, with different final tallies.

    The building's landlord did not respond to requests for comment.

    The zoning conflict is the latest in a long line of controversy for the Chetrit Group, which has submitted numerous applications to expand the building's rooftop as part of its ongoing internal renovation.

    Despite vehement opposition to the expansion from concerned tenants and the local community board, the addition to the landmarked building was approved by the city's Landmarks Preservation Committee last month.

    Community Board 4 sent a letter to the DOB last week, saying the 16-foot addition would "increase its degree of non-compliance" with regulations.

    "The hotel is already overbuilt, so there's no room for a rooftop additional at the hotel," said CB4 Chair Corey Johnson at last week's full board meeting.

    Fewer than 100 tenants, which was a former home of stars including Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix, remain at the hotel, which shut to guests for the renovation in the fall.

    Since then, residents have complained of dangerous and unsanitary conditions as a result of ongoing construction work, including hazardous levels of dust, mold and lead in the air.

    In December, a judge ordered the building's owner to clean up the renovation, but on Sunday, a collection of tenants and elected officials said the hazards remain.

    Both the tenants and landlord were set to appear again in court Monday.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2012...#ixzz1uH1flKYn

  7. #67

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    Kaufman does enough damage to the city. There should be a restraining order keeping him away from all NYC landmarks.

  8. #68

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    I still say Sid didn't kill Nancy. And Valerie Solanas's eyes...

    Legends of Hotel Chelsea chronicled in new book that covers what inspired Andy Warhol, relegated Sid Vicious to 'junkies' floor' before he killed Nancy


    'Inside the Dream Palace: The Life and Times of New York's Legendary Chelsea Hotel' is the new book by Sherill Tippins that examines the cultural icons that stayed at the hotel, from Arthur C. Clarke to Sid Vicious.


    By Sherryl Connelly / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
    Saturday, November 16, 2013, 9:21 PM





    Hal Goldenberg/AP

    Attendants carry the body of 20-year-old Nancy Spungen, of Philadelphia, from the Hotel Chelsea in New York, allegedly stabbed to death by her boyfriend, The Sex Pistols' Sid Vicious.



    A new book, “Inside the Dream Palace: The Life and Times of New York’s Legendary Chelsea Hotel,” tells the absorbing story of the fabled New York hotel that has housed an excess of cultural icons — from Thomas Wolfe to Sid Vicious — through its many eras.


    Sherill Tippins, author of the equally compelling “February House: The Story of W.H. Auden, Carson McCullers, Jane and Paul Bowles, Benjamin Britten, and Gypsy Rose Lee, Under One Roof in Brooklyn,” makes elegant work of the Chelsea’s history.
    UPI

    Sid Vicious and his girlfriend Nancy Spungen.


    Now known as the Hotel Chelsea, at 222 W. 23rd St., it’s closed to new residents and under renovation. No one yet knows what the next chapter will be.
    But “Inside the Dream Palace,” on sale Dec. 3, tells of its glorious past in comprehensive detail with revealing anecdotes that brand the hotel as unique. Some of Tippins’ richest material is harvested from the famous names that made the Chelsea their home.
    John Peodincuk/New York Daily News

    Warhol’s movie “Chelsea Girls” was inspired by the hotel, and scenes were filmed in its rooms. After Sedgwick — alienated from Warhol and her addiction deepening — made the Chelsea her home, she set her room on fire.


    And there were more than a few.
    In 1962, Arthur Miller, escaping the headlines in the aftermath of his divorce from Marilyn Monroe, became a hotel resident. It was there he wrote “After the Fall,” the play about his marriage to Monroe, which opened to scathing reviews.



    Cover of "Inside the Dream Palace: The Life and Times of New York's Legendary Chelsea Hotel" by Sherill Tippins.


    During that time, the hotel’s legendary manager, Stanley Bard, reluctantly agreed to allow the famed writer and drinker Brendan Behan to ostensibly dry out there. Miller would visit and find Behan, flat on his back, his huge belly forming a mound, lisping through broken teeth.




    AP

    Bob Dylan rented a room near the woman he would soon secretly marry, Sara Lowndes, “and though quite famous in 1965, he would slip through the carnival-like atmosphere of the lobby unrecognized.” It was there he wrote songs for “Blonde on Blonde.”


    On the top floor, Arthur C. Clarke was working on the “2001: A Space Odyssey” screenplay for Stanley Kubrick. The two Arthurs would break away from work to have breakfast at the Automat.
    Bob Dylan rented a room near the woman he would soon secretly marry, Sara Lowndes, “and though quite famous in 1965, he would slip through the carnival-like atmosphere of the lobby unrecognized.” It was there he wrote songs for “Blonde on Blonde.” A story circulated about the night he spent passed out on the floor as his drinking buddies Brian Jones, Mick Jagger and other musicians partied on.

    Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images

    In the late 1960s, Leonard Cohen spent the night in the Chelsea Hotel with Janis Joplin.


    Edie Sedgwick, Andy Warhol’s nihilistic “superstar,” was soon hanging around. She had a thing for Dylan, and Warhol took it as a betrayal.


    Warhol’s movie “Chelsea Girls” was inspired by the hotel, and scenes were filmed in its rooms. After Sedgwick — alienated from Warhol and her addiction deepening — made the Chelsea her home, she set her room on fire.

    David McLane/New York Daily News

    Sherill Tippins, author of the equally compelling “February House: The Story of W.H. Auden, Carson McCullers, Jane and Paul Bowles, Benjamin Britten, and Gypsy Rose Lee, Under One Roof in Brooklyn,” makes elegant work of the Chelsea’s history.


    A bellman carried her to the lobby, where a disgusted staff left her shivering, nude under a blanket as everyone else evacuated.
    One night in the late 1960s, Leonard Cohen realized the woman on the elevator next to him was Janis Joplin. He asked her, “Are you looking for someone?”

    The Estate of David Gahr/Getty Images
    Singer Janis Joplin on the roof garden of the Chelsea Hotel in June 1970.



    She said, “Yes, I’m looking for Kris Kristofferson?”

    RELATED: CHELSEA HOTEL OUTAGE SPARKS RAGE
    The Estate of David Gahr/Getty Images

    Playwright Sam Shepard and singer and poet Patti Smith pose for a portrait at the Hotel Chelsea in 1971.


    “Little lady, you’re in luck,” Cohen responded. “I am Kris Kristofferson.”
    Joplin cackled and the two spent the night together. Cohen would later record “Chelsea Hotel No. 2,” in which he referred to their “unmade bed.”
    Frank Russo/New York Daily News

    Detective Frederick Stepat and policewoman McCarthy escort Valeria Solanas,28,into 13th pct, for the shooting of pop art movie man Andy Warhol.


    In 1967, Arthur Miller tried to warn the hotel management that one of its residents, Valerie Solanas, was a clear and present danger. The crazed woman was always lurking about demanding residents buy her pamphlet, “The SCUM Manifesto.”
    Miller was ignored. Finally evicted from the hotel for failing to pay rent, Solanas took to haunting the hallways, huddling in corners. Furious that Warhol favored another Chelsea resident, the “superstar” Viva, Solanas shot Warhol at the Factory on June 3, 1968.
    Rick Maiman/AP

    The Chelsea Hotel has offered short and long-term shelter for some of the world's most celebrated artists including Bob Dylan, Andy Warhol, Arthur Miller and Eugene O'Neil.


    Patti Smith had already moved out of the Chelsea in 1970 when she fell hard for the drummer in the band Holy Modal Rounders. He introduced himself as Slim Shadow and welcomed her to his seventh-floor room with a balcony at the Chelsea. It was only after they became a couple that he revealed his true identity: He had a wife and a newborn child at home — and he was a playwright who’d won multiple Obies.
    He was Sam Shepard.

    Dee Dee Ramone detoxed from heroin at the Hotel Chelsea and later wrote the novel “Chelsea Horror Hotel.” But indisputably, the most famous punks to bunk at the Chelsea were Nancy Spungen and Sid Vicious of the Sex Pistols. At that point in time, the first floor was known as the “junkies’ floor,” and after Vicious collapsed in the lobby from a drug overdose, that’s where the hotel manager moved the couple.

    A bellman, responding to an anonymous call, entered room 100 on Oct. 12, 1978, and found Spungen’s blood-smeared body, in a black bra and panties, on the floor. She was lying faceup, her head under the sink. There was a knife wound in her abdomen. Spungen and Vicious had been holed up, awash in drugs and money from a rumored royalty check.
    Vicious was charged with murder, but died of a seeming overdose four months later.

    The question of who murdered Spungen is an ongoing controversy.
    Critics accused the police of never looking past Vicious for a suspect, and not caring much about the death of a sexually provocative woman in a seedy hotel.

    The deaths of Nancy and Sid were “catastrophic” for the hotel, Tippins reports. But artists such as Julian Schnabel and Francesco Clemente and musicians like Rufus Wainwright, Marianne Faithfull and Madonna still came and went.
    A last, lovely detail is that Ethan Hawke and his children were given a free suite for a month after his marriage to Uma Thurman ended.
    Stanley Bard provided the digs with the condition that Hawke try to get Thurman back.
    Hawke later directed the 2001 movie “Chelsea Walls,” about a single day at the hotel. It had 35 characters.


    Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/entertain...#ixzz2kuhUFqso

  9. #69
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    ...Kaufman claimed that the continuing use of his designs without his oversight could "cause irreparable damage" to his reputation...




    Former Hotel Chelsea Architect Wants to Halt Renovation

    By Mathew Katz

    The architect who was once behind the massive and controversial renovation of the historic Hotel Chelsea says its new owners are using his design without his permission.

    Architect Gene Kaufman, who designed a renovation to the hotel while it was owned by Joseph Chetrit, is seeking a court injunction to stop work being done by new owners King & Grove to transform the Chelsea into a luxury hotel.

    In a lawsuit filed in New York State Supreme Court on May 2, Kaufman claimed that the continuing use of his designs without his oversight could "cause irreparable damage" to his reputation and open him up to "liability claims that could result in damages in the hundreds of millions of dollars."

    He also demanded an injunction to stop the current construction until the new owners file "new architectural and engineering plans with the Department of Buildings in connection with the Project."
    The suit also claims that King & Grove owes Kaufman $80,000 in back fees for his work on the hotel.

    King & Grove, a luxury chain of hotels owned by Ed Scheetz, bought the Hotel Chelsea from Joseph Chetrit in the summer of 2013, largely putting an end to a nearly two-year period where tenants complained that the renovation was destroying their homes.

    Scheetz, who also owns the McCarren Hotel in Williamsburg, rebranded the chain under the name "Chelsea Hotels" on Thursday.

    The company brought in Marvel Architects to significantly overhaul Kaufman's plan shortly after the purchase. According to Department of Buildings records, Marvel filed its own plans for the building in August 2013.

    "We terminated [Gene Kaufman Architect] last fall and hired Marvel Architects to redesign the plan in a manner consistent with our vision for the restoration of the Chelsea," said Felice Jiang, a spokeswoman for the hotel chain, in a statement.

    "Just as we have been making changes to improve the conditions at the Chelsea, Marvel Architects has had a proven track record when it comes to preservation and sensitive redevelopment."

    Jiang added that the company already offered to pay the outstanding $80,000 and has the money in an escrow account, but Kaufman refused payment and demanded he get credit for the design of the Chelsea.

    "We are happy to pay him what he is owed; however, we’re unable to give him credit for any aspect of the restoration of the Chelsea as it would be false and violate the vision and integrity of the Chelsea," she said.

    While Kaufman supervised the renovation between May 2011 and March 2013, tenants living in the building suffered what they called "unlivable" conditions filled with dust, mold and burst pipes.

    The tenants filed a lawsuit against former owner Joseph Chetrit and in May 2012, a judge ordered Chetrit to clean up and repair damage from the renovation.

    Kaufman and Chetrit also came under fire from tenants and Community Board 4 when they sought approval to build a 150-person rooftop bar near residents' apartments.

    A spokeswoman for Kaufman did not respond to requests for comment.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2014...alt-renovation

  10. #70
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    GK might want to be careful when making claims about his reputation ...

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