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  1. #31

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    Rumors of Hell's Kitchen Store Closing Fuel Family Feud Updated 47 mins ago


    February 28, 2011 7:36pm

    The owner's daughter denies rumors that Manganero's Grosseria Italiana is set to close.




    Manganaro's Grosseria Italiana at 488 Ninth Avenue, which sits next to its wood-panelled rival, Manganaro's Hero Boy at 492-494. (DNAinfo/Leila Molana-Allen)

    By Leila Molana-Allen
    DNAinfo Reporter/Producer

    HELL'S KITCHEN — After a "For Sale" sign went up in the window at Manganaro's Grosseria Italiana last week, several news outlets reported that the Hell's Kitchen institution was set to close after more than a century in business.

    But now the owner's daughter is denying the closure, and the "For Sale" has been removed.

    Owner Salvatore Dell'Orto told the Wall Street Journal on Sunday that after he became ill last year, he started to worry that his five daughters would not be able to run the store, at 488 Ninth Ave., on their own. "We've had it," he told the paper.

    Inside the once thriving store, the shelves were almost bare Monday, with only a few items in the freezer. In the small seating area at the back sat only two customers, although it was the middle of the lunchtime rush.

    When asked to comment on the purportedly imminent closure, the proprietress, one of the two of Dell'Orte's five daughters who still run the shop, turned her back with a curt, "Have a nice day." She then spat out, "It's you [reporters] that's f**ked it all up. We're not closing, that's the point." She refused, however, to discuss the matter any further.

    The store has become notorious for this kind of behavior in recent years. Multiple restaurant review and blog sites such as Yelp and Menu Pages feature comments about the surly customer service.

    One comment posted on midtownlunch.com reads, "There's no excuse for rude service and over-priced food. Let this dinosaur go extinct."

    It's a very different story at the sandwich shop next door, Manganaro's Hero Boy, which is co-owned by Anthony Dell'Orte, oldest son of Salvatore's brother James. That store has expanded to fill a double lot on the street and recently had a $180,000 refit. The shelves are heaving with merchandise.

    Anthony believes that customer service is one of the main reasons for the decline of the grocery next door. "We've made changes and kept up with the market, while they've sat on their laurels and hoped people will walk through the door. And then when they do, they yell at them! I get three or four customers a day who say they've been yelled at next door."

    Manganaro's Grosseria Italiana originally opened as Petrucci's Wine and Spirits in 1893, but the name was changed after the current owner's uncle bought the store in 1919, turning it into a traditional Italian grocery store to cater to the needs of the surrounding immigrant population.

    When the family opened a sandwich shop next door in 1956, Manganaro's Hero Boy, they split the ownership of the two businesses between their four sons.

    Together, they designed the 6-foot Hero sandwich, called the Hero Boy, which became the main attraction of the businesses.

    But soon the sandwich shop and the grocery store began to compete for customers, sparking a now more than 50-year-old feud between the owner of Manganaro's Hero Boy, 74-year-old James Dell'Orto, and his brother Salvatore, the owner of the grocery.

    The two brothers have not spoken in more than 10 years — except through lawyers — as they negotiated a series of complex legal battles revolving around the name Manganaro's and whether the grocery store should be allowed to refer to their own sandwiches as Manganaro's Hero Boy sandwiches.

    A judgement from a 1989 trial written by Justice Harold Baer, read, "An arrangement by which the parties combine their skills, energies and market strength, to say nothing of their ingenuity, would seem to make more sense than continued combat, which only saps the health of the brothers and the two businesses and aids their competitors."

    But the two family factions have been unable to let bygones be bygones.

    "They do what they do. We don't have any contact," Anthony said as he worked in the sandwich shop on Monday.

    As to whether the grocery store would actually close and the building be sold, he said he had his doubts. "Ten years ago, after the settlement [in which Salvatore was ordered to pay James $422,000 in damages for violating a 1989 judgement], they said they were going close. So I don't believe they'll close now," he said.



  2. #32
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Seems like the grocery owners are a little too bitter.....

  3. #33

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    I live right there... the story has it backwards- Leila and Allen must be good friends with the owners of Heroboy- because that's the place that actually sucks- and they truly treat you badly...
    The Grosseria is the place for good food and no unsettling mistreatment

  4. #34

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    I wish that the dumpy gas station on 10th Ave. between 44th and 45th could be incorporated into the Studio City project. It's a blighted eyesore left over from the days when this area was not nice.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by scumonkey View Post
    I live right there... the story has it backwards- Leila and Allen must be good friends with the owners of Heroboy- because that's the place that actually sucks- and they truly treat you badly...
    The Grosseria is the place for good food and no unsettling mistreatment
    Thanks for the correction.

  6. #36
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Public Hearing Slated for Hell's Kitchen Rezoning

    West-side residents can weigh in on a plan to bring more housing and business to the area at a Wednesday night hearing.

    By Tara Kyle


    The proposed rezoning is bounded by 43rd and 55th Streets and Twelfth Avenue.
    On the East, it skirts between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues.


    HELL'S KITCHEN — West Side residents, business owners and other stakeholders will get their chance to weigh in on an 18-block rezoning proposal at a public hearing Wednesday night.

    The chief goals of the West Clinton Rezoning plan include bringing more housing and commerce to the once desolate vicinity of Eleventh Avenue.

    If passed, the proposal would, for the first time, impose a height limit on development in the area, bounded by 43rd and 55th Street. It would also outlaw hotels and prevent new strip clubs from moving in — patrons of existing gentleman's establishments, fear not — you can stay.

    The public hearing, slated for 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at Roosevelt Hospital at 1000 Tenth Avenue, is one piece of the city's seven-month public review period, formally known as the Uniform Land Use Review Process (ULURP).

    After the neighborhood weighs in, Community Board 4 will issue a vote on its recommendations. The next step for the rezoning proposal is Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer's office, followed by the City Planning Commission, City Council and Mayor.

    One lingering issue likely to dominate the conversation is the lack of anti-harassment protections for people living between Eleventh and Twelfth Avenues, in the current proposal. Without provisions of this kind, many neighborhood activists say landlords can try to force out tenants without fear of penalties.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20110301/chel...#ixzz1FQtogwC3

  7. #37
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Heh heh.... strip clubs.

  8. #38
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    450 Million Years Ago, Hell’s Kitchen Earned Its Name

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP


















    McMahon Hall on Fordham's Lincoln Center campus


    Amtrak rail cut near 10th Avenue and 38th Street

    “That’s ancestral North America out there,” said Sidney Horenstein, the geologist and environmental educator emeritus of the American Museum of Natural History, gesturing broadly toward the towers of mid-Manhattan. “Here, we’re on this exotic continent that collided with it.”

    Exotic is the word. The rock outcrop that emerges like the tip of a geological iceberg from the children’s playground in DeWitt Clinton Park, at West 52nd Street and 12th Avenue, is an astonishing work of natural sculpture; utterly sensuous — almost sensual in spots — with smooth curves and bubbly folds and veinous striations that look too organic to have been formed of schist, gneiss and amphibolite.

    Still, that’s not what Mr. Horenstein means when he uses the word “exotic.” This outcrop near the Hudson River is what geologists call an exotic terrane, a fragment of the crust from one tectonic plate that has been sutured onto another and therefore differs in its composition from the surrounding rock. The only other visible example of this particular terrane in New York City, Mr. Horenstein said, is at Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx.

    The collision that grafted this terrane onto North America occurred roughly 450 million years ago, he said. (That would explain why I don’t recall covering it for The Times. I was still a news clerk back then.)

    What prompted the meeting with Mr. Horenstein is that bedrock is back in the news, thanks in part to a Jan. 17 post by Matt Chaban of The New York Observer: “Uncanny Valley: The Real Reason There Are No Skyscrapers in the Middle of Manhattan.”

    For many years, the “valley” in New York’s skyline has been explained to some degree by the presence or absence of bedrock close enough to street level that towers could be anchored to it. Christopher J. Schuberth described the phenomenon in “The Geology of New York City and Environs” (1968):

    The skyscrapers of New York City are clustered together into the midtown group, where the bedrock is within several feet of the surface, and the downtown group, where the bedrock again reappears to within 40 feet of the surface near Wall Street.
    The Observer highlighted a study published late last year in The Journal of Economic History by Jason Barr, an associate professor at Rutgers University; Troy Tassier, an associate professor at Fordham University; and Rossen Trendafilov, a teaching fellow at Fordham. “Our results showed that bedrock had, at most, a small effect on the formation of the skyline,” the authors concluded. “Real estate developers built skyscrapers to be near already established centers of commerce, where public transportation was easily accessible, and away from slums and manufacturing districts.”


    Part of an “exotic terrane” visible in DeWitt Clinton Park on the far West Side

    Whatever its role in urban development, I wanted to find out more about the bedrock just a few feet underfoot in Midtown and Downtown, beginning with: can you see any of it outside of parkland? Mr. Horenstein said he knew of no outcrops in Lower Manhattan but that it was still visible in a few spots around mid-Manhattan, including some exposures along the Amtrak rail cut paralleling 10th and 11th Avenues.

    Off I went, armed with just enough rudimentary information to be dangerous, like the fact that the three principal rock types underlying New York City are Fordham gneiss, Manhattan schist and Inwood marble. Wow! Could that chalky, crumbly, whitish-gray patch just north of the 37th Street overpass be a little-known vein of Inwood marble?

    Mr. Horenstein assumed the benevolent smile of one who’s been asked such questions before. Many times before. “No,” he said patiently. “It’s cement.” He identified the rest of it as Manhattan schist, manifesting little excitement as he did so.

    The exotic terrane, on the other, elicited much affectionate perusal. “It’s one of my favorites,” Mr. Horenstein allowed. That’s no small compliment from a man who earned his bachelor’s degree in geology from Hunter College in 1958 and spent 45 years on the staff of the American Museum of Natural History.

    He explained that the outcrop was made of metamorphic rock that was formed 15 to 20 miles beneath the earth’s surface. Even though the layers were once horizontal, the tremendous pressures exerted on them were such that they emerged in a vertical array, with folds so tight they almost look like ripples in soft fabric rather than unforgiving rock. Mr. Horenstein pointed out areas where the gneiss and the schist had deformed around the harder strata of amphibolite, as a viscous liquid might make its way slowly around a dam.

    “Think of layers of wax that are just squeezed,” Mr. Horenstein said. “Even when it’s weathered, you can see all those convolutions.” The marvels continued, as a granitic substance filled in the cracks after the deformation, creating delicate traceries. Retreating glacial ice finally gave the whole thing a terrific polish that endures to this day.

    Mr. Horenstein and I met on this outcrop of an exotic continent to talk about skyscrapers. But as our focus was drawn more and more into the rocky folds, the skyscrapers of modern New York seemed very distant.


    At the Amtrak rail cut on 39th Street, between 10th and 11th Avenues,
    one can see how very close bedrock is to the street level of mid-Manhattan.
    This outcrop is Manhattan schist.


    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...er=rss&emc=rss

  9. #39
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Park Near Lincoln Tunnel Proposed by Hell's Kitchen Groups


    By Mathew Katz






    HELL'S KITCHEN — The path to the Lincoln Tunnel could soon become a bit more green.

    Community groups have come together to propose a park running along Dyer Avenue — the street that brings vehicles to and from the tunnel — between Ninth and 10th avenues.

    The park would span the east side of the street, between West 34th and 35th streets, taking up the space equivalent to roughly three lanes. Only one of the lanes is currently in use — the lane leading to the tunnel — while one is a traffic island and the other is unused.

    A group of neighborhood organizations, including the Hell's Kitchen Neighborhood Association and CHEKPEDS came up with the plan over the summer.

    The first parts of the proposal — shifting all the lanes to the west and getting rid of the median to make room for the park — will come before Community Board 4's Transportation Committee at its meeting Wednesday night.

    Any changes to the street would require the blessing of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which owns Dyer Avenue. The Port Authority did not respond to requests for comment.

    The street currently has three lanes leading out of the tunnel and one leading in. According to supporters, the Port Authority plans to remove one outbound lane to reduce traffic to West 34th Street's Select Bus Service lane, meaning the park's creation would not create any more traffic.

    "The proposal would only use leftover space, it would not take away any lanes of traffic," said Christine Berthet, the committee chair.

    "This is really a request to organize the leftover parts."

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2012...kitchen-groups

  10. #40
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    Park Near Lincoln Tunnel Kicks Into High Gear with Community Board Approval

    by Mathew Katz

    HELL'S KITCHEN — A plan for a park at the current entrance to the Lincoln Tunnel would create roughly 7,200 square feet of space for the community to enjoy along traffic-clogged Dyer Avenue, supporters said Wednesday night. At a meeting of Community Board 4, both board members and residents praised the idea for the Dyer Avenue green space — though a plan to make it a reality is still in the early stages.

    The plan for the Port Authority-owned land would convert three lanes between West 34th and 35th streets into a park, creating green space where residents say it's sorely lacking. To make it work, organizers would have to remove both a concrete median and traffic light at the location, at a cost of roughly $15,000 to $20,000 that has yet to be raised.

    Community Board 4 unanimously recommended the plan to the Port Authority Wednesday, but said the coalition of tenants and transit advocacy groups that came up with the proposal, which lacks a formal name, still has much more work to do.

    "We want them to host public forums, a minimum of two, kind of like the High Line did," said Jay Marcus, co-chairman of CB4's Transportation Committee.

    "They also should not move forward until they raise the money to remove the median and traffic light. We want a full budget — the Port Authority has no money for this."

    The Port Authority plans to remove one of the four lanes of traffic regardless of whether the plan goes forward, meaning the park would not take away any car space on its own.

    "We've made a tremendous amount of progress so far," said Jeffrey Peyser, who's part of the effort to create the park.

    "We've done outreach for corporate sponsorship to fund the initial aspects of the park and are working on getting matching grant programs."

    Meta Brunzema, an architect who helped create the initial design for the park, said that despite its tiny size, the green space would include new trees, seating areas and other amenities.

    "Our group's intent was really to make this a park for everybody — for seniors, for people with disabilities, for young people, for old people," she said.

    "The goal here is to make a real park."

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/2013...board-approval

  11. #41
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Well...it IS green...


    Eyes on the Street: From Parking to Parklet in Hell’s Kitchen

    by Brad Aaron



    Courtesy of Christine Berthet of CHEKPEDS, here are photos of what could be Manhattan’s newest public space, a pocket park on Dyer Avenue in Hell’s Kitchen.

    This plaza, conceived by area residents, occupies a sliver of traffic island on Dyer between 34th and 35th Streets, near the entrance to the Lincoln Tunnel. The space was formerly used for motorcycle parking.

    Berthet says this is an interim installation, since plans are on hold to convert three lanes of leftover asphalt on Dyer into a park.



    See the before shot after the jump.



    http://www.streetsblog.org/2013/05/0...hells-kitchen/

  12. #42

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    Who wants to enjoy the day by sitting next to tunnel traffic exhaust?

  13. #43

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    But it's still an improvement over the current conditions.

  14. #44
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The Bloombergian-Burdenian idea of open space for the masses. Particulate matter free of charge.

    In a civilized society someone with the power and money of this little man would have used some of the past 12 years to free this city from the tyranny of poison spewing vehicles.

  15. #45

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    In all fairness to the mayor, he tried to do this, but Sheldon, The Huge Putz," Silver and others blocked him. NY should have a massive congestion charge, but it will never happen because "the poor" in outer boroughs will characterize it as a campaign against them.

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