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Thread: 1775 Broadway - by William Welles Bosworth / Shreve & Lamb - Reclad+Renov by Gensler

  1. #46
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    ^ The customers want floor-to-ceiling windows and a "like new" building. The greedy developer will get higher rents because of that.

    He is also kicking out more interesting tenants like the Comedy Club for a bank branch because of higher rents also.

  2. #47
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    There is no way that 1775 will ever have "floor to ceiling windows" unless they rip out 30% + of the existing bricks and knock major holes all around.

    Right now this building is solid masonry with standard size pre-war windows.

  3. #48
    Kings County Loyal BrooklynLove's Avatar
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    just doesn't seem sensible then to go with the condom setup. maybe that rendering is showing a morph type of effect for exhibition purposes - combining the before and after at once for wow factor, not for showing the actual final product.

  4. #49

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    ^You mean to say a misleading rendering? Ha! Dream on, that NEVER happens.

  5. #50
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    This city's obsession with shiny glass walls continues...

    Global Ad Agency Moving to Far West of Manhattan


    By TERRY PRISTIN
    Published: January 9, 2008

    Ogilvy & Mather, the international advertising and public relations agency, said Tuesday that it would move its headquarters to 636 11th Avenue, at 47th Street, becoming one of the first corporate tenants to embrace that stretch of the Far West Side of Manhattan.

    Ogilvy, a division of the WPP Group, has leased the entire 11-story building. The building’s interior will be redesigned, with a new lobby and glass curtain wall, said Ben Hakimian, the managing partner of the Hakimian Organization, one of the owners. Since 11th Avenue is several blocks from the subway lines at Eighth Avenue, a shuttle bus will ferry employees from train stations and the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

    Ogilvy’s move will empty out nearly 600,000 square feet of noncontiguous space at Worldwide Plaza, on Eighth Avenue and 50th Street, when the lease expires in July 2009. That building’s beleaguered landlord, Harry B. Macklowe, must now search for new tenants at a time when there is concern about possible layoffs in the financial services industry as a result of the subprime mortgage crisis. Mr. Macklowe and his son, William S. Macklowe, had no comment Tuesday.

    Mr. Macklowe acquired Worldwide Plaza in February as part of a $7 billion portfolio and is facing a deadline next month to pay back about $6.4 billion in short-term loans. Brokers say the Macklowes are asking an annual rent of $100 a square foot for the Worldwide Plaza space being vacated by Ogilvy. Ogilvy’s rent at 636 11th Avenue will be “in the low $50’s,” Mr. Hakimian said.

    Carla Hendra, the co-chief executive of Ogilvy New York, said the agency also had other reasons to move. At Worldwide Plaza, Ogilvy’s home for two decades, the space is divided into private offices, but today many companies prefer an open plan. “The building just doesn’t suit us anymore,” Ms. Hendra said. The company rejected the idea of renovating the space because of the “astronomical” cost, she said.

    Ogilvy’s new home is near the 222-room Vu Hotel, between 46th and 47th Streets, being developed by the Kimpton Hotel and Restaurant Group. It is also a few blocks north of the site of the large-scale mixed-use development proposed for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority railyards. “The development of the Far West Side is well under way,” Ms. Hendra said. “By 2009, this is not going to seem to be pioneering.”

    Built in 1913, 636 11th Avenue originally housed the Auerbach Chocolate Factory. Mr. Hakimian, who bought the property with Peykar Brothers Realty and Gorijan Properties in 2005, said he originally planned to convert it into a residential building. But his brokers convinced him that there was a demand among office tenants in creative industries for some of the features the building offered, like 13-foot ceilings, access to a roof overlooking the Hudson River and an interior courtyard.

    Mitchell Konsker, a vice chairman at Cushman & Wakefield, said Ogilvy’s move would encourage other tenants to move to the neighborhood. “This bellwether transaction legitimizes 11th Avenue as a corporate corridor,” said Mr. Konsker, who led the team representing the landlord. The ad agency was represented by CB Richard Ellis.

    Mr. Konsker also predicted that the Macklowes would easily find a tenant for Worldwide Plaza because of the shortage of large blocks of space in Midtown Manhattan.

    Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

  6. #51
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Aren't the windows here large enough and numerous enough for them? What's the need for an "all-glass curtain wall?"

    I just hope they leave that fabulous entrance alone, at least.

    Here's 636 Eleventh Ave., from the outside, a perfectly handsome building, no need for a complete makeover.



    God, so much of the general public is still so behind, so unsophisticated and so tasteless when it comes to buildings.

  7. #52
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    That's beautiful, what a shame it will be hacked apart and glassed over.

  8. #53

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    This is a cool industrial-chic building that you'd expect a young, creative, company, to move in to. With no need to cover the thing in glass for God's sake.

    What is Ogilvy & Mather doing here? From World-WidePlaza to this? I'm surprised.

    If they'd leave the exterior as is, it would give them a hipper image.

  9. #54
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Ogilvy & Mather were considered pioneers by moving into WW plaza in 1990. I think they're continuing their search of cheap rent by moving further west.

  10. #55
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Get out your sun glasses (and barf bags) ...

    Meanwhile, in Architectural Abominations

    CURBED
    January 28, 2008
    by Joey



    For those who didn't hear the news (and if you didn't, you're in for quite the surprise), the Moinian Group
    is changing the address of the Newsweek building at 1775 Broadway to 3 Columbus Circle.
    Oh, and they're replacing the classic pre-war brick façade with glass. All glass. So much glass!
    It's all part of a $60 million makeover meant to bring new blood to the office building, which is losing
    both Newsweek and Comedy Central as tenants. The Moinian Group also launched a website touting
    the new-look tower, featuring what has to be the most offensively horrid piece of music ever
    recorded by Enya. Just ... wow. Some renderings after the jump, including the new
    signature rooftop signage that can be all yours.


    The new entrance and lobby.


    Terraces and a branding opportunity.


    OK, the view ain't bad. Looking at the building, however, is another story.

    · 3 Columbus Circle [Official Site]

  11. #56
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Smile

    The trees in the Broadway median are getting big.

  12. #57

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    I just read this at Curbed.
    This is ****ing Heinous. An LPC petition could be made- there are very few of these buildings with this type of massing in the city- fewer still by SL&H.
    Geez developers are morons.

  13. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wrightfan View Post
    I just read this at Curbed.
    This is ****ing Heinous. An LPC petition could be made- there are very few of these buildings with this type of massing in the city- fewer still by SL&H.
    Geez developers are morons.
    ugh....there goes the new york character

  14. #59

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    February 20, 2008, 10:21 am Switching Brands in the Skyline

    By David W. Dunlap

    The General Motors Building has already been renamed.

    Harry Macklowe, the owner of the current General Motors Building on Fifth Avenue, made news last week by suggesting that buyers might reap tens of millions of dollars in extra income through the sale of naming rights to the building.

    Less noticed was that the old General Motors Building at 1775 Broadway, more recently known as the Newsweek Building, was recently renamed 3 Columbus Circle as part of an extreme makeover by its owner, the Moinian Group.

    (It should be noted that 3 Columbus Circle has no frontage on Columbus Circle. Instead, it sits on a block bounded by Broadway, Eighth Avenue, 57th and 58th Streets.)

    A new glass facade designed by the firm Gensler will obliterate evidence of the building’s history and heritage as a hub of Automobile Row. For now, a palisade of three-story Ionic columns, supporting a neo-Classical entablature, surrounds the base of the structure. This is a visible vestige of the Colonnade Building, designed by William Welles Bosworth and developed by John A. Harriss, a deputy police commissioner who also invested in real estate.

    Describing the plan in February 1921, The Times noted that the columns would not be flattened in order to increase the size of the storefronts between them: “They will be set back from the building line several inches, and a statistician could figure out without much difficulty how much prospective rent Dr. Harriss might lose by using this space for attractive architectural treatment instead of sacrificing certain artistic elements for the almighty dollar.”

    Tenants were drawn to the building all the same, as Broadway was the heart of the automotive industry in New York City. In 1922, the Hudson Motor Car Company leased the Colonnade Building’s principal storefront, at Broadway and 57th Street, as a sales room for its Essex line of automobiles. (In recent decades, this space was the home of Coliseum Books. It is now a Bank of America branch.)

    Until 1926, the three-story colonnade was all that stood on the site. Then, Shreve & Lamb designed a 22-story addition, principally for the General Motors Corporation. “The tenant will not only establish its Eastern executive and clerical headquarters in the new building,” The Times reported, “but arrangements will be made for private dining rooms, club rooms, barber shop and a board room seating 40 directors of the corporation.”

    General Motors projected its name on the skyline from the top of the building. (That sign position, currently used by CNN, is offered by Moinian as an opportunity for “significant corporate branding.”) Eventually, G.M. occupied almost all of the building. It stayed there until 1968, when it moved across town to Fifth Avenue.

    General Motors’ next move, my colleague Charles V. Bagli reports, will be to the Citigroup Center, where it is taking 135,000 square feet on a 10-year lease beginning next summer. Don’t hold your breath for a name change there.

    Shreve & Lamb’s brown-brick facade was far simpler than the monumental colonnade. That incongruous combination of ornate base and spartan tower still speaks subtly — to anyone patient enough to listen — about the rise of Automobile Row in the early 20th century. But in a few months, it will be gone; another quirky corner of Manhattan that has been scrubbed, smoothed, polished, branded and lost.



    The General Motors building, left, as it appeared soon after construction, seen from Columbus Circle. At right, the building, now known as the Newsweek Building or 3 Columbus Circle, as it appears today, with the CNN rooftop sign. (Drawing by J. W. Golinkin in “Towers of Manhattan,” 1928, and photo by David W. Dunlap/The New York Times)




    The General Motors Building as it looks today from 57th Street and Broadway. (Photo: David W. Dunlap/The New York Times)


    Renamed 3 Columbus Circle, this is what the building will look like with a new glass curtain wall. (Photo: Gensler for the Moinian Group)

  15. #60

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    If the newsweek building is getting a new facade, shouldn't the old facade be removed first? The renovation reminds me of what they did to the old Hotel Commodore.

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