Page 9 of 32 FirstFirst ... 567891011121319 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 135 of 479

Thread: 1775 Broadway - by William Welles Bosworth / Shreve & Lamb - Reclad+Renov by Gensler

  1. #121
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    It's a very '50's mentality about making something look 'modern'.

  2. #122
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    You see this all over downtown -- NoHo, Financial District, SoHo -- where idiots have chopped away solid stone -- marble, granite , limestone -- to smooth out beautiul old details -- cornices, carvings, moldings -- to allow for a new "modern" face to be put onto the building. When the "modern" junk is removed it's apparent that the damage is nearly irreparable unless someone has really DEEP pockets.

    Case in point: The entry to 5 Beekman Street between Park Row / Nassau, where renovation is currently underway. The entrie newly-exposed original granite entryway is covered with 2" diameter / 12' long drill marks where the deep relief of the the old carved stone was chiseled down to a semi-level surface. What remains is a scarred & chopped mess. It's nearly unfixable.

    So don't hold out any fantasies about 1775 ever being restored to it's original glory. All the stone there -- pillars, cornices, moldings -- is being chopped to bits.

  3. #123

    Default

    I can't hardly tell if this building is being recladded or being demolished.

  4. #124

    Default

    I remember David Dunlap of the Times wrote a while ago that this was the first home of GM... Is that true? If so, you'd think that would've qualified this for landmark designation.

  5. #125
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    In this day and age nothing gets landmarked unless the back room deal has been cut.

    In a less crass world this one would definitely have been a likely candidate for protection.

    But crass is what we have become and crass is what we get.

  6. #126

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stroika View Post
    Good sense will prevail in the end. 50 years from now, when the city looks like Houston, the grid is gone and tower-in-the-park superblocks of mega-projects are the norm, New York will be so misshapen and ugly that companies and residents will move out in droves. Only then, some sensible developer (let's assume such a being exists) will realize that having a decent-looking, solidly built building that somewhat resembles the way humanity built things for hundreds of years before deciding glass, plastic and pre-cast limestone/brick will actually attract people and tenants and make you money. Then they'll take down the absurd-looking glass claptrap and restore the building. And the dozens of surrounding all-glass buildings will finally have something other than another glass building to reflect on their walls.
    What is with your obsession with comparing everything to Houston? New York will never be Houston. We just don't have the space to have all those towers in the park and huge boulevards. No doubt this recladding is an abomination but saying New York will turn into Houston or anything like it is ridiculous.

  7. #127
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    Houston = worst possible scenario (followed closely by Dallas).

  8. #128

    Default

    I passed by on Friday en route to meeting with a professor at Fordham and when boarding the D for 42nd... it already looks ungodly.

  9. #129
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    2,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stroika View Post
    If so, you'd think that would've qualified this for landmark designation.
    Pretty much any building that is over 30 yrs old can be landmarked. Even ruinous ones. I mean just the fact that One Chaze Plaza got LM designation goes to show that it has nothing to do with actual architectural merit. All it takes is the right people to get involved, or else do you really think that a tower that destroyed the DT skyline and symbolizes the degradation of architectural design would have made it through for designation. I dont think so.

  10. #130

    Default

    ^^ Yep. Although the Silver Towers obviously have their own thread, it's worth mentioning them here too. They 1) are a little taste of Soviet Moscow in Greenwich Village; and 2) in their landmark designation, they cut off the only undeveloped land in the area for NYU's use. Given the Purple Menace's stated ambitions to build many more dorms, rather than build one or two tall dorms along the Silver Towers (with the bonus effect of hiding the Towers!), we can now count on NYU razing dozens of beautiful, older, smaller buildings all over the Village to build many shorter, oafier, landscraper buildings.

    But at least we'll have lots of "open space" to admire -- like it or not -- Brezhnev/Pei's architectural legacy! Thanks, Uncle Tierney!

  11. #131
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    NYU = McSam.

  12. #132

    Default

    Every computer in Local Government should have this photograph set as its wallpaper.



    Pity there's not a way to do it.

    I could cry looking at this wanton destruction.
    Last edited by brianac; December 9th, 2008 at 08:42 AM.

  13. #133

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    -- to smooth out beautiul old details -- cornices, carvings, moldings -- to allow for a new "modern" face to be put onto the building. When the "modern" junk is removed it's apparent that the damage is nearly irreparable...
    i.e. - Yankee Stadium in the 70's.

  14. #134

    Default

    As part of the renovation, they have to get rid of the old facade, strip the building to its skeleton and then build the new facade. This could possibly be the New York equivalent of the Stock Exchange Tower redevelopment in London.

    Nobody likes this renovation project.

  15. #135
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Earlier in this thread you'll see mention that they are not stripping this building to the skeleton because some of the brick is actually structural and therefore will remain.

Page 9 of 32 FirstFirst ... 567891011121319 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Woolworth Building - 233 Broadway - by Cass Gilbert
    By bak in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 214
    Last Post: April 15th, 2015, 05:23 AM
  2. 4 Times Square a.k.a. Conde Nast Building - 42nd Street & Broadway - by Fox & Fowle
    By ddny in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 416
    Last Post: January 2nd, 2014, 06:18 PM
  3. 500 Fifth Avenue - by Shreve, Lamb & Harmon
    By Rich Battista in forum New York Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: March 6th, 2011, 04:37 PM
  4. Clean Sweep at 1515 Broadway
    By BrooklynRider in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: September 17th, 2008, 05:51 PM
  5. Broadway Musicians Considering Union Strike
    By Agglomeration in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: November 12th, 2007, 09:20 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software