Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 64

Thread: Paris Development

  1. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
    Porte de la Villette (line 7) or Porte de Pantin (line 5).
    Long trip for most of the audience.

  2. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
    Vuitton Foundation for Arts
    16th arrondissement of inner Paris

    Architect : Gehry
    The construction of this building has started.



    Wow, it may be my lack of architectural "taste" but this is the most horrible design I've seen in a long time. Looks like Gehry was inspired by a garbage dump when he thought up this one. Does originality always mean revolting chaos these days? I can't believe somebody even pays for this crap that dots our cities. I like Madison Square Garden more than I like this design.


  3. #18

    Default

    I'm kinda with Jake on the wholw deconstructed/exploded style. I think about 5 buildings like that worldwide is about enough. Then again, up close, the only Gehry building I've seen was almsot lyrically sculptural (aiiighhh! I'm sounding like Ouroussof!!!)

  4. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Tour Carpe Diem (La Defense)



    Architect : ROBERT A.M. STERN ARCHITECTS for AVIVA France
    32 floors
    About 160m.

  5. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Financial Times
    A quarter born of co-operation

    By Phyllis Richardson
    Published: January 5 2008 00:39 | Last updated: January 5 2008 00:39




    If you don’t live in Paris’s 13th arrondissement, you probably don’t know about it. The streets and even Metro stops aren’t on many maps of the city. And anyone looking to get there by taxi might find that the driver’s response is “n’existe pas”.
    But on 130 hectares of land stretching 2.7km along the Seine and well within the city limits, a mammoth redevelopment project has begun to emerge. Where there was once the echoing rattle of train sheds, unfriendly factory buildings and disused industrial plants, there is now the buzz and hum of what is being called Paris’s “nouveau quartier”. It is the most ambitious urban renewal programme that the French capital has seen since the 1860s, when Baron Haussmann cleared away swathes of medieval infrastructure to create grand boulevards and imposing mansion blocks. And, in fact, many say that it is even more revolutionary.
    Starting with initial planning in the 1980s and named Paris Rive Gauche in 1996, the project includes a mixture of housing, university campuses, offices and amenities, all of which are now coming to fruition following a dizzying amount of consultation between the township, or mairie, of the 13th arrondissement, citizens’ groups, lobbies (including a powerful pro-environment group), designers, developers, financiers, engineers and dozens of new and established architects.
    At a projected cost of €3.2bn, it is being overseen by La Semapa (loosely an anagram for a name translated as “the society for mixed development and planning”), which is composed of 19 different organisations. They are led by Serge Blisko, the local mayor, who in 2001 pushed to make sure the new development would be “a real place for living” with residential, retail and public buildings as well as commercial ones. There are now 5,000 housing units planned for the roughly triangular site, which is bounded by the Seine to the north, Boulevard Massena to the east, the Avenue de France to the south and the Gare d’Austerlitz to the west. Half the homes are designated for lower-income residents and there will be 700,000 sq metres of office space and 10 hectares of parks and gardens. The Jussieu university has been partly restructured to form a new institution called Paris 7-Denis Diderot and the Val-de-Seine School of Architecture occupies a refurbished factory building.
    Today, in spite of the forests of cranes and the clatter of the jackhammers, newcomers are already moving in. Sylvain Bourmeau, editor of culture magazine Les Inrockuptibles, is one example. He relocated to one of the new architect-designed apartment buildings earlier this year with his wife, Hélène Borraz, and their two young children, in part because he thinks the new area is a welcome departure from Haussmann’s Paris. “There is not that strict uniformity,” he says, pointing from his third-floor terrace. “Look. There are different colours and shapes, not just buildings that are all calculated to be in exact proportion to the width of the street, et cetera. There is also a mix, social housing, universities and parks.”
    Rather than serving as a showcase for one man’s vision, Paris Rive Gauche exemplifies the broader French spirit, he adds. And others more intimately involved in the development agree. “When it works, that collective nature can be really wonderful,” says New Zealand-born, Paris-based architect Brendan MacFarlane of Jakob and MacFarlane, which won the competition to redevelop an old turn-of-the-century dockside depot. “Sometimes having to have so many opinions and agreement can be a nightmare but, when everyone comes together around a table and it works, it can be amazing. I don’t think this is an experience that will be repeatable.”
    His building, which features an audacious faceted external structure and landscaped roof terrace, will house cafés, shops, exhibition space for contemporary design and the French Fashion Institute, following its move from the more genteel 16th arrondissment. The aim, MacFarlane says, was to create “a gateway to the 13th”. Other new landmarks in the neighbourhood include the Piscine Josephine Baker, a floating swimming pool docked further along the river to the east, and, just past it, the Passerrelle Simone de Beauvoir, an elegant pedestrian bridge made of two curved, criss-crossing elements that link the Parc de Bercy to the popular MK2 cinema complex and the Bibliothèque Nationale de France.
    The latter, completed in 1995 and one of François Mitterand’s grands projets, was the area’s first signature building but only now is it seen as a part of the city rather than a lone star shining in isolation. Until the adjoining MK2 was built in 2003, “there was nothing here,” explains Borraz, who runs the Paris office of publishing house Thames & Hudson. “It was like no-man’s land. You didn’t want to go past the railway tracks or anywhere near really.”
    But that’s part of what made Paris Rive Gauche possible. No houses or structures of cultural significance will be knocked down to accommodate its many parts. Most of the land now being developed was railway storage owned by SNCF and, although some businesses did occupy the site, including moulins (industrial flour mills such as the Grand Moulins de Paris and the Halle aux Farins) and frigo (refrigerated warehouses), they have been re-located outside the city. Those large tracks still in use will be covered with raised, landscaped structures negotiated with pedestrian bridges.
    Estate agent François Bernheim of agency L’Adresse, who moved his office from the 16th arrondissement to the “old part” of the 13th at the beginning of 2007, has watched the changes happen first-hand. “Before it was like the frontier here,” he says. “Now it is very interesting. So many more people now using the shops and cafés it’s definitely a good thing. But we can’t keep up. Every day I have people here wanting to buy, students wanting a small studio or attic room to rent. But there isn’t much available at the moment. Personally, I like new architecture. I am happy about working with new buildings. But the new housing is mostly sold by the developers, so it will take a year or two for things to become available.”
    The good news is that prices remain reasonable when compared with the rest of Paris. “A few years ago you would have paid about €4,000 per sq metre [in the older part of the neighbourhood] and now it’s more like €6,000 but that’s still like it was in the 16th three years ago,” he says. New apartments, typically sold off plan, start at €8,000-€9,000 per sq metre.
    Buyers of the more expensive, larger flats tend to be “bobos”, Bernheim adds, the same “bourgeois bohemians” with middle-class incomes and strong cultural interests that were credited with reviving the Canal Saint Martin neighbourhood in recent years. Investors are less common because the buy-to-let market is undeveloped and “you just don’t make the return”.
    Some long-time inhabitants of the older part of the 13th are worried about the new development. “It’s good for business, yes,” says the owner of Bistro Viaduc, a resident of Rue Tolbiac for 20 years, as he pours champagne for customers. “But the prices...”
    “All the people who work around here now, they live in the suburbs,” adds one of his waitresses.
    Still, there is hope that a comfortable balance of old and new can be achieved and a new community created at least by the time the project is scheduled to finish in 2017. “None of our friends have moved here yet but a lot of them are now asking us to look around for them,” says Borraz. She gazes from her living room window over a vacant lot that will soon become a “prairie-style” garden. “We’re like the pioneers.”
    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/4e9873d6-b...0779fd2ac.html

    The first sentences are exagerated, Paris Rive Gauche is on every map that I know and Parisian taxi unlike London one don't know the whole city that's why they have all the GPS system since a long time.
    But the rest of this article is good.
    Last edited by Minato ku; January 23rd, 2008 at 11:38 AM.

  6. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Businessimmo
    PARIS: 40,000 RESIDENCES OR NOTHING !

    Paris mayor Bertrand Delanoë is basing his campaign on housing. In his project for Paris 2008-2014, the mayor, who is seeking reelection, promised 40,000 additional low-cost residences in Paris: one-third new construction, one-third renovations, and one-third from buildings that are totally or partially vacant.
    Mayor Delanoë says, “Besides low-cost housing, we are encouraging the construction of new housing in Paris.” Consistent with the local urban plan adopted in 2006 and thanks to developments currently underway (more than 70 on 1,000 hectares), the mayor is aiming for the construction of at least 4,500 new homes each year, at least 27,000 during the next term. To produce these homes, he plans to invest in land that is still available: gare de Rungis (13th arrondissement), Boucicaut (15th), gare d’Auteuil (16th), and Batignolles (17th). In addition to rezoning suburban neighborhoods, “we will intervene in the areas of Charolais (12th arrondissement), Saussure (17th), and Chapelle International (18th). We will pursue our policy of acquiring land and buildings, especially from the State, with, among others, Boulevard Ney tenement sites (18th), the Reuilly-Diderot sector (12th), and rue Saint-Didier (16th),” Delanoë details in the project.
    And in his plan for new construction, the candidate intends to require private developers to build at least 40% of private, rent-controlled homes for €16 per sq. m. This is his gesture to the middle class. Additionally, first-time buyers will receive a helping hand. Delanoë has announced a new 0% interest loan called the “Prêt Parcours Résidentiel.” This loan has better conditions compared to the current 0% “Prêt Paris Logement,” which has helped 6,000 families to buy property.
    The socialist candidate’s program for business real estate is more modest, based principally on new business incubators. “At the end of the 2008-2014 term, Paris will have 100,000 sq. m of business incubators to accommodate creators of innovative businesses,” Delanoë says. Among the projects identified are Biopark 2 in Ivry, Paris-Parc in Jussieu, a cultural incubator at 104, rue d’Aubervilliers, and an eco-business incubator in the Pujol mixed development zone. The economic attraction of Paris is addressed more in an urban logic. Bertrand Delanoë favors the creation of “Paris Metropole,” and to pull the rug out from under Nicolas Sarkozy, will meet the newly elected in March 2008. While waiting, new ring road covering projects will link neighboring communes. Between the Porte de la Chapelle and the Porte d’Aubervilliers, Paris and Plaine Commune are studying the creation of a veritable intercommunal neighborhood. Other sections being studied include the Porte de Montreuil, the Porte d’Ivry/Porte de Vanves, and the Porte des Ternes/Porte de Champerret.
    http://www.businessimmo.info/pages/l...=080116N200_en

  7. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Businessimmo
    MARKET: 2007 REMAINS A RECORD YEAR

    With more than 2.6 million m² sold in 2007 according to Keops, the office market in Ile-de-France records an activity level near that of 2006. “This figure represents a great sales level, despite a drop of 3%,” Keops announces positively.
    “In a troubled economic and financial environment, no slowdown in terms of volume marketed was observed in fourth quarter,” observes the agency. Supply continued its backward surge, the supply of offices available in less than a year having dropped 14% in one year, to reach a little more than 3.5 million m². Immediate supply neared 2.21 million m², resulting in a 4.6% vacancy rate. The increasing rarity of supply is causing concern in the traditional business districts, like Paris Centre Ouest where supply decreased by 42% and the vacancy rate fell to 2.7%. As for rent, Keops points out an average progression of 8% and notes that prime rent in the central business district of Paris went from €730/m² to €820/m² in one year.
    For the year to come, Keops waxes reassuring. “Despite economic uncertainty, the demand expressed at Keops only diminished by 4% between first and
    second semester 2007. If this rate is applied to annual demand met, this would only represent 100,000 m²,” reveals Laurent Castellani. The chairman of the board of directors of Keops projects fulfilled demand at between 2.3 and 2.4 million m² in 2008. "In the face of the probable prospect of sluggish growth, 2008 could be the year of geographic contrasts,” insists Laurent Castellani. In the traditional business sectors, currently facing short supply, the changes in rent could continue at a slower pace (around 5%). For certain peripheral sectors which have too much supply, and especially are under-sought, the current trend could be inversed.”
    Regarding investments, Keops announces a new record for the fourth consecutive year, with €29.7B invested in commercial property, a rise of 13.8% compared to 2006. 2007 was marked by the pursuit of very large transactions (more than €150M), comparable in number to those in 2006 but that went up in value. However, the number of total transactions between €50M and €150M is markedly increasing in number and in value. The first consequences of the credit crunch have not made themselves known. “Despite financial troubles, investments remained dynamic during
    fourth quarter 2007: they represented €7B and recorded a 19% growth compared to fourth quarter 2006,” observed Laurent Castellani. It is true that the primary transactions finalized in second semester were initiated before the summer crisis.
    http://www.businessimmo.info/pages/l...=080109N199_en

    In reality 2,713,100 m² (29,203,600 sq ft) of office was sell in 2007.
    Paris is the largest European market.

  8. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Other renders of Tour Carpe Diem (166m, 545 ft)












    copyright Robert A.M. Stern Architects
    http://www.e-architect.co.uk/paris/tour_carpe_diem.htm

  9. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Telegraph
    World's greenest office block set for Paris

    By Katherine Griffiths
    Last Updated: 1:05am GMT 04/01/2008

    The architect behind New York's Freedom Tower - built on the former site of the World Trade Centre - has announced that it is to construct what promises to be the world's greenest office building.
    The office block, which will be branded Energy Plus, is to be built in the run-down area of Gennevilliers in the outskirts of Paris.


    The building will have solar panels covering the roof – enough to supply its 5,000 occupants with electricity

    The project's creator, architect Skidmore Owings & Merrill, says it is also in talks to construct similar buildings in the US, Europe and the Middle East.
    America's Rocky Mountain Institute, the prestigious environmental think-tank, is advising on Energy Plus, and the project was endorsed by former US president Bill Clinton at the Clinton Global Initiative meeting last year.
    Patrick Getreide, who is leading the Energy Plus project with partner Marc Eisenberg, said: "It will be the first building in the world to be 'energy plus' and carbon zero."
    The proposed building, which will be more than 70,000 sq m and house up to 5,000 people, will produce enough of its own electricity to power all the heating, lighting, and air conditioning required by tenants. It will also generate carbon credits which it hopes to trade for money in the future.
    ...
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/mai...cngreen103.xml

    A ugly and outdated design for a great building (it is obviously a groundscraper, why we don't like height in France.)

    I reather prefer the average build or u/c 7 floors glassy office building wich are so common in Paris.


  10. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Quartier Latin with the Tour Jussieu in reconstruction

    Picture by Sinha

  11. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default

    A nice office building in Issy les Moulineaux, it is small but original compared at most boxy office buildings built ou u/c in Paris


    Bouygues real estate HQ Christian de Pontzamparc
    7,000 m² (75,347 sq ft)





    http://www.bouygues.com/fr/actualite...liale.asp?id=6

  12. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default Some building u/c in inner Paris

    Of course it would be too hard to know everyone.

    Housing and hopital building
    15th arrondissement


    Housing building
    18th arrondissement


    4 housing buildings
    18th arrondissement.


    Renaissance Wagram hotel, Christan de Portzamparc.
    17th arrondissement


    Housing building
    11th arrondissement

  13. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Social housing building
    Marais 4th arrondissement.


    Student housing building
    11th arrondissement


    Research institute on vision
    12th arrondissement



    Training and maintenance Pole
    19th arrondissement


  14. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default

    Office building Manuelle Gontrand
    16th arrondissement

    Sports and associations building
    18th arrondissement

    Perinatal and paediatrics pole of Cochin Hospital
    14th arrondissement

    Housing building Bastille
    12th arrondissemnt


    Nursery
    20th arrondissement


    These are small project but this is an idea of modern Parisian building since high-rises represent a very small part of Parisan projects.

  15. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    463

    Default Redevelopment of Montreuil center, some projects



    Recladding and renovation of Franklin tower
    94 m or 308 ft





    Renovation and recllading of Atais tower in the same district


    These towers actually


    The district.


Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Brooklyn waterfront development
    By NYguy in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 119
    Last Post: January 11th, 2016, 02:44 PM
  2. Greenways and Waterfront Development
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 198
    Last Post: July 21st, 2015, 01:30 AM
  3. Astoria Development
    By Kris in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 64
    Last Post: November 26th, 2014, 04:43 AM
  4. The Final Frontier for Development in Manhattan - Falling re
    By Fabb in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: June 18th, 2003, 05:16 PM
  5. E 34th new development
    By tlowe in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 31st, 2003, 05:15 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software