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Thread: World Trade Centre

  1. #31

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    Battery Park City is a 92 acre (0.4 km²) planned community at the southwestern tip of lower Manhattan in New York City, United States. The land upon which it stands was created from the Hudson River using 1.2 million cubic yards (917,000 m³) of dirt and rocks excavated during the construction of the World Trade Center and certain other construction projects, as well as from sand dredged from New York Harbor off Staten Island.[1] The neighborhood, which is the site of the World Financial Center along with numerous housing, commercial and retail buildings, is named for adjacent Battery Park.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battery...ity,_Manhattan

  2. #32
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    The point is, BPC was not there until they began construction of the World Trade Center - to answer his question.

  3. #33

  4. #34

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    Original 1 and 2 WTC (ca. 1977 -- U.S. Steel and Bankers Trust Buildings completed; adjacent
    segment of West Side Highway still standing; and no structures visible atop BPC landfill)

    Last edited by ManhattanKnight; May 20th, 2008 at 04:02 PM.

  5. #35

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    Because I never had the chance to see or visit the WTC, I like this video, because it is one of the few I have seen that gives you a look at the area between the towers and a brief look at the other WTC buildings.
    Plus, it shows the magnificent views I was never able to see.

    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=-Do645...eature=related

  6. #36

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    What a wonderful video Brian.

    Thanks for posting.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post






    photographer unknown

  8. #38

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    The one with the tombstones is especially poignant. The sea of slabs reminds me of the Manhattan skyline; every tomb represents a life just like every building represents a concept, an idea.

    RIP

  9. #39

  10. #40

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    They were simply iconic buildings, and there falling changed the World as we know it.

  11. #41
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Nice shot Irish.

    Smells, sometimes Iconic is what you strive for.

  12. #42
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    New Glimpses of the Twin Towers’ Past

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP


    Courtesy of Anthony W. Robins
    The cover of a guide to the observation deck.





    Courtesy of Anthony W. Robins
    Floor plan of the mall from "The Top Is Just the Tip" brochure.





    Courtesy of Anthony W. Robins
    Detail from a page in an early 1970s brochure, "WTC Is Now!"




    Courtesy of Anthony W. Robins
    Detail of a rendering of the mall, from "WTC Is Now!"





    Courtesy of Anthony W. Robins
    This brochure covered the center's architecture and engineering.





    Courtesy of Anthony W. Robins
    A 1964 brochure gave a sense of the buildings' colossal scale.




    Anthony W. Robins did not set out to amass one of the most important surviving archives of the original World Trade Center. Though he is an architectural historian devoted to the buildings of New York City, Mr. Robins didn’t even set out to study the twin towers.


    Courtesy of Anthony W. Robins
    From “The World Trade Center: A Building Project Like No Other”

    Rather, Gale Research, which was planning a series of books in the 1980s under the rubric “Classics of American Architecture,” asked Mr. Robins if he would turn his attention first to the trade center before tackling a monograph on the Chrysler Building, which was his preference.

    Mr. Robins, now 62, is a well-known figure in landmarks circles, having served on the staff of the Landmarks Preservation Commission for 19 years. He is an adjunct professor at Columbia University and New York University. And if you happen to see a walking tour coming your way under the confident leadership of a man in a Bailey Dalton safari hat — well, that’s Mr. Robins.

    Following his publisher’s request for a book on the trade center, Mr. Robins began his research in the early ’80s with the cooperation of the library maintained by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey on the 55th floor of 1 World Trade Center, the north tower. The librarians permitted him to copy much of the material he needed, to supplement brochures and pamphlets he had obtained. His book was published in 1987.

    Of course, “Classics of American Architecture: The World Trade Center” turned out to be the first of several shelves full of books about the trade center. This year, Mr. Robins published what amounts to a 25th-anniversary edition. (Sample pages as a PDF.) Apart from corrections, he has wisely left the original text untouched, the better to capture the memory of the trade center as it once was, he said in the foreword.

    The new edition, Mr. Robins wrote, is intended to be a “reminder of a more innocent time, when the center stood as a symbol, certainly, of hubris, wealth and power, but also of the conviction that in New York City, Americans could do anything to which they set their minds.”

    That end is well served by his decision to include reproductions of 10 original documents about the trade center: Port Authority reports, brochures, pamphlets and booklets. Given what happened on Sept. 11, 2001, the exuberant language is almost shocking in its poignancy. A brochure for the observation deck, for example, begins with the headline: “The closest some of us will ever get to heaven.”

    That so much trade center ephemera survived can be credited to Mr. Robins’s files, since the Port Authority’s collection was largely obliterated on 9/11. The library that Mr. Robins used was closed in 1995. In following years, some items in the World Trade Center archive had been given to other institutions. But the bulk of the material was in a storage cage on basement level B-4 when the towers fell.

    What brings these artifacts to mind now is the marketing campaign by 1 World Trade Center, which is trying to entice tenants with catchphrases like: “New York’s number one,” “The world’s greatest address,” and “The summit of global real estate.”

    The upbeat language of marketing has returned to ground zero. The funerary hush is slipping away. The Durst Organization, co-developer of 1 World Trade Center, notes on its Web site that the tower is “part of a 16-acre campus featuring a tree-filled park” (otherwise known as the National September 11 Memorial) and “nearly 450,000 square feet of dining, entertainment and shopping options.”

    Mr. Robins’s collection evokes this same spirit and adds a rich dimension to trade center history. It also added 105 pages to what was originally a 65-page book. And he has a great deal more, about 500 pages.

    “What I discovered in this process is that original documents are fascinating and need to be available, but in libraries and archives, not in books,” he wrote on the blog of the Special Libraries Association. “So what I hope to do — sometime in the coming year — is scan as much as I can and gradually put it up on a Web site.”

    These documents are bound to interest not only historians but also New Yorkers seeking to recall the trade center’s early decades. I, for one, may never look again at the annual tribute in light without recalling that the observation deck once advertised itself with this admonition:

    “And in the evening, please don’t touch the stars.”


    Courtesy of Anthony W. Robins

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...n-towers-past/

  13. #43
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    They were both awesome and ugly buildings at the same time.


    I think they looked best at night, where their rectilinear form was controlled by the people still working on seemingly random floors all up and down the building.

  14. #44
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    And they did this.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Merry; December 26th, 2012 at 03:44 AM. Reason: Fix broken link

  15. #45
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Review> Prime Real Estate

    Susan Morris reviews the new movie, 16 Acres, about rebuilding the World Trade Center site.

    by Susan Morris


    Courtesy 16 Acres The Movie

    www.16acresthemovie.com

    On September 11, 2012, no politicians spoke at Ground Zero. That absence contrasted with 2011’s tenth “Tin” Anniversary event, when Michael Arad’s Memorial Plaza opened, with speeches by Presidents Obama and Bush, governors Christie and Cuomo, former mayor Giuliani, and former governors Pataki and DiFrancesco. What came next, however, was considerably less uplifting: the freezing of funds for the 9/11 Memorial Museum, marking the continued dysfunctional normal for the World Trade Center site, which has been rebuilding since the attack in 2001.

    Now, after seeing the intelligent documentary 16 Acres, which opens with Bob Dylan’s “Everything is Broken,” we come to understand what is behind the saga of building at Ground Zero.

    The film was shown at the Architecture & Design Film Festival, in New York in October. Our main guides through this feckless roundelay are two journalists, Philip Noble, author of Sixteen Acres: Architecture and the Outrageous Struggle for the Future of Ground Zero (2004), and Scott Raab, who has written about the site for Esquire since 2005. With a wicked sense of humor and resigned irony, these keen observers analyze and synthesize the actions, decisions, and motivations of a parade of characters. Interviewees include George Pataki, Larry Silverstein, Danny Libeskind, Roland Betts (Lower Manhattan Development Corporation-LMDC), Janno Lieber (WTC Properties), Kenneth Ringler (Port Authority), David Childs (SOM), Michael Bloomberg, Rosaleen Tallon (family member), Chris Ward (Port Authority), and Michael Arad.



    It’s an impressive collection, but obvious omissions include Paul Goldberger, who wrote his own book, Up From Zero: Politics, Architecture, and the Rebuilding of New York, (2005) about the same subject; John C. Whitehead, chairman of the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation and chairman of LMDC; and former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer.

    Telling this story in film brings these personalities and their motivations to vivid life and shows their true colors (Pataki as a political opportunist and obstructionist, Silverstein as a sometimes tone-deaf-but-earnest businessman). Then there are the made-for-the-camera, fig-leaf media events like the laying of a cornerstone on July 4, 2004 (an irrelevant act, as cornerstones are not used in modern skyscrapers). That event had been prompted by Pataki’s re-election campaign and the Republican National Convention.

    Subsequently, the cornerstone’s siting drew objections from the New York Police Department as too vulnerable, and was moved. As a result, the Freedom Tower scheme had to be scrapped and redesigned. (The irrelevant cornerstone was finally removed and now sits behind the engravers’ headquarters on Long Island. Raab, meanwhile, fantasizes a scene of dumping the rock on Pataki’s front lawn, ringing the doorbell, and racing away as fast as possible.)

    Along with fantasy, the film lets us steep ourselves in the site itself, via reminders of the fits and starts of building at Ground Zero, the alphabet soup of stakeholders, the complicated rebuilding efforts. In contrast, 7 World Trade, also designed by David Childs and sited directly across the street, involved only Larry Silverstein and the Port Authority and was completed in 2006.

    After the destruction of the twin towers, an immense architecture and planning opportunity arose for the city on what Raab called “perhaps the most valuable 16 acres on the face of the earth…at the center of the cosmos and fair game.” But the ensuing saga can now be viewed only as a series of scrambled opportunities and mixed messages.

    These skeins are effectively sorted out in this smart film. Nobel highlights that these yet-to-be-built office buildings were being asked to embody the nation’s collective response—defiant renewal, a symbol of vengeance, and a symbol of healing. But as Paul Goldberger said in his book, “The greatest conflict was not between those who wanted to build and those who wanted the site to remain empty but between those who saw the priority of new construction on the site as primarily commercial and those who saw it as primarily symbolic and cultural.” Rather than void the pre-existing agreement with the leaseholder and rethink the use of the 16 acres, the arrangement remained, thus dictating that the rebuilding utilize the equivalent space for the same designated purposes.

    A prime example of the zig-zag trajectory is the competition for the master plan (largely interpreted as the design of buildings themselves), which turned out to be a charade. First, the LMDC, created by Pataki and Giuliani to oversee the rebuilding, chose a design by THINK (Shigeru Ban, Frederic Schwartz, Ken Smith, Rafael Vinoly). Pataki, however, disregarded the agency’s choice and instead selected Libeskind’s proposal.

    Yet neither THINK nor Libeskind had the chance to realize their schemes, since leaseholder Larry Silverstein, who was paying for the rebuilding (as well as $10 million per month in rent to the Port Authority whether any buildings existed or not), wanted his own architect, David Childs. A shotgun marriage between Liebeskind and Childs didn’t work. Nobel tells the story of how SOM staff removed the large illuminated model of the Freedom Tower while it was being displayed at yet another Pataki press conference, this one at Federal Hall.

    The last Libeskind remnant—a “stick on top,” reaching to the symbolic 1776 feet—was even lopped off as the model exited the hall, never to be seen again.

    Michael Arad, who had to make his own compromises on the memorial, said, “It’s easy to think about all of the strife, all the disagreement, to focus on this didn’t go right, that didn’t go right…Actually, in the big picture, something did go right, really right.”

    At present, four towers are in various stages of completion on the 16-acre site: 1 World Trade (no longer called the Freedom Tower), by David Childs; 2 World Trade, by Norman Foster; 3, by Richard Rogers; and 4, by Fumihiko Maki. As Philip Nobel said, “It’s an incredibly healthy thing that the city responded to September 11 in classic New York fashion by beating each other up, and grandstanding, and political manipulation. And you can say, ‘Oh, that’s awful,’ or you can say, ‘What a wonderful thing that New York healed this big wound with more New York.’” Let’s hope that it’s worth the wait.

    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=6418

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