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Thread: 330 Hudson St. + 14-story addition (mixed use office/hotel)

  1. #31
    The Dude Abides
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    The addition looks very contextual.

  2. #32

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    One building on top of another.

    That's contextual?

  3. #33
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    Well, contextual as far as additions go, I suppose.

    Think of it this way: how often do we see a new building go up nowadays that basically looks like a slimmer tower plopped onto a fat base?

  4. #34
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    lofter, you're right. They are the same proposal. I remember that one now.

    I'll send a message to a moderator to have them merged.

    By the way, I think the addition is not that great. By trying to be as contextual as possible, it actually ends up looking worse. If they had done a sleeky all-glass top ala Enrique Norton's One York instead, it would have been spectacular.

    Isn't funny in this city, when glass is called for, they do something else but when glass is inappropriate, that's when they give you nothing but glass.
    Last edited by antinimby; January 30th, 2008 at 07:28 AM.

  5. #35
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Merged threads.

  6. #36

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    Viceroy Hotel Headed to Hudson Street

    by Chris Shott
    Yesterday, 10:54 am

    Hotel Chatter

    Hotel Chatter is reporting that Kors Hotel Group will open its first Manhattan lodge on Hudson Street, under the Viceroy Hotel moniker, possibly as soon as 2010:
    Viceroy's first New York City project will offer 168 exquisitely appointed accommodations set within the top 12 newly constructed floors of an office, retail and hotel complex being developed on a full city block at 330 Hudson Street between Charlton and Vandam Streets in New York's Hudson Square neighborhood.

    The architects come from Brennan Beer Gorman, which also designed the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, W Union Square, and Gramercy Park Hotel.

    © 2008 Observer Media Group,

  7. #37
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Looks like the design has been changed for the worse. I much preferred the original roof design. I don't like how it is now so asymmetrical.

  8. #38
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Exclamation Mods: Thread Title Alert

    Could the Title of this thread be adjusted to add the name of the project?

    It's being developed by the Kor Hotel Group and will be called the:

    Viceroy Hotel

  9. #39
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    330 Hudson Getting Gutted for Guests to Come

    CURBED
    9.16.2008


    330 Hudson, now gutted with columns running into infinity.

    There is a corner of Manhattan, variously called Hudson Square or West SoHo,
    that might better be described as Hotel Central given the recent inroads just
    north of Canal Street. Those at the head of the onslaught include Trump
    (and friends), Sheraton and Hampton Inn. The development of the new
    Viceroy Hotel by the Kor Hotel Group at 330 Hudson is an entirely different
    situation. Here they're taking a 100-year old building that covers the west end
    of the block between Charlton and Vandam and working the wonders of adaptive
    re-use. Over the past few months they've cleared out the guts of the brick
    and limestone structure. Plus, in the middle of the building, they've dug down
    a story or two. Now the gang from Brennan Beer Gorman Architects is getting
    ready to load in some steel and commence with a vertical enlargement, eventually
    adding 12 new floors to create a brand-new mixed-use facility. What can be
    seen now might be the best part: the bones of a solid piece of New York's
    manufacturing stock, a collection of foot-square timbers, thick brick walls,
    limestone detailing and Guastavino tiles. This stuff lasts.


    The Viceroy Hotel plan (insert) and 330 Hudson, currently under renovation.


    A new shaftway has been cut through concrete slabs.


    Digging down in the central air well to make way for the hotel foundation.


    The old interior now opened up.


    The corner of Hudson and Vandam.


    The inside of 330 Hudson, gutted and ready for a dose of adaptive re-use.


    Guastavino tiles line the ceiling of a Hudson Street staircase.


    A neighbor on Vandam Street, being demo-ed for a new project by Extell.

    · Meanwhile, Back in Soho, the Trump Soho at Street Level [Curbed]
    · Experience > Viceroy New York [Kor Hotel Group website]
    · 330 Hudson St. - mixed use office/hotel [Wired New York]

    330 hudson

  10. #40
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Mixed Use

    By Patrick Hedlund

    Hudson hotel no-go

    The investment firm that partnered with Trinity Real Estate to redevelop a former manufacturing building in Hudson Square reportedly lost more than $50 million when the landlord severed ties with the developer last year.

    Tribeca Associates, which arranged a deal with property owner Trinity in 2007 to convert 330 Hudson St. into a 22-story luxury hotel with office and retail space, was dismissed by the landlord late last year for reportedly not fulfilling its obligations under the agreement.

    According to reports, Trinity had moved to foreclose on the project earlier in 2009 based on claims that Tribeca Associates had slowed its progress due to the recession. This, following the $35 million Tribeca Associates had already invested in demolition, environmental abatement, building stabilization, foundation pouring and steel work, according to Real Estate Weekly. Under the 99-year lease, the developer also paid roughly $15 million up front for three years’ worth of rent.

    Erin Roeder, Trinity’s director of strategic neighborhood development, could not comment directly on the project, stating only that plans have returned to the drawing board. “The property is back in our possession, and we’ll be exploring options from here on out,” she said.

    Real Estate Weekly suggested that Tribeca Associates might have earned the landlord’s ire when it attempted to lure a commercial tenant away from a Trinity property to take space at 330 Hudson. After Trinity refused to let the tenant, Penguin Books, terminate its lease to move into the renovated building, the landlord renewed the tenant’s lease at another of its nearby properties.

    Rents still dropping

    Rental prices for most Downtown apartments continued to drop in the year’s first month, hinting that the market hasn’t yet fully bottomed out.

    According to a January rental market report from the Real Estate Group New York, the Soho experienced a decrease of 3.82 percent in the average rental price for doorman and non-doorman studios through two-bedrooms since the previous month.

    The Lower East Side weathered a 4.18 percent overall reduction, with only one unit type — non-doorman two-bedrooms — showing gains month over month.

    But the Financial District saw a modest, 2.18 percent gain overall, with doorman units rising across the board by an average of 6.28 percent.

    Tribeca, which along with Soho touts the city’s highest average rental prices, experienced a 1.63 overall drop, with all one- and two-bedroom apartment types suffering reductions.

    Battery Park City, where only doorman units were recorded in the report, saw an increase of less than 1 percent overall, including a 3.77 jump in the average price of two-bedrooms.

    Manhattan-wide, the largest drops occurred in these same Downtown neighborhoods, with Tribeca doorman two-bedrooms falling by an average of 6.4 percent, Financial District non-doorman studios dropping by 6.12 percent, Village doorman two-bedrooms decreasing by 7.29 percent, L.E.S. non-doorman studios slipping by 8.34 percent and Soho non-doorman two-bedrooms falling by 6.12 percent.

    Meanwhile, rents in the Financial District fell last year by nearly 10 percent on average for all residential apartment types while the neighborhood’s vacancy rate more than doubled, according to a report by Platinum Properties.

    Single professionals benefited most from the downturn, with rents for studios that include a home office decreasing by 11.1 percent — dropping from an average of $2,981 per month in 2008 to $2,649 last year — the most of all the unit types surveyed.

    Rents for traditional studios slipped by 9.88 percent last year—from $2,453 per month in 2008 to $2,211 — while one-bedrooms decreased by 8.3 percent (from $3,059 in 2008 to $2,901 last year).
    Two-bedrooms saw the smallest reduction, 7.82 percent, as average rents fell from $4,280 in 2008 to $4,074 last year.

    The Financial District had been steadily growing the two years prior to 2009, with average overall gains of 4.89 percent in 2008 and 9.41 in 2007.

    The neighborhood’s vacancy rate rose from 2.28 percent in 2008 (of 6,686 total units counted) to 4.98 last year (7,649 units).

    Fire sale

    Village preservationists are hoping that the well-known buyer of a historic South Village firehouse will maintain as much of the century-old property’s original character as possible.

    The building, formerly operated by the New York Fire Patrol, at 84 W. Third St., was reportedly snatched up by CNN uber-anchor Anderson Cooper for $4.3 million last September.

    The four-story, Beaux Arts property — complete with indoor fire poles, spiral staircases and murals chronicling the Fire Patrol’s history — represents one of only three remaining firehouses for the now-defunct organization.

    West Village/Chelsea architect Cary Tamarkin is handling the build-out, according to city records, and work has already begun at the site, with permits issued for “demolition of interior partitions and plumbing fixtures.”

    The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation recently got the New York State Historic Preservation Office to consider the property for inclusion in the State and National Registers of Historic Places, which would afford the owner tax breaks and incentives for preserving as much of the building as possible.

    http://downtownexpress.com/de_354/mixeduse.html

  11. #41

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    Hopefully, these schmucks will leave that beautiful building alone. There's plenty of crappy garages in that area that can be razed, and there are many parking lots.

  12. #42

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    Originally Published: February 09, 2010 3:13 PM
    Modified: February 09, 2010 6:11 PM

    330 Hudson St. taken back by Trinity

    Move follows months of battles with developer whose plan to convert the building to office/hotel use had foundered; demise of a lynch pin.

    By Theresa Agovino

    Trinity Real Estate has taken back the lease on 330 Hudson St. from Tribeca Associates, ending a nasty legal battle that started last March over stalled plans to convert the building into a mixed-used property that was to include a hotel.

    Three years ago, Trinity granted Tribeca and its partners a 99-year lease to redevelop the old warehouse building in a deal that was hailed at the time as a lynch pin to transforming the Hudson Square area into a more vibrant neighborhood. But by last year, activity on the site had stalled and the two sides were hurling accusations at each other in court papers.

    Trinity said that Tribeca was in breach of its contract because it was failing to pay contractors and threatened to foreclose.

    But Tribeca, which had already sunk at least $63 million into the project in addition to paying $15 million in rent, said that Trinity was sabotaging its efforts by interfering with its ability to sign a tenant for the office space and by doggedly insisting that a hotel be included in the project. It said that hospitality market wouldn't stabilize as quickly as the office market.

    Tribeca and its partners, Latus Partners and Square Mile Capital Management, believed the recession and credit crisis triggered a provision in their lease allowing them to delay construction. But Trinity countered that the economy wasn't a reason to change the deal, which called for construction by be completed by this summer.

    Details of the deal that ended the dispute were not disclosed, but last month, a formal termination of the lease was filed in court.

    In a statement, Trinity Real Estate President Carl Weisbrod said the roofless building was left open to the elements, creating a serious threat to the structure, a potential safety hazard for the neighborhood and an unsightly street condition. He added that Trinity had no other choice but to repossess the building and that work is underway to protect the structure.

    Sources said that Trinity is looking for another company to lease and then redevelop the building. Tribeca partner Bill Brodsky declined to comment.

    http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...FREE/100209875

  13. #43
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    No hotel here, but they'll incorporate the great old building into the new ...

    New building slated for Hudson Square

    Beacon Capital Partners signs 99-year lease to erect a 350,000-square-foot building with office and retail space at 330 Hudson St. It's the second big deal in two months for Beacon.

    CRAIN'S
    June 9, 2011

    Trinity Real Estate signed a 99-year lease with an affiliate of Beacon Capital Partners to build an office building at the stalled development site at 330 Hudson St.

    It is Beacon's second investment in New York City in two months. In May, it signed a contact to buy between 70% and 80% of landmarked 195 Broadway from L&L Holding and its capital partner, GE Pension Trust, sources familiar with the transaction said.
    Financial terms of Beacon's deal with Trinity were not disclosed. The Boston-based real estate investment firm is planning an approximate 350,000-square-foot office building, including about 20,000 square feet of retail space at its base. Plans call for incorporating the site's existing eight-story former warehouse into the new building, according to a Thursday statement by Trinity.

    The proposed building is “as-of-right” and requires no zoning changes.

    “We are delighted to welcome a company with the strength, experience and track record of Beacon Capital Partners to Hudson Square,” said Jason Pizer, president of Trinity Real Estate, in a statement. “They are committed to moving forward expeditiously on this key property, and we are confident the development will add immeasurably to the quality, vitality and excitement of this dynamic community.”

    Several years ago Trinity leased the building to Tribeca Associates, which had planned to build a hotel on the site. However, Trinity took the site back last year after a nasty legal battle.

    “With several new hotels in the area, the current proposed office/retail mix is clearly the most attractive and compelling development option,” Mr. Pizer said. He also pointed out that recent leasing activity throughout the portfolio offers another strong indication of Hudson Square's promising future.

    Meanwhile, Trinity had been negotiating for Pearson, the British media giant, to move into 330 Hudson St., sources said. It is unclear if those negotiations are still continuing.

    Pearson would be a good fit for Trinity, which has turned its holdings in Hudson Square, just north of the Holland Tunnel entrance, into a mecca for media and creative firms. Pearson, whose holdings include Penguin Books and Financial Times, has offices in at least two buildings in New York: 1330 Sixth Ave. and 375 Hudson St.

    Beacon, whose local holdings include 1211 Sixth Ave., was established in January 1998 and has sponsored seven investment vehicles with $11 billion in capital since its inception. Sources have said it is considering selling 1211 Sixth Ave.

    ©2011 Crain Communications Inc.

  14. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post


    A neighbor on Vandam Street, being demo-ed for a new project by Extell.
    Here's the Lucien Lagrange designed hotel that Extell was trying to construct at 68 Charlton Street.
    Now they're selling the site.


    Eastern Consolidated
    http://www.easternconsolidated.com/l...listing_id=786

  15. #45
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    That's actually very nice. Of course now the site goes on sale.

    Who wants to bet the next design won't be so nice? We just don't have any luck in this city.
    Last edited by antinimby; August 29th, 2011 at 11:15 PM.

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