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Thread: The City University of New York (CUNY)

  1. #1

    Default The City University of New York (CUNY)

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    Last edited by ironmike9110; March 16th, 2008 at 09:40 PM.

  2. #2
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Baruch, a very good business school.

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    The ones that are community colleges usually have it in their name (Kingsborough CC, Borough of Manhattan CC etc). There are 7 (main) senior CUNY campuses. Each is different, with their own quirks and advantages and drawbacks.

    Baruch College
    Brooklyn College
    College of Staten Island
    City College of New York (I go here, I can tell you it's quite up to snuff...)
    Hunter College
    Lehman College
    Queens College

    Link

    There are also various divisions sprinkled in a few locations. The law school and the biomed school (Sophie Davis, on CCNY's campus) for example.

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    I went to Baruch. An excellent business school.

    Brooklyn College has a lovely campus.

    Hunter has a great reputation.

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    Last edited by ironmike9110; March 16th, 2008 at 09:41 PM.

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    ironmike9110: I think you should look not at the net cost of studying at the school, but at how much you will actually pay for your education and how much money you'll be able to make after you graduate.

    1) If you study really well, you can get a very good financial aid/scholarship package at a private school (especially those that are less prestigious like Pace U.).

    2) If you can get into a good school like NYU or Columbia, your earning potential will be much greater for many years after the graduation which can make those loans worthwhile.

    3) If your family is poor, you can be eligible for state and federal grants that can help soften the blow and most private schools provide need-based scholaships that can be significant.

    4) You can get a good education at a public/city school. But in my personal and somewhat biased opinion, it's more difficult because classes are large, there's a lot of beauracracy, there's less help and personal attention from the faculty members. And because virtually anybody can get in, there are lots of students in the class that don't really want to study. Yet I know several people that got good education from Brooklyn College, Baruch and Hunter.

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    Sorry, apparently we need to follow MrSpice around with a "Truth Squad."

    Bush: Budget will spur growth, rein in spending
    CNN.com Wednesday, February 8, 2006

    MANCHESTER, New Hampshire (CNN) -- President Bush on Wednesday talked up his budget on a trip to New Hampshire, hours before signing a bill he says is a major step toward cutting the nation's deficit in half by 2009.

    [snip]

    After returning to the White House from New Hampshire, the president signed the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, which makes $39 billion in cuts to student loan subsidies, Medicare, Medicaid, farm subsidies and other programs.

    "Spending restraints means making difficult choices, yet making those choices is what the American people sent us to Washington to do," the president said before signing the legislation.

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    Default Truth Patrol Counters Mrspice Lies And Misinformation

    Quote Originally Posted by MrSpice
    ...I think you should look not at the net cost of studying at the school...

    1) If you study really well, you can get a very good financial aid...

    2) ... make those loans worthwhile.

    3) ...you can be eligible for state and federal grants that can help soften the blow and most private schools provide need-based scholaships that can be significant....
    Bush forced to answer for large student loan cut in Republican budget

    Student loan budget cut is a symptom of reckless Republican support for special interest tax cuts at expense of parents and students struggling to pay for college

    WASHINGTON, DC - Members of the House Democrat's 30-Something's working group were troubled by the President's dismissal of the $12.7 billion student loan cut in the Republican budget at a Kansas State University Q&A earlier today.

    "This year's Republican budget cut $12.7 billion in funding for student loan programs over the next five years and if President Bush doesn't understand that, then either he doesn't understand the true impact this will have on American families or he doesn't care," said Representative Debbie Wasserman-Schultz (D-FL). "With tuition sky rocketing out of reach for American students and families, Congress should be increasing student loan programs, not cutting them."

    This year's Republican budget cuts $12.7 billion from student loan programs over five years. The cuts eliminate all government spending to administer the loan programs, charge students higher loan fees, and raise the interest rate on parent loans from 7.9 to 8.5 percent. The Bush Administration is the first to cut Department of Education funding since 1988.

    "The President's remarks show how disgracefully out-of-touch he is to the concerns of average Americans. Either President Bush doesn't know the Republican budget cuts student loans by a record amount, or he knows it and chooses to deny it. Regardless, students across America are depending on the President and the Republican Congress to stand up to the special interests and work with Democrats to restore this vital funding to the student aid program," said Representative Tim Ryan (D-OH).

    The President claimed that the number of students receiving Pell Grants is growing, but did not address the fact that, for the fourth year in a row, the Republican-led Congress has failed to raise the maximum value of the Pell Grant scholarship - now set at $4,050 - even though it is worth $900 less in inflation-adjusted terms than it was in 1975-76.

    The 30-Something working group is a collection of 13 Democratic Members of the House of Representatives who are under the age of 40. The group is committed to young Americans' concerns with today's government and political process.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrooklynRider
    Bush forced to answer for large student loan cut in Republican budget

    Student loan budget cut is a symptom of reckless Republican support for special interest tax cuts at expense of parents and students struggling to pay for college

    WASHINGTON, DC - Members of the House Democrat's 30-Something's working group were troubled by the President's dismissal of the $12.7 billion student loan cut in the Republican budget at a Kansas State University Q&A earlier today.

    "This year's Republican budget cut $12.7 billion in funding for student loan programs over the next five years and if President Bush doesn't understand that, then either he doesn't understand the true impact this will have on American families or he doesn't care," said Representative Debbie Wasserman-Schultz (D-FL). "With tuition sky rocketing out of reach for American students and families, Congress should be increasing student loan programs, not cutting them."

    This year's Republican budget cuts $12.7 billion from student loan programs over five years. The cuts eliminate all government spending to administer the loan programs, charge students higher loan fees, and raise the interest rate on parent loans from 7.9 to 8.5 percent. The Bush Administration is the first to cut Department of Education funding since 1988.

    "The President's remarks show how disgracefully out-of-touch he is to the concerns of average Americans. Either President Bush doesn't know the Republican budget cuts student loans by a record amount, or he knows it and chooses to deny it. Regardless, students across America are depending on the President and the Republican Congress to stand up to the special interests and work with Democrats to restore this vital funding to the student aid program," said Representative Tim Ryan (D-OH).

    The President claimed that the number of students receiving Pell Grants is growing, but did not address the fact that, for the fourth year in a row, the Republican-led Congress has failed to raise the maximum value of the Pell Grant scholarship - now set at $4,050 - even though it is worth $900 less in inflation-adjusted terms than it was in 1975-76.

    The 30-Something working group is a collection of 13 Democratic Members of the House of Representatives who are under the age of 40. The group is committed to young Americans' concerns with today's government and political process.
    I know and I completely disagree with that plicy decision. I think Pell grant is a great program - one of few government programs that work and help poor people get quality education. I did not say I agree with Bush or republicans on this and I don't think this has anything to do with the question this person is asking. We don't even know if he is eligible for Pell grant.

  10. #10

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    after researching a little more,i think i would rather get a cheap apartment instead of the student housing link i put in the first post of this thread, this way i am more free and able to take all my current assets (couch, tv, bed, etc.) of my own with me. I want to live in the Bronx, but how long would it take to get to Midtown Manhattan (Baruch College) from lets say Fordham? Would i be better off in Brooklyn, what neighborhoods (Brooklyn or Bronx) would you guys recomend for a college student? I want to meet new people and have fun, not be in a quiet neighborhood, i want a city feel...

  11. #11

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    You are a prime candidate for my neighborhood: Port Morris, in the Bronx. It takes about 15 minutes to get to midtown, on the east side.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schadenfrau
    You are a prime candidate for my neighborhood: Port Morris, in the Bronx. It takes about 15 minutes to get to midtown, on the east side.
    Thats good...15 minutes, thats shorter than what its gonna take me next year --- Good neighborhood?

  13. #13

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    I love the neighborhood, but "good" is really dependent upon what you're looking for. Many people consider the more suburban areas of the city to be "good," while thinking Port Morris "bad," so it's really a matter of opinion.

    If you're interested in the area, send me a PM.

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    I sort of agree with MrSpice's push for a more prestigious school. If you can get into an ivy or near ivy, I think you can more than make up for your debt with the networking, patronage and snob-appeal. More true in some fields than others - seems from the outside that 'business' is status-oriented enough that it would be a benefit. Wealthier schools are sometimes more generous with aid.

    I don't think a less prestigious private school is at all worth it. You'd get debt and diminished returns on that debt. Often they have lower academic standards than competitive public schools, so the general quality of the education is lower, even if they might have a scenic campus, nice gym and tastier cafeterias. You're paying to be around a specific class of people - the value of that is a personal judgement.

    In general, my advice from the other side is to figure out specifically what you'd like to do (and where you'd like to do it) - even though that's a very difficult thing to do at 18. Ask people who have the job you want how they got it and what they'd do if they could do it again. If you have a clear goal, the path to it will be much more clear.

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    Default CUNY Growth Plans


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