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  1. #1

    Default Financial District

    More Improvements Planned For Financial District

    By Nick Pinto
    POSTED MARCH 11




    Make New York’s financial heart more terrorist-proof, but beautify the streets and make them more pedestrian friendly, too.




    That was the city’s charge to Rogers Marvel Architects, whose designs for handsome sculptural bollards and “euro-cobble” are already in place near the New York Stock Exchange. The bollards replaced concrete barriers and large trucks filled with sand that blocked intersections and protected the exchange after Sept. 11.

    Rob Rogers returned to Community Board 1 on March 5 to explain the firm’s designs for the next phase of work.

    The new designs evoke the neighborhoods grand history, which stretches back to the earliest days of New Amsterdam, when Wall Street earned its name from the stockade that ringed the southern tip of Manhattan. The wall only stood for about 50 years, and its configuration appears to have shifted significantly over that time. But based on their best approximation of its location, the designers plan to embed edge-cut woodblock pavers among the cobblestones of Wall Street to indicate where the wall had been.

    Rogers said his team has similar plans for Broad Street.

    “The reason Broad Street was so broad was that originally, it had a canal running down the middle,” he said. “The Dutch building New Amsterdam sort of thought you needed canals to make a city.”




    To recall the canal, the architects plan to install a black granite inlayed pathway down the middle of Broad Street.

    Along with the ornamental paving work, the renovation of Broad Street will include new traffic restrictions. Under the new security regime, the primary entrance onto Broad Street for vehicles will be from Beaver Street.

    Asked if the new pedestrian-friendly street might be a good place for vendors to set up shop, Rogers demurred.

    “The PD is reluctant to encourage more vendors in the district,” he said.

    The next phase of the project received the go-ahead from the Landmarks Preservation Commission March 4. The architects said they anticipate the work on Broad Street to begin in the late fall.

    Copyright 2008 The Tribeca Tribune.

  2. #2
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    It doesn't show the cow herding fencing around the Stock Exhange or the big roadbloacks on either end. Seems to be very deceptive rendering.

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  4. #4
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Pearl Street Sidewalk Cafe Will Replace Parked Cars with Green Space and Public Seating

    By Julie Shapiro

    The pop-up cafe at Pearl Street at Broad Street could open as soon as two weeks from now.







    FINANCIAL DISTRICT — A pop-up sidewalk cafe is coming to Pearl Street, bringing a taste of San Francisco to the Financial District. But unlike typical sidewalk cafes, this one will extend out into the street, replacing a row of parking spaces with a wooden patio ringed by lush plantings and filled up with public seating. The space, located in a stretch of Pearl Street between Coenties Slip and Broad Street, is scheduled to open by the end of the month and will stay up until November.

    full story


  5. #5

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    Where's the sidewalk?

  6. #6
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    These go up on the street-side of the sidewalk, in the parking lane. The sidewalk remains as it was.

  7. #7
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Very smart idea, now in along Pearl Street opposite the old GS HQ ...

    David Byrne Breaks In NYC's First Pop-Up Cafe

    ... the 84-foot-long, 6-foot-wide wooden platform is landscaped with planters, wire railing and furnished with 14 café tables and 50 chairs. Before everyone hyperventilates, please note that it was paid for and installed by two of the restaurants on the block (Fika Espresso and Bombay's restaurant), but it's open to all regardless of whether they make a purchase.

    These should go in on some of the less busy side streets in mixed use areas all over town.

  8. #8
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Bending the rules to create a sidewalk café

    BY Aline Reynolds

    The Financial District now has a one-of-a-kind lunch spot, the city’s first “pop-up” café. It opened last week on Pearl Street between Broad Street and Coenties Slip, and is meant to stimulate economic growth among food businesses and provide a new hangout for the neighborhood’s residents and workers.

    The café consists of red tables and chairs atop an elevated 84-foot-long, wooden platform, which is surrounded by flower-filled planters.

    “This program... has the potential to provide a needed boost to local restaurants at a time when they face significant challenges due to the state of the economy and the extraordinary amount of construction that is underway throughout our district,” said Community Board 1 chair Julie Menin, in a statement.

    Small city sidewalks such as Pearl Street’s are not allowed to have traditional sidewalk cafés, according to city law.

    “[The pop-up café] really helps solve the riddle of what we needed to do in terms of dealing with this narrow sidewalk,” said city Department of Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan.

    The city held a ribbon cutting ceremony on August 12th, where the city Department of Consumer Affairs, the D.O.T., Downtown Alliance and C.B. 1 spoke about the anticipated benefits of the café.

    “It’s tailored to meet the needs of businesses located [on] very narrow streets,” Sadik-Khan said. “If this experiment works, which we expect it to, we think this could be a new model for sidewalk cafés all around the city.”

    “[The pop-up café] adds a great feeling to the whole block,” said David Johansson, co-owner of FIKA espresso bar, one of two food businesses on Pearl Street that financed the construction of the café.

    “It’s a wonderful addition to the neighborhood,” said C.B. 1 Financial District Committee chairman Ro Sheffe. Amenities such as these are needed, he added, to compensate for the Financial District’s residential growth.

    Eying the success of the outdoor café space on the nearby Stone Street, Johansson and co-owners Prashant and Sonal Bhadd of Bombay restaurant, next door to FIKA, approached Downtown Alliance and the D.O.T. in spring 2009, asking how they could expand their eateries outdoors. The D.O.T. decided to temporarily convert the businesses’ loading zones into a wooden platform with tables and chairs. To make room for the café, D.O.T. eliminated four parking spaces that will be restored in the winter, when the café will be dismantled. For the temporary loss in parking, D.O.T. added two parking spots on Pearl Street, near Coenties Slip to help compensate.

    The D.O.T. sought out R.G. Architecture to design the café, which is modeled after an outdoor space that the firm’s founder and owner, Riyad Ghannam, devised in San Francisco.

    FIKA and Bombay pitched in a total of $22,000 for the construction and are mutually responsible for the café’s upkeep.

    Since it unofficially opened on August 5th, the pop-up café has already attracted a steady stream of pedestrians and is starting to make profits for FIKA and Bombay. Johansson had to hire an additional server to keep the space clean, but said additional patrons easily make up for the cost.

    “Naturally the café has [already] helped increase business a little,” Bhadd said. “We wish to see more in the future,” she added, by spreading the word about the café via the web.

    Delivery trucks would previously block the view of the restaurant from across the street. Now, pedestrians have a clear view.

    While it might help the two businesses’ revenues, Sadik-Khan stressed that the café is a public space for all, not limited to the patrons of the two restaurants.

    “We need to do more to make our streets attractive destinations in it of themselves,” she said.

    As for reintroducing the Pearl Street café next year, Sadik-Khan said, “We’re going to evaluate the program [this year], and take it from there.”

    http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_38...gtherules.html

  9. #9
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Sidewalk Sipping with Sadik-Khan at NYC Pop-Up Cafe

    by Linh Thoi

    Sidewalk cafes have long been a popular feature of New York City dining, but many restaurants’ sidewalks are too narrow to set out tables and chairs without violating city code. Offering a solution to this spatial problem, on August 12 the Department of Transportation (DOT) unveiled its first “pop-up cafe” in Lower Manhattan—an 84-foot-long and 6-foot-wide wooden platform with planters, wire railing, 14 cafe tables, and 50 chairs—as the agency’s latest move to reclaim road space for public use.


    Cor-ten steel planters ring the seating area with English lavender, miniature boxwood, and turf lily.

    The platform is installed in four parking spots in front of two establishments on Pearl Street, Fika’s cafe and Bombay’s restaurant, which approached the Downtown Alliance and DOT earlier this year about ways to expand onto the sidewalk. According to DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan, the agency worked closely with the two restaurants as well as the Downtown Alliance and the Department of Consumer Affairs, which licenses outdoor cafes, to arrive at a workable solution that would provide not only cafe tables but new public space in a part of the city starved for parks. “Inventions like this help make our streets into destinations and improve the quality of life for the thousands of people who live, work, and play in Lower Manhattan,” Sadik-Khan said in a release.


    No purchase necessary; lounging is encouraged.

    The inexpensive platform was designed pro bono by San Francisco–based architect Riyad Ghannam of RG Architecture, who came to the DOT’s attention after an agency intern mentioned a similar design Ghannam had first created for the popular Parking Day event in San Francisco. The DOT then recruited Ghannam to advise on the Lower Manhattan site, and in short order he found himself designing and helping construct the project, for which Bison Innovative Products provided the materials at cost and participated in construction pro bono.

    “It was just barely a month from the concept to actual on-street implementation,” said Ghannam by phone from San Francisco. “The idea is that this is temporary, or at least seasonal, so we wanted the restaurants to have enough time to use it.” The cafe space is maintainted by the two restaurants but freely available for use by the public. The platform and its 12 Cor-ten steel planters will be stored during the winter, when the parking spots will be returned to service.

    The DOT is currently evaluating the cafe to determine if similar temporary spaces should be rolled out elsewhere in the city. The agency would do well to look to San Francisco, which according to Ghannam is studying the revenue potential of streetfront sites that could be rented by adjacent restaurants instead of given over to parking meters. “It’s kind of a win-win,” Ghannam said. “The business gets some stimulus by having more space to use, and the city gets revenue.”


    The platform is located at 66 Pearl Street, near Broad Street and Fraunces Tavern.

    http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/8545

  10. #10

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    This is great. Street parking should be eliminated. If someone is so obstinate and obnoxious to drive into Manhattan, they should be forced to park in a garage. If street parking were eliminated, sidewalks could be widened and landscaped. The above photo is beautiful.

  11. #11
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Wall Street's the 'New Madison Avenue' With Luxury Shops and Condos, Panel Says Updated 85 mins ago

    The "Whither Wall Street" panel addressed the street's post-9/11 recovery and potential growth in the future.

    By Julie Shapiro







    FINANCIAL DISTRICT — Wall Street’s future is bright, a panel of experts said Wednesday evening — but they weren’t talking about the financial markets.

    Instead, the panelists at "Whither Wall Street" focused on the street itself — its buildings, its public spaces and its population — all of which have changed dramatically since 9/11.

    "This is the new Madison Avenue," Kent Swig, a Financial District developer, told a rapt crowd of about 100 people at the Museum of American Finance.

    Like the rest of the Financial District, Wall Street saw a post-9/11 residential boom, adding nearly 3,000 residential units in less than 10 years. Luxury retail followed, with Hermes, Tiffany and BMW all adding outposts on the street.

    Swig said New Yorkers have long undervalued lower Manhattan, which has one of the highest per capita income and education levels in the country.

    Despite the recession, the Financial District’s fundamentals — access to transportation, retail and public spaces — will help Wall Street’s office and residential developments bounce back, Swig predicted.

    "The downturn is only going to make it more surprising to people," he said.

    Not all of the post-9/11 changes have been positive, however.

    In the days after the attacks, military-style barricades popped up all around Wall Street, restricting cars and pedestrians especially on the west end near the New York Stock Exchange.

    "Lower Manhattan was being consumed by security," architect Rob Rogers said at Wednesday’s panel. "The corner of Wall and Broad streets was almost impassable."

    The city hired Rogers’s firm, Rogers Marvel Architects, several years ago to overhaul the streetscape.

    The bronze bollards and cobblestone turntables Rogers designed were so artistic and contextual that the MoMA put them on display. Today, many tourists who pose or relax on the bollards don’t even realize that they serve a security function, Rogers said.

    Now, the city and the Downtown Alliance are turning their attention to Wall Street’s less-well-known eastern end, which slopes down toward the East River.

    Along the river, the city is well into the $150 million reconstruction of the East River Waterfront, complete with a new esplanade, seating and plantings, which could begin to open in 2012.

    And the Downtown Alliance recently proposed creating a large pedestrian plaza on the two eastern blocks of Wall Street leading down to the water. The blocks of Wall between Water and South streets could host large-scale events, like markets, concerts and art exhibits, said Liz Berger, president of the Downtown Alliance.

    Ultimately, Wall Street will be successful if planners remember that it has also become a Main Street, Berger said.

    "In lower Manhattan," she said, "they’re the same street."

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20101014/down...#ixzz12QWRUx00

  12. #12
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    What about practical/essentials shopping outlets?


    New Website Aims to Lure Residents to the Financial District


    FiDiDigs.com battles the impression that the Financial District is a sleepy place to live.

    By Julie Shapiro







    FINANCIAL DISTRICT — Lak Vohra is on a mission to convince people to move to the Financial District.

    Vohra, 45, a broker who has lived downtown for a year and a half, just launched FiDiDigs.com, a website dedicated to marketing the neighborhood as a fun, affordable place to live.

    "A lot of people think this is a sleepy part of town, but that's not really true," Vohra said this week. "There is something to do every day and every night. It really is a hidden jewel in Manhattan."

    Blog posts on FiDiDigs.com, which went live three weeks ago, spread the word about the neighborhood's entertaining possibilities, from late-night dance parties at Ulysses' on Pearl Street to the romantic restaurants that ring Peck Slip's cobblestoned blocks.

    In the past decade, the Financial District has seen an explosion in residential growth. The population south of Murray and John streets has more than tripled from 8,200 in 2000 to about 26,500 this year, according to Community Board 1 estimates. Today, more people live in the Financial District than in TriBeCa, Battery Park City or the Seaport.

    Vohra hopes to connect with this new community and is planning high-end social events for local residents and workers, including a gathering in a cigar shop.

    To help prospective renters looking to move to the Financial District, Vohra is also offering a roommate matchmaking service that held its first meet-and-greet event last weekend at Hot Clay Oven on Maiden Lane.

    One of the 50 people who attended Vohra's party last weekend was 24-year-old Robert Pierpont, who was looking for one more roommate to round out the three-bedroom he just leased on Gold Street.

    Pierpont had looked at complexes in Gramercy and Murray Hill, but from the moment he laid eyes on the Financial District, he was sold.

    "It's the best bang for your buck," said Pierpont, who works in pharmaceutical sales. "You get a lot more amenities here."

    While the Financial District does get quieter once all the workers go home, Pierpont said he doesn't mind.

    "I like the atmosphere better down here," he said. "It's more homey — it feels like a neighborhood."

    Pierpont and others praised the bustling restaurant scene on Stone Street and the cheaper bars near Fulton Street. The South Street Seaport has frequent events, especially in the summer, and there are lots of museums with free public programs, locals said.

    Another roommate seeker at last weekend's party was Jenny Jin, 26, who said she was initially wary of lower Manhattan because the tall buildings block so much of the sky.

    "I used to live in England, and I've had enough of not having sun," Jin said.

    But the Financial District is winning Jin over with its young professional vibe. Jin said she feels more comfortable in the canyons of Wall Street than on the stroller-packed Upper West Side, where she currently lives, and she hopes to move soon.

    "Now, I am thinking FiDi," she said.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20110224/down...#ixzz1ExtXhFe0

  13. #13

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    I love this area. It has far more charm that Midtown. I always feel relaxed when walking among these narrow, twisty streets.

  14. #14

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    Disappointing:

    Community Board 2 opposes five of six new "pop-up" sidewalk cafes
    * March 25, 2011 By Carter B. Horsley

    http://www.cityrealty.com/new-york-c...-horsley/40062


    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    Sidewalk Sipping with Sadik-Khan at NYC Pop-Up Cafe

    by Linh Thoi

    Sidewalk cafes have long been a popular feature of New York City dining, but many restaurants’ sidewalks are too narrow to set out tables and chairs without violating city code. Offering a solution to this spatial problem, on August 12 the Department of Transportation (DOT) unveiled its first “pop-up cafe” in Lower Manhattan—an 84-foot-long and 6-foot-wide wooden platform with planters, wire railing, 14 cafe tables, and 50 chairs—as the agency’s latest move to reclaim road space for public use.


    Cor-ten steel planters ring the seating area with English lavender, miniature boxwood, and turf lily.

    The platform is installed in four parking spots in front of two establishments on Pearl Street, Fika’s cafe and Bombay’s restaurant, which approached the Downtown Alliance and DOT earlier this year about ways to expand onto the sidewalk. According to DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan, the agency worked closely with the two restaurants as well as the Downtown Alliance and the Department of Consumer Affairs, which licenses outdoor cafes, to arrive at a workable solution that would provide not only cafe tables but new public space in a part of the city starved for parks. “Inventions like this help make our streets into destinations and improve the quality of life for the thousands of people who live, work, and play in Lower Manhattan,” Sadik-Khan said in a release.


    No purchase necessary; lounging is encouraged.

    The inexpensive platform was designed pro bono by San Francisco–based architect Riyad Ghannam of RG Architecture, who came to the DOT’s attention after an agency intern mentioned a similar design Ghannam had first created for the popular Parking Day event in San Francisco. The DOT then recruited Ghannam to advise on the Lower Manhattan site, and in short order he found himself designing and helping construct the project, for which Bison Innovative Products provided the materials at cost and participated in construction pro bono.

    “It was just barely a month from the concept to actual on-street implementation,” said Ghannam by phone from San Francisco. “The idea is that this is temporary, or at least seasonal, so we wanted the restaurants to have enough time to use it.” The cafe space is maintainted by the two restaurants but freely available for use by the public. The platform and its 12 Cor-ten steel planters will be stored during the winter, when the parking spots will be returned to service.

    The DOT is currently evaluating the cafe to determine if similar temporary spaces should be rolled out elsewhere in the city. The agency would do well to look to San Francisco, which according to Ghannam is studying the revenue potential of streetfront sites that could be rented by adjacent restaurants instead of given over to parking meters. “It’s kind of a win-win,” Ghannam said. “The business gets some stimulus by having more space to use, and the city gets revenue.”


    The platform is located at 66 Pearl Street, near Broad Street and Fraunces Tavern.

    http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/8545

  15. #15
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    The arguments against are a load of crap.

    Those roads are never that busy, so pollutants are not an issue. And they never attract the "vermin" that these people say they do.

    All they need to do is restrict the usage hours like they do in many areas (say "all inside" by 10?) and keep it clean and there will be no problem. But so many people are NIMBY's and parking addicts that they are willing to say no to anything.

    What does that 72 year old grouch have against a sidewalk café? Maybe he just does not like seeing people enjoy themselves.

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