Page 2 of 15 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 221

Thread: Proposed: 23 East 22nd Street - Flatiron District - Condo - by Rem Koolhaas

  1. #16
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    And is that really a bad thing (a little extravagance that is), ablarc?

  2. #17

    Default

    Well, it's not my cup of tea.

  3. #18

    Default

    Elegance over Rube Goldbergianism?

  4. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    west village
    Posts
    437

    Default

    i gotta agree with nimby. let's also not lose track of what people will pay to live in this building. sounds like it's not as of yet, but it will likely sell out. people will pay for the koolhass stunt/solution.

    besides, imo as architectural stunts go this one still pales vs the standard hotel.

  5. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasonik View Post
    Elegance over Rube Goldbergianism?
    Yeah. Have you seen The Prestige?

  6. #21
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    It's his ticket to fame.

  7. #22
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    I tried googling, but no luck ...

    What is The Prestige?

  8. #23
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    It's a movie. Check IMDB. The Times did a big article about retrofutureism recently, and used that movie as a springboard for that particular aesthetic.

  9. #24

    Default

    Retrofuturism, huh?

    These days they cook up a new name for everything.

  10. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    ... What you're perhaps overlooking is that all Koolhaas' buildings are stunts. He seeks to frame every architectural problem in terms of how he can turn it into a stunt.

    The fact that you can identify the process that led there makes it only a bit less of a stunt. The exhibitionism comes first and the program is an excuse to rationalize it.
    That Pritzker Prize he received for his work was surely a mistake. Add to it the Seattle Public Library, Royal Dutch Embassy in Berlin, CCTV in Beijing etc., all just stunts.

    Hmmm, I am learning as I go on WNY ...

  11. #26

    Default

    The recent fashion in (st)architecture has been to fetishize the spectacular.

    I think I get what ablarc is saying.

    Take Frank Lloyd Wright who for decades labored carefully on diverse typological projects developing his theories and technical skill when finally -- in a genius stroke -- caught lightning in a bottle and produced the Guggenheim, an idiosyncratic expression of program writ large in bold sculptural form.

    This singular conception of architecture can be seen as the entire animating principle of Koolhaas' work.

    Ultimately, I think this is really an analysis of typology (formalism) versus functionalism. The purpose of liberating architecture from typology is to free it from formal constraints that limit function. On the other hand, to discard the trappings of typology as a foundational ideological parti thus ensuring an a-formal spectacular result can be seen as a stunt.

  12. #27
    Senior Swanky Peteynyc1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen
    Posts
    732

    Default

    When you sell your air rights I guess you sell your sunshine rights as well?

  13. #28

    Default

    That statement about "...all Koolhaas' buildings are stunts" is as black-and-white as it comes, Jasonik. What is there to understand?

    And just like there are people who don't agree with you, I, and a number of others about Robert A. M. Stern, I can also assume that there would be quite a few Architects and others that would not agree with ablarc about Rem Koolhaas.

    If the statement were confined to this building at 23 E 22nd, and/or a number of others I can think of at this moment, I would find myself in reluctant agreement. But his statement was all inclusive. If the truth be known, I am not a fan of all things Rem Koolhaas, because his work comes with its paradoxes and failures, as well as what you termed "the spectacular" and original. It is the latter that goes down the drain, however, if you accept ablarc's view. Having that view, on the other hand, is what makes this world go around - we all have different takes, and I won't call him "brainwashed" for having his.

    There is no school that Rem Koolhaas belongs to, and each effort can be easily misread not as exploration but as an attempt to stand apart as a stunt. Yet Mr. Koolhaas often re-examines forms and shapes, both inside and out. An example is stacking of floors at right angles, in different volumes and different shapes - can be read as attempting to bring attention to itself by some or rethinking the form each time, by others.


    .
    Last edited by Zephyr; August 26th, 2008 at 06:22 PM.

  14. #29

    Default

    Disagreement is all well and good when discussing (capital A)rchitecture, but part and parcel with the eye-candy and innovative forms must be an understanding and discussion of ideas. The design principles and methodology of Koolhaas presuppose certain decision making imperatives that drive his work. To truly and honestly critique his work -- on its own terms and in more general terms -- we must unpack his implicit and explicit ideology from the final built object (i.e. re-read ablarc's full post).

    While I appreciate Rem's intellectual modus operandi, personally I find it rather insubstantial when compared with more 'honest' architecture reflected in Thom Mayne's humor and humanity or Herzog & de Meuron's explorations of surface and materiality -- each just as spectacular and original -- but exceeding Koolhaas in what I can only describe as 'soul.'

  15. #30

    Default

    In the NY Times Magazine issue about the future of the WTC site, Koolhaas proposed a tower with setbacks, turned upside down. That idea appears to have been partly reused in this design.

Page 2 of 15 FirstFirst 12345612 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. East 57th Street Tops Retail List Highest Rents In the World
    By noharmony in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: January 30th, 2008, 01:33 PM
  2. J Condo - 100 Jay Street - DUMBO - by Gruzen Samton
    By Edward in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: October 3rd, 2007, 08:46 AM
  3. Station Renovation - East New York
    By Gulcrapek in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: July 30th, 2004, 10:59 AM
  4. East Coast Greenway
    By ZippyTheChimp in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: June 9th, 2003, 10:37 AM
  5. East River - large file
    By ZippyTheChimp in forum Photos and Videos of New York
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: March 31st, 2003, 05:50 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software