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Thread: New York City Transit News

  1. #31
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Yikes! I forgot that they turned the R into the W.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by DKNY617 View Post
    As I said on SSP.com, I live in Astoria and if they cut the W line its going to be tragic! The crowds waiting during rush hour are so large in Astoria that reducing the service in half is going to do a lot of damage. I wait during rush hour sometimes even when 3-4 trains pass by because they are just too full and I do not want to be squished like a sardine, so I can imagine what is going to happen if the W is cut. I won't be a happy camper.
    Service in Astoria won't be cut in half. The "cuts" listed in the article are deceiving. By cutting the W it will probably just mean Astoria residents will lose one-seat rides to the financial district via the W but N service over the bridge during will most likely be increased to help fill some of the gap. No doubt service would be decreased but it won't be "halved".

  3. #33

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    The R was not made the W unless that happened in the last few months. I dont see the point in getting rid of the W to cut costs and increasing N trains, that doesnt make any sense.

  4. #34

    Angry The News Just Never Gets Better

    NY1

    Updated 12:10 PM

    Sources: MTA To Hike Fares Still Higher



    Newly-revealed details about the MTA's so-called “Doomsday Budget” show that mass transit will overall become even more expensive for New Yorkers.

    According to sources close to the MTA's budget process, the agency is considering raising fare and toll revenue by 23 percent, nearly three times as high as the eight percent that had originally been talked about.

    The MTA has some flexibility as to how an increase is allocated. It can apply to pay-per-ride customers or discounted MetroCards or both.

    To help raise that revenue, sources say the MTA is looking at raising the fare for Access-a-Ride service to twice the base MetroCard fare, which is now $2 but is expected to rise.

    The agency is also looking to raise the fare for express bus rides from $5 to $7.50.

    The combined ridership of both services is more than 100,000 a day.

    Express bus riders were dismayed at the proposed hikes.

    "I don't know what's going on. I don't know if I can afford it or not. I don't know how I'm going to get back and forth from work," said a rider.

    "It's a lot, because I don't have any other choice, but to take the express bus. I don't have a train near where I am. So that's a lot for people who don't have any other option," said another.

    "I wish they wouldn't have to do that. But what can you do? They have a deficit. But they should find other ways to close the deficit, maybe get more money from the government," said a third.

    Elected officials say Albany lawmakers need to shift the burden away from those who can least afford to pay more.

    "I quite frankly don't know what's going on in Albany. I'm not there any more," said Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer. " But clearly they've got to wake up and think bigger and bolder. And I believe very strongly that it's time to reinstate the commuter tax, earmark it to mass transit, because this kind of transit increase is going to be a tipping point for people to flee this city."

    The MTA will unveil its complete slate of cost-cutting proposals at a board meeting tomorrow.

    It's also been reported that officials will call for the elimination of the W and Z subway lines, slashing the G and M lines in half and eliminating express service on the Z train.

    Dozens of bus routes would be eliminated and hundreds of jobs could be cut.

    MTA officials blame plummeting tax revenues for their deficit and say the agency is in serious need of state aid.


    Copyright © 2008 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

  5. #35
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Wink So much for my dream.

    Quote Originally Posted by alonzo-ny View Post
    The R was not made the W unless that happened in the last few months.
    I thought you were going to start ignoring me.

  6. #36

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    NY1

    Updated 11:23 AM

    Minor LIRR Accident Delays Trains



    There are systemwide delays on the Long Island Rail Road after two trains bumped into each other leaving Jamaica Station this morning.

    The railroad says it was a minor accident, but it caused big delays.

    The two trains were evacuated and two people were hospitalized.

    Local trains are experiencing 45-minute delays in both directions between Penn Station, Jamaica, Kew Gardens and Forest Hills.

    NYC Transit is honoring LIRR tickets at Jamaica, Forest Hills and Kew Gardens, and cross-honoring LIRR tickets at the E, F, J and Z trains at Jamaica and Penn Stations.

    The cause of the accident is under investigation.



    Copyright © 2008 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

  7. #37
    Senior Member DKNY617's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spatulashack View Post
    Service in Astoria won't be cut in half. The "cuts" listed in the article are deceiving. By cutting the W it will probably just mean Astoria residents will lose one-seat rides to the financial district via the W but N service over the bridge during will most likely be increased to help fill some of the gap. No doubt service would be decreased but it won't be "halved".
    N service over the bridge? What to Brooklyn? I am not concerned with trains going to Brooklyn when I don't go to Brooklyn. I'm concerned with longer wait times going to and from Manhattan to Astoria. I am also concerned with already crowded trains getting even more crowded. If there are 2 train lines in one neighborhood and you get rid of one, that is cutting it in half right there. Increasing N service can only be increased SO much, but it doesn't compensate for a whole train line being eliminated.

    And to answer any questions, no the R line wasn't changed to a W line. The W line is completely different from the R line.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by stache View Post
    I thought you were going to start ignoring me.
    Sorry to disappoint you but I couldnt let people be misinformed.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by DKNY617 View Post
    N service over the bridge? What to Brooklyn? I am not concerned with trains going to Brooklyn when I don't go to Brooklyn. I'm concerned with longer wait times going to and from Manhattan to Astoria. I am also concerned with already crowded trains getting even more crowded. If there are 2 train lines in one neighborhood and you get rid of one, that is cutting it in half right there. Increasing N service can only be increased SO much, but it doesn't compensate for a whole train line being eliminated.

    And to answer any questions, no the R line wasn't changed to a W line. The W line is completely different from the R line.
    Why would they increase N service when the idea of cutting the W is to cut costs?? Cuts would be pointless if you increase N service which would increase costs again!!

  10. #40
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Something smells fishy.

    I seriously doubt it costs THAT much to run extra lines on an already overcrowded route. The ones that lose money are the ones that have limited ridership, like off-hour runs, or end-runs out to the remote reaches of each line.

    I am not saying cut those either, but I sense there is a lot of waste that needs to e re-evaluated. Also, contracts of EVERYONE, from track cleaner to MTA officials needs to be re-evaluated in this financial situation and either reduced, or positions eliminated top to bottom. City jobs should not be so protected in times of trouble that contracts cannot be re-written.

    But in all fairness, those contracts should not be just the service level. Admins usually have much more care and attension for things that effect them as well....



    I wonder, is this problem from further state cuts, or because whatever $$ they had was put in the market?

  11. #41

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    NY1

    Updated 3:14 PM

    MTA Budget Plan Includes "Drastic" Fare Hikes, Service Cuts




    The Metropolitan Transportation Authority unveiled its 2009 budget at a board meeting today in Midtown, following a period of public comment.

    The so-called "Doomsday Budget" will sock riders with a steep fare hike and major service cuts.

    MTA Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer Elliot "Lee Sander" said the agency is considering increasing fare and toll revenue by 23 percent to help close a $1.2 billion budget gap projected for next year. The gap is predicted to swell to $3 billion by 2012.

    The agency could completely scrap bus and subway routes, including the M8 crosstown bus and the W and Z trains and several express bus routes.

    Twenty-one local bus routes could also be eliminated during weekday hours. In Manhattan, the routes that would be eliminated would be the M6, M8, M10, M18, M27, and M30.

    "The service cuts I'm proposing today are guided by two principles that we believe are essential: first, that we continue to insure safety, security, and reliability," said Sander. "And second, that we maintain our fundemental mission – getting people where they need to go."

    According to the MTA, the routes proposed for elimination have "practical bus and or subway alternatives for customers along the entire length of the route."

    Pay-per-ride and unlimited-ride MetroCards, along with fares for express buses and Access-a-Ride service could all be increased.

    Also proposed were New York City Transit and MetroNorth job cuts.

    The MTA proposed eliminating 2,500 positions in the subway and bus system alone – saving $300 million a year.

    Following Sander's presentation of the budget cuts necessary, board members spoke about what other taxes could be implemented.

    Board member Norman Seabrook proposed a sin tax that would raise the taxes on cigarettes.

    During a press conference after the meeting, Sander says many of the proposals could be scaled back if the state Legislature acts by February or March to forestall the fare increases and service cuts. The state could act if the Ravitch Commission, which is investigating new ways of funding the MTA, comes up with viable alternative funding solutions that could alleviate some of the pain.

    Among the dozen who testified ahead of the budget announcement were Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, Gene Russianoff of the Straphangers Campaign, an MTA station agent, and several transit union representatives.

    All implored the agency to find other methods of gaining funding beside a fare increase and service cuts.

    "This is not just about putting the burden of the MTA on the backs of hard-working New Yorkers," said Stringer. "We cannot simply announce proposals today that say to people barely making it that 'we're going to sink you.'"

    Dozens gathered outside the meeting early this morning to protest the proposed cuts. Later, many testified before the MTA board.



    "The riders are not happy about being asked to pay a lot more for a lot less," said Gene Russianoff of the Straphangers Campaign. "Our hope is that the MTA and the legislative leaders will hear the cry of the riding public and come up with a fare solution to evenly spread the cost of transit."

    "We're basically here today to say that the banks, and not the riders, should be the ones to bail out the MTA," said Tony Murphy of advocacy group Bail Out the People.

    A series of public hearing on the proposed fare hike are scheduled for January.
    Any changes would take effect in June.

    Complete List Of Bus Routes To Be Affected
    Local Routes That Face Elimination: B23, B25, B37, B39, B51, B75; Bx4, Bx14, Bx20, Bx34; M6, M8, M10, M18, M27, M30; Q26, Q56, Q74, Q75, Q84
    Express Routes That Face Elimination: X25, X32, QM22, QM23 and BxM7B
    Local Routes That Will Lose Both Weekend And Overnight Service:
    B7, B48, B57, B65, M22 and M50


    Copyright © 2008 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

  12. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by alonzo-ny View Post
    Why would they increase N service when the idea of cutting the W is to cut costs?? Cuts would be pointless if you increase N service which would increase costs again!!
    You're missing all the things that go into running a seperate service. It's less expensive and less complicated to have trains travel between the same 2 terminals than to have 2 seperate lines that use different terminals and require different crews. Also, any increases in N service wouldn't necessarily mean the frequencies would be the same as the W and N combined. It just means they wouldn't let the Astoria line turn into a complete disaster of overcrowding.

  13. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by DKNY617 View Post
    If there are 2 train lines in one neighborhood and you get rid of one, that is cutting it in half right there.
    That isn't how it works at all. If the MTA were to cut C service along 8th Avenue, local service would not be "cut in half" because the C and the E have different frequencies with the E running more often than the C. Service would be cut, but not "halved."

  14. #44

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    NY1

    Updated 9:22 AM

    Transportation Department Issues Gridlock Alert Day



    Today is the first Gridlock Alert Day of the holiday season.

    The city says the combination of regular traffic plus visitors and pedestrians will make it particularly hard to move around town.

    The New York City Department of Transportation is advising people to use mass transit.

    There are eight more designated gridlock alert days this year.

    The next one comes on Wednesday, the day before Thanksgiving.



    Copyright © 2008 NY1 News. All rights reserved.

  15. #45

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    Ok so I did some further digging just to clarify this once and for all. The proposal (according to the MTA documents) is to eliminate the W but extend the Q into Astoria. Astoria would see no service cuts. The only thing that would change is the frequency of service along Broadway and the lack of a one-seat ride for Astoria residents who wish to travel below Prince street.

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