Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678
Results 106 to 118 of 118

Thread: New York City Transit News

  1. #106
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    Another example of MTA idiocy. I took part in a survey last week that paid $20.00. I made a diary of all travel 1/27 (including walking) then I phoned a rep with the info. Rep had very obviously never been on a train and asked extremely stupid questions. I was initially tempted just to say that I stayed home all day and in the long run I wish I had lied. It was that bad. So now MTA will have false information as I gave up correcting rep as he clearly did not 'get it' in the most basic sense.

  2. #107

    Default Cheap Buses May Face Restrictions on Locations

    Cheap Buses May Face Restrictions on Locations

    By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

    Published: February 3, 2011

    Stricter regulation could be on the way for discount bus companies that operate on New York City streets, under a bill to be introduced on Friday in Albany that aims to put an end to complaints that the buses clog sidewalks and block thoroughfares in Chinatown and Midtown.

    The discount buses, bulky squatters that often idle in the city’s curbside loading zones, have long been a bane of businesses and residents concerned about congestion, noise and risky conditions for pedestrians.

    But the city’s hands have, for the most part, been tied: although the buses are subject to federal rules, the city’s Department of Transportation cannot ban them from existing bus stops or no-standing zones.

    The bill, if approved, would open the door for the city to establish designated pick-up and drop-off locations for the buses and require a permit to operate in the city. Any proposed locations would face review by community boards and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

    The bill will be sponsored in the State Assembly by that body’s speaker, Sheldon Silver, all but ensuring its passage. Mr. Silver’s Manhattan district includes a dense area of Chinatown that is a home base for many discount bus companies started in the past decade.

    “They put themselves near crosswalks,” Mr. Silver said in an interview on Thursday.

    “They double-park, and it’s all hours of the day and night. We want to bring some order to this chaotic situation.”

    Companies like BoltBus and Megabus have gained popularity with their low fares, offering rides to Boston for as low as $1, for example. But their occupancy along the West 34th Street corridor in Midtown has drawn the anger of restaurant and building owners who say they have lost customers because of the intrusion.

    “The buses line up on the whole block, so if you’re across the street you can’t see the businesses,” said Martin Whelan, an owner of Stout NYC, an Irish pub on West 33rd Street.

    He said the buses sent fumes wafting into his bar around happy hour, and that suitcase-carrying passengers waiting in line blocked the sidewalk around the same time hordes of commuters were heading to nearby Pennsylvania Station.

    A spokesman for BoltBus, Timothy Stokes, said that his company actively cooperated with the city in determining curbside locations. “As long as each curbside carrier is treated equally in their operations, we are fine with any changes the city deems necessary,” Mr. Stokes wrote in an e-mail.

    An official at Megabus said the company would welcome additional cooperation with the city.

    State Senator Daniel L. Squadron, who is spearheading the legislation, said he did not want the rules to hurt the industry.

    “They have been good for travel in the Northeast corridor,” Mr. Squadron said.

    But he said the scramble for curbside space and shifting loading zones, with their potential to confuse customers, had produced an atmosphere akin to the Wild West.

    Shortly before 5 p.m. on Thursday, a group of passengers with knapsacks, duffel bags and rolling suitcases assembled outside the offices of the Fung Wah bus service on Canal Street by the foot of the Manhattan Bridge.

    Sam Wright, 20, of Greenwich, Conn., was waiting to board a bus to Boston to visit friends, a trip he said he made once or twice a month. “They’re cheap, they’re fast,” Mr. Wright said, as the crowd was led to an idling bus on the Bowery. “I’ve never had a problem.”

    Would Mr. Wright support increased scrutiny by the city? “As long as the price doesn’t change,” he said with a shrug.


    Colin Moynihan contributed reporting.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/04/ny...l?ref=nyregion

  3. #108
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Nairobi Hilton
    Posts
    8,511

    Default

    That's the problem I've always had with this kind of bus. It's always hard to figure out where the bus you need to board will be.

  4. #109
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    New York to pay engineering firm to analyze
    extension of 7 train to New Jersey


    NY DAILY NEWS

  5. #110
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Love the taxi's "passenger" .

    The MTA are being drongoes again .


    MTA Not A Fan Of MetroCard Artists



    [UPDATED BELOW] East Village artist VH McKenzie has been adorning discarded MetroCards and selling them at her Etsy shop, but the MTA is not a fan of her work. According to EV Grieve, they sent her a letter (which you can read in full below), essentially asking her to cease sales of the paintings because they were created on top of the MTA’s intellectual property, which is protected by copyright and trademark law. They offered to discuss licensing deal with her, however, which would presumably make them some extra cash. So what does she have to say about all of this? On her Tumblr she declared:
    My big bad oil paintings, on the surface of discarded MetroCards subway cards, are apparently a huge threat to the sanctity of the MTA’s intellectual property. Unless, of course, I want to throw down some big cash and pay for the privilege of referencing the MTA in any way. That ain’t gonna happen. And I wonder if the MTA is aware of this event. Check it out—a full gallery exhibit of art work on MetroCards, solicited from artists from around the world.

    So this begs the question—Why single me out? A full-scale gallery show is permitted, at top-notch prices of $100 per card, but my handful of offerings on Etsy, and at a lower price, are not?
    We contacted the MTA for their comment on this matter, and will update when we hear back. Wonder if they know about this bench...

    UPDATE: The MTA's Aaron Donovan tells us, "We're sorry the artist felt the letter was heavy handed. Whenever we find someone profiting from our trademarks, instead of simply asking them to cease and desist, we try to politely offer an opportunity to enter into a revenue-sharing arrangement. Typically, an artist or other trademark user would be able to keep 90% of the net revenue and would be able to promote the product as officially licensed by the MTA. And the public would be entitled to 10% of the net revenue from the use of the trademark. We approach large firms and individual artists in the same way, and some choose to participate and some don't. It isn't the size of the trademark usage that matters, but the principle. Every dollar the MTA earns from licensing revenue is a dollar that isn't earned from fares."

    And regarding the MetroCard art show linked to above, it has been pointed out to us that displaying art isn't something the MTA has an issue with—they only reach out when someone is selling items that use their trademark.

    http://gothamist.com/2011/04/08/mta_...ard_artist.php

  6. #111
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    The response seems fair and well met.

    Too bad they could not say it that way the first time around.

  7. #112
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Of course the MTA carefully guards all those empty but valuable Metrocards. That's why they leave them scattered all over the floors of subway stations.

  8. #113
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    Probably the best thing that ever happened to her, people will be knocking on her door all summer long now to buy her MC paintings

    Hello -- my SUBWAY CARD PAINTINGS have currently all SOLD OUT! If you are interested in a in purchasing one in the future, please send me a convo or email me - info [!at] vhmckenzie.com - and I will gladly give you a heads up when more are available. I hope to have more in my shop by April 17, 2011. Thanks for visiting!

  9. #114

    Default

    I think a good lawyer could fight this successfully. It's not like she's copying their logo. She's using their own printed material, for which they were paid, that was subsequently discarded. Since they themselves printed it, she's not violating their copywright.

    Then again, it would probably cost her orders of magnetude more money to fight them in court than she'd make selling her work.

  10. #115
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Mayor Bloomberg Gives Up on Fixing the M.T.A.

    By Matt Chaban
    Jan-06-2012


    Don't mind me. (Business Insider)

    Mayor Bloomberg was asked about Jay Walder’s glum assessment of the M.T.A. yesterday. He agreed with the ousted transit chief and then proceeded to throw up his hands, passing the buck to the governor, according to Capital New York.


    “Keep in mind, it’s all relative,” said the mayor. “When I came to New York in 1966, the subway cars were covered in graffiti, they broke down all the time, they had no signalling.”

    “Having said that,” he continued, “if you compare today’s M.T.A. system here to modern M.T.A. systems, and I have been on the Hong Kong system, it’s an order of magnitude more modern, and that’s what we have to do.”

    By “we,” Bloomberg, whose third term expires at the end of next year, really meant “they.”

    “It’s a state problem,” he said. “They’ve got to find the monies.”

    The mayor later added that the state of the M.T.A. is “hurting our economy.”

    “That’s where I think the governor really can do something here,” he said. “But he’s got to get the legislature together and find funding for the M.T.A. And I’ll be happy to help him, but I certainly don’t want to get in the ways of, be an impediment to him doing this.”


    Will the mayor even bother to “take” the subway when he’s out of office?

    http://www.observer.com/2012/01/mayo...ing-the-m-t-a/

  11. #116

    Default

    February 14, 2012

    Transit Funding May Jump the Tracks

    Nadler Asks for Support Against Congressional Measure
    That Would Kill Subway and Bus Subsidies


    Four mega-projects in the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) budget, including the Fulton Transit Center, which is slated to open in 2014, are in danger of losing funds if a transportation reform act passes the House of Representatives tomorrow as presently written. Last Tuesday, Lower Manhattan's representative in the House, Jerrold Nadler, spoke out against the bill at a joint press conference with congressional colleagues, Joseph Lhota, the MTA's chairman and CEO, and other stakeholders, under the iconic starry ceiling of Grand Central Terminal. Yesterday, Mr. Nadler introduced a bipartisan amendment to the bill during Monday's House session.

    The American Energy and Infrastructure Jobs Act (HR-7) would strip away the mass transportation's dedicated funding stream after fiscal year 2016. Since 1983, when former President Ronald Reagan signed into law the Surface Transportation Assistance Act, public transportation has been funded by a percentage of the federal gasoline tax. Currently, the federal government collects a bit more than 18 cents per gallon on taxes for regular gasoline, of which approximately 2.9 cents goes to fund mass transit and highway projects. In 2010, that amounted to more than $1 billion every year for the Mass Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund. These funds pay for maintaining and planning subways, buses, commuter rails, and other forms of public transit nationwide. In New York City alone, an estimated seven million residents, and an unspecified number of suburban commuters, use mass transit every day.

    "Make no mistake: As the largest mass transit agency in the country, this bill would hit the MTA hard," said Mr. Lhota at last week's press conference. Other mega projects that would be affected by reduced funding include the Second Avenue Subway Project, the East Side Access Project, and the 7 Line Extension Project.

    Mr. Nadler, who also sits on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, said yesterday, "HR-7, as written, presents a catastrophic prospect for every city and commuter suburb in our nation. To eliminate transit's dedicated funding stream and relegate funding to the political machinations of the appropriations process is, effectively, to kill transit funding." Mr. Nadler's amendment, co-sponsored by 11 other members of Congress from both parties, would restore the dedicated funding stream for public transportation programs by preserving the Mass Transit Account, and redirecting the $40 billion appropriation now contained in HR-7 back into the Highway Trust Fund for highways and transit.

    When asked what residents can do, Mr. Nadler said, "The more people communicate about it in the social media channels the better. Look what happened with the Susan G. Komen Foundation when it tried to pull funding from Planned Parenthood!"

    Dianne Renzulli

  12. #117
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    It annoys me when the "representatives" from other areas are so quick to spend, or reappropriate, money that is really not theirs.

    the argument may be "We spend more on gas than you do", but that can easily be turned around to say "we EARN more than you do, and are taxed more because of it. you give us our money back and we will let you keep the 2.9 cents per gallon...."


  13. #118
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Jersey City
    Posts
    4,449

    Default

    Double talk is beautiful isn't it?

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678

Similar Threads

  1. New York City Books
    By Merry in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 172
    Last Post: October 6th, 2015, 12:41 AM
  2. Should New York State and City Split?
    By Agglomeration in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 107
    Last Post: January 8th, 2010, 10:48 AM
  3. New York City Burgers
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 66
    Last Post: December 8th, 2008, 10:20 AM
  4. Christmas Trees of New York City
    By noharmony in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: November 10th, 2006, 04:08 AM
  5. New York City Photos - 2003 Calendar
    By Merry in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: January 13th, 2003, 06:26 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software