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Thread: HL23 - 515 West 23rd Street - Condo - Chelsea - by Neil Denari

  1. #61

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    I am amazed at the quality of the projects in this area. It is an architectural showcase.

    Huge wangs like Ross, Macklowe, Moinian and Chang should walk through here and see what great buildings look like.

  2. #62
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Some recent shots ...

















    *

  3. #63
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    More ...















    *

  4. #64
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    glad to see so much construction activity on the highline around there!

  5. #65

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    I absolutely love this one.

  6. #66

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    From last week...




  7. #67
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Cotton Field Getting Planted Under High Line's HL23

    June 28, 2010, by Sara



    Two years ago, a fake cotton field appeared at the corner of Lafayette and Houston streets. The field is on its way back to New York for the summer, but this time it will be planted under the High Line, as part of a new event space. Archpaper has renderings of the project, designed by Konyk Architecture and going right under HL23 (the prefab structure now housing the building's sales office will soon host a series of pop-up shops instead). In addition to seats made out of cotton bales and a plywood "flat field" meant to look like a "fiberlike landscape based on the botanical profiles of Pima cotton," Craig Konyk says the design includes "a mirror where you can look up through a slot and see the facade" of HL23. Warning: brain explosions may result.
    Plus, it'll all glow at night:



    Konyk Cotton Field Blooms Under the High Line [Archpaper]
    Houston Street Gets Cotton Field it was Sorely Lacking [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...lines_hl23.php

  8. #68
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    via iphone yesterday:




  9. #69
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    Second portion of the HL looking about complete from this vantage point..


    Not sure where this thread is..

  10. #70
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    That ^ is 456 West 19th.

    It sort of has a thread HERE - albeit a sad and paltry one.

  11. #71
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    High Line Hanger-On HL23 Finally Ready for Lift Off?

    January 28, 2011, by Joey Arak



    The surest sign yet that HL23, architect Neil Denari's condo building over the High Line, is actually nearing completion? The parties have kicked off in the building's empty apartments! A Curbed Photo Pool contributor submitted the above voyeuristic shot, which shows some people having a grand time in the West Chelsea mini-tower (it's the glassy spaceship in the background). Check it out full size. StreetEasy still shows five units in contract after all these years.

    HL23 [Official Site]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...r_lift_off.php

  12. #72

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    Looks like its all interior work thats left.


    My photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/34734039@N04/

  13. #73
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Great exterior. Livable (apart from heat issues)? Questionable. That thing on the floor in the photo below is enough of a turnoff to begin with. Amazing view of the High Line though .


    Nostalgia Wrapped In Steel

    By NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF





    Architecture is a notoriously slow profession. Mastering all the elements that go into designing a building — scale and context, material and form, the structure needed to hold the building up — takes a lifetime. And clients investing millions of dollars in a project tend to feel safer around someone with a little gray around the temples.

    But even given all that, the pace of Neil Denari’s career seems excruciatingly slow. This architect, born in Texas, who founded his firm in 1988, has been a prominent figure in architectural circles since the late 1990s, when he was director of the Southern California Institute of Architecture, an offbeat school that was a center of experimentation. Since then, although he has remained a prominent academic — he is now a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles — he has done only a handful of small additions and renovations. He has never produced a free-standing building.

    So the completion of HL23, a 14-story condominium tower at 10th Avenue and 23rd Street in west Chelsea, is a milestone in the career of one of the country’s most underachieving talents. Encased in a contoured glass-and-steel exterior, the building is as sleek and muscular as an Italian sports car. And it establishes Mr. Denari, at 53, as an architect with something to say about the road American culture has followed from the postwar era to today.

    The conditions for the project were not ideal. The building stands on a relatively small (12,000-square-foot) lot, almost two-thirds of which is tucked beneath the elevated greenway of the adjacent High Line, making it impossible to build on. The rest is wedged between a residential tower on one side and the High Line’s bulky steel frame on the other.

    To pack the maximum square footage into such an awkward space, Mr. Denari designed a building that swells as it rises. Seen from 23rd Street, the building’s bulging glass south facade has an aerodynamic look. Seen from the High Line, the folded steel surface of its eastern side — whose panels were manufactured in Argentina on presses used to make body parts for Mercedes trucks — conjures a hood scoop on a car.

    The building’s odd form creates a wonderfully varied sequence of interior spaces. The lower apartments overlook the High Line’s gardens through floor-to-ceiling windows that resemble enormous windshields. From a south-facing fourth-floor living room, you look straight down the length of the High Line’s concrete walkways and gardens, which veer off to the left before disappearing behind a building several blocks away. (The effect is especially mesmerizing at night, when the High Line is closed to the public and evokes an abandoned road, overgrown with wild flowers; during the day, when it is mobbed with people, the experience is more voyeuristic.)

    The mood changes higher up, where the building expands to accommodate bigger floor plates. Tilted glass walls in a sixth-floor living room allow residents to look straight down into the High Line’s luxurious gardens. A seam in the building’s east facade creates a long vertical window with views north up the elevated park, which from this height looks like a highway.

    The machine aesthetic is everywhere. Steel cross braces cut across the windows. Many of the glass walls are mechanized, sliding open a few inches at the touch of a button.
    The allusions to a mobile culture suggest a version of the American dream straight out of the Eisenhower era. And even the building’s voyeuristic aspects can be read as a form of nostalgia: a Manhattan version of teenage lovers steaming up car windows parked on a cliff side overlooking the bright lights of the city below.

    But like other architects of his generation, especially those who formed many of their ideas working in Los Angeles’s sprawling suburban maze, Mr. Denari is less interested in perpetuating the myth of the open road than in mining it for new ideas. His work has more to do with exploring adolescent fantasies than with celebrating personal freedom. It suggests a longing for a world — free, open, upwardly mobile — that began to break down more than 30 years ago.

    In Chelsea Mr. Denari has created a building that, intentionally or not, is as much about the desire to recapture that vision of America as about the pretty views. Inevitably, it makes you wonder where that dream went wrong.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/26/ar...medium=twitter

  14. #74
    Forum Veteran Tectonic's Avatar
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    06.07.2011


    ©tectonic

  15. #75
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    I'm crazy about this building!

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