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Thread: Endangered NYC - Lost & Threatened Treasures

  1. #166

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    You know, in this age where we are all about correcting our past wrongs and learning from our mistakes with a degree of enlightenment beyond anything the world has ever experienced, it's astounding that we manage to ravish our own city of thousands of buildings to put up utter and complete crap. It's been said, but I'll say it again: this is a depressing thread.

  2. #167
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    It is depressing, but hopefully will help people learn some history, appreciate what still exists and maybe stir some opposition to further losses.

    Manhattan has lost a number of its armories... including this great one:
    71st Regiment Armory (Park at 34th) replaced with 3 Park Ave in 1972:

    Before:


    After

  3. #168

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    F..king sad!

  4. #169
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I hate that building ... the angle , the color, the mass, the glass.

    Everything about it skx.

  5. #170

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    While I like the old armoury I have disdain for buildings in the US that try to look like castles.

  6. #171
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Not really a castle. Fortress-like in the Italianate way. Turrets were for defense -- not for show. 'Twas an armory afterall.

    I love it. Give me a good Campanile anyday. Or a simple Belvedere. They inspired much of the NYC we go ga-ga about here. Much preferred over things squat + boxy.

  7. #172

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    Castle, fortress, they arent an America typology. The defenses on that building are stylistic only, defensive buildings like that went out of functionality with the bow and arrow.

  8. #173
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    NY Harbor is ringed with Fortresses. Without them we'd be tipping our hats to the Queen.

    More on the massive building that was home to the 71st Regiment (with some terrific pics at the link):

    A Sienese Gem Lost

    AndrewCusack.com
    JANUARY 27, 2007

    ... the vista is far removed: it is the corner of Park Avenue and 33rd Street, and the building behind the subway entrance is not the town hall of Siena, but rather the armory of the 71st Regiment, New York National Guard.

    When the earlier Romanesque Revival armory of the Seventy-First Regiment burnt down in 1902, it was decided to build the new armory on the same, though slightly enlarged, site. The 1905 construction was built to the design of the architectural firm of Clinton and Russell, and was clearly inspired by the Palazzo Pubblico (the town hall, photo at right) of Siena, on that city's Piazza de Campo. While the Seventh Regiment Armory contains the finest interiors of any military building in City, and probably the entire Empire State, the exterior of the Seventy-First's armory was far superior. Even though the interior was not to the same lofty standard as the Seventh, it was by no means lacking, for it had all the wood-panelled rooms filled with military regalia from times gone by which one expects of New York's armories from the period ...

    The subway beneath Park Avenue had a station adjacent to the armory on 33rd Street, which was architecturally signified by the faience eagles, made by Heins & Lafarge, which bedecked the station walls. Whenever you see a subway station's street number held on a shield by an eagle, it means that a National Guard armory was once located above, or nearby. The eagles and shields from a closed platform of the Union Square-14th Street station have been reassembled elsewhere in the large station ...

    Despite the grandeur of the armory, the building was still somewhat unloved. Only thirty years after it was erected, Time magazine rather unfairly called it "Manhattan's ugly old brownstone 71st Regiment Armory". It was, of course, a place of history. True to its original purpose, it was not only the home of one of the more prominent regiments of New York's National Guard, but also served as the headquarters of the state's reknowed 27th Division ó "O'Ryan's Roughnecks" ó which included the 71st, the 7th, and other New York regiments. The massive drill hall was not only a functional site for military training but also a prominent civic meeting place. Exhibitions, expositions, labor rallies, fairs, and meetings were held in the hall, which had a capacity of 11,000 people. For example, it was here, in 1964, that the carpetbagging son of a bootlegger named Robert Kennedy won the nomination to the U.S. Senate from the state Democratic caucus. A year later, during the Great Northeastern Blackout, the armory took in 2,500 stranded souls until the lights came back on.

    With it's efficacious design, high standard of construction, and architectural beauty, the 71st Regiment Armory was singled out for destruction by the 'monotony monitors' (as my old Latin teacher used to call them). During the 1960s, they demolished this little corner of Siena on Park Avenue. The site lay fallow for a decade before it was redeveloped with a skyscraper, containing a public high school as part of the developer's deal with the City. To add insult to injury, the Board of Education named the school after the pacifist and socialist Norman Thomas; salt in the wounds of New York's fading military heritage. So if ever you're strolling down Park Avenue in Murray Hill and you come upon an ominous modern skyscraper where socialism and capitalism combine, try to think of better days, and pray they soon return.

    Category: New York Militaria

    POSTED BY Andrew Cusack AT 07:05 PM

  9. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alonzo-ny View Post
    While I like the old armoury I have disdain for buildings in the US that try to look like castles.
    Maybe this will change your mind

  10. #175

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    That made me laugh

  11. #176
    Kings County Loyal BrooklynLove's Avatar
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    LL - where are you getting that avatar?

  12. #177

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    I just downloaded it from the internet.

    Isn't she amazing?

  13. #178
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    ^Dude, I have been meaning to tell you, that avatar is off the hook. Salma is one smoking freaking hot broad! The picture is delectable, thank you for sharing...

    Architecturally , she is a female anatomical treasure....hopefully the baby doesn't threaten it.

  14. #179

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    I'll bet the baby makes her hips and butt even curvier and nicer!

    While it might impact her knockers, they can be enhanced!

  15. #180
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    Washington Life Building 1898-1960s. Cyrus Eidlitz's baroque beauty stood on the site of today's Zuccotti Park (Liberty Plaza). I believe it came down in the 1960s when the area was prepared for the U.S. Steel's black monolith - now 1 Liberty Plaza.


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