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Thread: Endangered NYC - Lost & Threatened Treasures

  1. #436
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Harlem's Renaissance Ballroom Makes Way for Condos



    The state of deterioration at Harlem's Renaissance Ballroom is not news. Now, Harlem Bespoke reports that, despite a stab at landmark status, the main ballroom structure at the back of the one-block complex at Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard and 138th Street has come down. In past lives, the building has been a party hall, basketball gym, and movie theater. Since site owner Abyssinian Baptist Church will be putting up condos on the site, maybe history can inspire the building amenities?

    · Revive: Renaissance Main Ballroom Demolished [Harlem Bespoke]
    · Inside Harlem's Crumbling Renaissance Ballroom [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/1...for_condos.php

  2. #437

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    That sucks.

  3. #438
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Any additions to this beautiful little building would look ridiculous and totally spoil it, IMO.


    East Village Rabbi: Let My People Go...Build Condos

    Friday, November 12, 2010, by Joey Arak


    http://www.panoramio.com/photo/16105000

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_r1dFyemAxm...illage+113.JPG
    (large image)

    Interesting article NYT City Room, 2008

    The tiny Anshei Meseritz synagogue at 415 East Sixth Street is celebrating its 100th anniversary, but times are getting tough. The historic building is in bad shape and the congregation has dwindled to the point of not being able to attract minyan—the minimum of 10 men required by Jewish law—for some services. But the synagogue's rabbi is fighting on, and his hope for the synagogue's future is tied to plans to add condos on top of the building so that the congregation can raise enough cash to upgrade its facilities. These plans have surfaced in the past, but the credit crunch derailed them and now preservationists want the building to be left untouched. Like at the Upper West Side's West-Park Church, the topic of landmarking houses of worship with dwindling memberships is a touchy one. Rabbi Pesach Ackerman, 81, tells The Villager his side of the story:
    “I don’t want landmark status — and neither does my board or most of my congregation,” he asserted. “We don’t want to turn this into some kind of lifeless museum. We want it to be a living and active synagogue — a holy place — and that means growth and making some changes. “If it doesn’t grow, then you won’t have people praying here anymore,” he added. “It’ll die out and all you’ll have is tour buses pulling up to the front door looking at the architecture. I want to attract more neighborhood people who are interested in Judaism and prayer — not tourists,” he said. “That’s what’s most important and that’s what — God willing — is going to happen here. Landmark status would tie our hands.”
    The current idea is to add two floors on top of the building. Kosher?

    Historic synagogue needs condo units on top, rabbi says [The Villager]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/1...ondos.php#more


    Last edited by Merry; November 12th, 2010 at 09:39 PM.

  4. #439
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Yes, a waste .


    Mourning the Old Flatbush Terminal



    Doesn't this photo of the old Flatbush Avenue Terminal just make you want to cry? Kevin Walsh of Forgotten NY brought this photo (and the others on this website) to our attention. (That's One Hanson aka the Williamsburgh Savings Bank in the background.) The passenger station opened in 1907 and was completely refurbished in the 1940s; like many historic structures in Brooklyn, the terminal was allowed to deteriorate in the 1960s and 1970s and the Transit Authority tore it down in the mid-1980s. What a waste.

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...ing_the_ol.php



    http://www.arrts-arrchives.com/FAT1Rext.html

  5. #440
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    Permits Issued to Developer

    By SPENCER MAGLOFF


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/53796984@N05/5189320747/

    On the same day that two preservation groups held a news conference urging the Landmarks Preservation Commission to reconsider refusing to designate a pair of 170-year old buildings at 326 and 328 East Fourth Street as historic landmarks, the Department of Buildings awarded permits for both buildings to developer Terrence Lowenberg.

    “This is truly outrageous,” said Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, who learned from The Local that the permits had been issued.

    “It’s tragic that the Landmarks Preservation Commission sat on their hands for more than three months and allowed this to happen,” said Mr. Berman, whose group led the landmark designation effort. “A wonderful piece of the city’s history will likely be destroyed due to the city’s inaction.”

    The permits, which were filed by Ramy Issac of Issac and Stern Architects in August, were approved Tuesday, according to Ryan Fitzgibbon, a spokeswoman for the Department of Buildings. The estimated total costs in renovations is $568,900 for each building, and include adding two floors to the current three-story structures, altering the number of dwelling units and its occupancy or use.

    Neither Mr. Lowenberg nor Mr. Issac responded to messages by phone or e-mail seeking comment.

    Built before the Civil War, the Greek Revivalist row houses are among the oldest buildings in the East Village. Today their stoops and areaways, cornices and architectural details have remained surprisingly intact, and their long and storied histories serve as a vestige of a bygone era, a memento of an older time. Inside the row houses are in desperate need of repair. Wild cats roam their abandoned corridors, rustic walls are punctured with holes, appliances are smeared with rust, and water leaks from a roof held up with little more than black plastic sheeting.

    The buildings have a checkered history. They were originally built for shipping merchants who were based near what was then the East River docks. Following a great wave of Jewish immigration at turn of the 19th century, one of the buildings then became a Hasidic Synagogue home to Congregation Hesed LeAvraham for nearly 50 years until 1970.

    “When 2.5 million Jews emigrated here from Europe, 500,000 settled here,” said Laurie Tobias Cohen, executive director of the Lower East Side Jewish Conservatory.

    Today, the deserted houses are littered with temple ornaments, bohemian art, and handmade instruments, all remnants of the buildings most recent tenants, the Uranian Phalanstery. The group, which describes itself as an “anarchist utopian commune for practitioners of art and cosmology,” sold off the two properties when faced with tax liens, and moved its headquarters to Hamilton Heights in Upper Manhattan.

    Mr. Berman’s group and East Village Community Coalition have been at the forefront of a back-and-forth battle to save the buildings since August, when the two preservation groups applied for landmark status. However, their request was denied.

    “After carefully reviewing the proposals we found that both buildings have suffered the loss and replacement of some significant features, and are in too poor a physical condition to rise to the level of individual landmarks,” the chairman of the landmarks commission, Robert B. Tierney, said in August.

    http://eastvillage.thelocal.nytimes....per/#more-6395

  6. #441
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Looking at the Issac & Stern website and seeing what might come could make one sick over the loss of these two.

  7. #442

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    Kandahar-on-Hudson sucks.

  8. #443
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    Tumbled Marble

    THE Aug. 8 article and video about “The Mystery of the Lost City” reported that a long-abandoned litter of old marble columns in the woods near the Delbarton School in Morristown, N.J., had been discovered to be from the demolished half of Colonnade Row in TriBeCa.

    In a rush of correspondence, one writer stated that the “missing columns” from Colonnade Row were actually in Ringwood Manor, N.J., and demanded a correction. The Ringwood columns are indeed handsome, but they are not from the 1833 Colonnade Row, the surviving stretch of which is on Lafayette Street just south of Astor Place. Another correspondent, David Lee Smith, pleaded, “Please let us know that they are not going into a landfill.”

    Mr. Smith, our patience will be required, because several dozen tons of marble do not have obvious reuse value. Some of the pieces, especially the capitals, have severely deteriorated, even in the view of someone like me, whose taste runs toward ruination. And if the idea is to reconstruct some of the Colonnade Row facades, too many pieces are missing. Luther Kountze, who rescued the marble early in the 20th century, did not save all the elements of the facade.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired four elements: base, bottom drum, top drum and capital. Morrison Heckscher, the Lawrence A. Fleischman chairman of the museum’s American Wing, says these will be re-erected there sometime in the coming year, in the manner of the fourth-century B.C. marble column from the Temple of Artemis at Sardis in the Greek and Roman Galleries: the upper part resting on the lower, separated by a blank section.
    Brother Paul Diveny, the headmaster of Delbarton, says that the school has been contacted by a few individuals and architectural salvage firms, but won’t take action until it decides what it wants to keep for itself.
    So the Lost City, having been uprooted from the woods, is still taking up space in a parking lot at Delbarton. In the meantime Mr. Heckscher is quite pleased with the new acquisition. He says there is “a bravura in the design and execution which is remarkable, and since the mud and moss were washed off, they’re a very light sandy color contrasting with the glistening quartz.” CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/26/re...l?pagewanted=2

  9. #444

    Default The Urban Eye

    The slowly vanishing "real" NYC, slowly being replaced (and bound by) chains. The video is circa 1990's




  10. #445
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    Interesting find. Seemed older than 1995. Shame about that idiot interviewer.

    Will that kind of nostalgia will still be around when (if?) it's the chainstores' turn to be replaced? Not the same at all.

    Thank goodness for recorded memories, films and photos.

  11. #446
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    Apartment Houses: The Early Story

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/02/re...1&ref=nyregion
    Last edited by Edward; February 15th, 2012 at 05:56 PM. Reason: Full text by Christopher Gray deleted

  12. #447

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    I read that in the Times. I've always wanted to see that building restored. I never knew about the beautiful crown, however. It would be nice if it were restored.

  13. #448
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    The addition of the cheap looking stone slabs on the base along Fifth (continuing onto the building next door) do nothing for this building. Restoration to its original glory would be terrific, but I'm not holding my breath.

  14. #449

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    I'm not holding my breath either. Instead, I sadly acknowledge that it will be razed a replaced by a POS designed by one of NY's hack-a-techts.

  15. #450
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    I really hope these aren't actually endangered and that they will eventually be restored to their obvious former glory.

    East 126th Street, between Park and Madison:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    (from Google Street View)

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