Page 32 of 41 FirstFirst ... 22282930313233343536 ... LastLast
Results 466 to 480 of 602

Thread: Endangered NYC - Lost & Threatened Treasures

  1. #466
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Can't find pictures of the building but apparently the Hotel Gladstone was a favorite of artist Joan Miró, who did a doodle on some hotel stationery back on Nov. 21, 1961 ...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	AAA_ripldwig_2714.jpg 
Views:	260 
Size:	33.7 KB 
ID:	12502

  2. #467
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Seems the Gladstone was, for a short time in 1954, home to Marilyn Monroe ...

    Monroe came to New York in 1954 not only for “The Seven Year Itch” but also for a lifestyle change, the theater and an acting class with Lee Strasberg.

    ... She took a suite at the former Gladstone Hotel on East 52nd Street near Lexington Avenue. It was convenient to the photographer Milton H. Greene’s studio at 480 Lexington, first for portrait sittings and later for business meetings when Greene became vice president of the new Marilyn Monroe Productions ...

  3. #468

    Default Thank you .

    I love the hotel stationary. I am a Marilyn Monroe die-hard fan. I am searching for images precisely for that reason. I have an image of her as she exits the hotel, and one of Gloria Vanderbuilt exiting the retaurant. Gloria Swanson, Marlene Dietrich, also had apartments there.

    " Gladstone, a small, stuffy apartment hotel on East 52nd Street, off Park Avenue. On the left as you came in was a tiny crowded bar, legendary as a meeting place for women who loved women but by no means confined to them. You might encounter Marlene Dietrich in a backless gown or the novelist Sybil Bedford. "

    "16 December 1939 New York - Lola Laszlo, 21-year-old Hungarian actress and nightclub singer/dancer, died today in a plunge from a tenth floor window of a suite at the fashionable Gladstone Hotel. "

    I 'll keep checking in. I love this site.

  4. #469
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Back before tweets ^ when folks could have something of a private existence.

  5. #470
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Better than nothing, I guess, but it's way too late.

    I couldn't help posting this pic again. I don't want to even think about what it looks like now.




    East Harlem's landmark Corn Exchange Building slated for redevelopment

    The New York City Economic Development Corporation has begun accepting bids for the redevelopment of East Harlem's Corn Exchange Building, a city landmark. The EDC said it's aiming for a developer to either purchase or take out a ground lease on the building, which sits on 4,500 square feet and is zoned for residential or commercial use.

    The building, which sits on the corner of Park Avenue and 125th Street, was once six stories tall, but deteriorated due to decay and neglect. Early last year, the Department of Buildings ordered that the upper floors be removed due to safety concerns.

    "After years of seeking to regain control of the underutilized Corn Exchange Building, [the EDC] is proud to be taking this important step in the redevelopment of this neighborhood landmark," said Seth Pinsky, president of the EDC. It was not immediately clear how much the purchase of the site or ground lease would cost.

    http://therealdeal.com/newyork/artic...rce=feedburner

  6. #471

  7. #472

    Default

    Wow! Look at that gorgeous building the Corn Exchange. Ever since I found this site I have been looking thru it and searching books in the library and more sites. I have found some awesome images of what NY looked like in the 20's etc. It made me sick to my stomach when I found the book New York then and now: 83 Manhattan sites photographed in the past and in ... By Edward B. Watson, Edmund Vincent Gillon. To see the beautiful stuff that was knocked down for sheer crap, glass buildings, etc.. I mean, it's nuts. I wish I have lived there even in the 50's. But still, there are way many beautiful buildings now. I want to live there for a year, Manhattan. I just love walking around Sutton Place foe example. But it's too Maybe I can just spend a summer there because I got fed up with the snow, especially in New York. You're better off not owning a car there.

    Anyway, I am still searching for my Gladstone image. If you bump into something, I'll keep searching. Thanks.
    Last edited by Net2011; April 2nd, 2011 at 01:14 AM. Reason: to add

  8. #473

    Default

    The MTA plans to sell its Madison Ave. HQ. If any schmuck razes it, I'd like to sodomize him with a rusty crowbar. The Pre-WWII buildings in Midtown should be landmarked before these greedy, rapacious schmucks destroy them. They'd make great residential conversions.

  9. #474
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Fading Landmark Seeks Future

    By LANA BORTOLOT



    With the real-estate market in Harlem on the rebound, the city is hoping a long-abandoned sore spot in the area will become a hot spot for potential developers.
    The Corn Exchange Building—or what's left of the historic structure at East 125th Street and Park Avenue—is up for grabs. Potential buyers have until April 22 to come up with proposals for the prime, but beleaguered, site.

    Built in 1883 as the Mount Morris Bank, the building was the pride of Harlem with its gables and rich terra-cotta ornament. The Romanesque Revival-style building included luxury apartments, and was an emblem of the neighborhood's prosperity.

    But today, after years of damage, much of what made the building special is gone. "You'd be hard-pressed to find someone who remembers it any other way than a monument to faded glory," said Simeon Bankoff, executive director of Historic Districts Council, who has advocated preserving the building.

    Despite its auspicious beginnings, the building has been long troubled. It became the Corn Exchange Bank in 1913, merged with Chemical Bank in 1954 and eventually ceased operations.



    It was acquired by the city in 1972 and designated a city landmark in 1993, but the building has languished. A 1997 fire destroyed the top stories, including the mansard, of what was originally a six-story structure.

    In 2009, the Department of Buildings removed two more floors of the building as an emergency measure after finding the structure was unstable. Matthew Washington, chairman of Community Board 11, which serves East Harlem, recalls that the demolition work was done without public debate and over preservationists' objections.

    Then in March, the city's Economic Development Corp., which regained title of the building after selling it to a failed nonprofit, asked developers for expressions of interest about what to do with the once-grand building. Community leaders were again surprised by the move.

    "When I found out [the request to developers] was going out, I said, 'Wait a second, we didn't hear anything about this,'" Mr. Washington said.

    This time, he said, the community is determined to weigh in on proposals for the property.
    Spokesman Kyle Sklerov of the Economic Development Corp. said the request is the first review "just to see what people come up with for ideas" and that "moving forward, we will be getting feedback from the community." The selected plan is subject for review by the city's Landmarks Preservation Commission.

    Advocates of the building see a variety of possibilities for the 4,500-square-foot property, including cultural, residential or retail uses. Mr. Washington said he'd like to see a youth-oriented facility there—such as a basketball court or an indoor pool.

    Garry Anthony Johnson, who formerly served on the community board's economic development committee, imagines a boutique hotel created inside the structure, in much the way the New York Palace Hotel was incorporated into the landmarked Villard Houses on Madison Avenue. The remains of the bank building are structurally sound, said Mr. Johnson.

    Community leaders know what they don't want: more glass towers or big box stores. Marina Ortiz, founder of East Harlem Preservation Inc., said she would like to see development that gives the community control.

    "We don't want to go through the motions and be told, 'We know better than you,'" she said. "I'd like to see something that captures some of Ethel Bates's vision—a locally owned and operated institution that supports the community and provides jobs at more than living wages."

    Ethel Bates is the community activist who acquired the Corn Exchange in 2003 with a plan for a nonprofit culinary school at the site. When Ms. Bates lost backing for the projected $9 million restoration, the building, quite literally, fell to pieces.

    A series of lawsuits filed by the city and a bankruptcy filing by Ms. Bates halted her plans. She has filed an appeal to the state Supreme Court's decision that returned the property to Economic Development Corp.

    Ms. Bates said she was unable to comment while the appeal was under way.
    Mr. Johnson is keeping a close watch on the site, literally: His architectural office sits directly across the street from the building. Mr. Johnson was a critic of the 2009 partial demolition and worries about the site's future.

    "I'm not antidevelopment," he said. "I'm pro-development that's controlled and respectful."

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...NewsCollection

  10. #475

    Default

    Again, from Harlem+Bespoke:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1360.jpg 
Views:	241 
Size:	95.8 KB 
ID:	12726

    The great Harlem documentarian Camilo Jose Vergara probably took the last photo of the Corn Exchange Building before it started to substantially deteriorate. The former Mount Morris Bank building that sits by the Metro North Station at Park Avenue was almost completely demolished early this year because of neglect by its owner and only the base remains today. A fire started by squatters destroyed the roof in 1997 and most of the East Harlem structure had been covered by scaffolding in the past 5 years so many newcomers to Harlem might not even remember what it looked like previously. See our past post on the Corn Exchange building for the full history on the efforts to preserve this NYC landmark and more photos of the building then and now: LINK

    Looks like the roof had been remodeled and stripped down at some time in the past.

  11. #476
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Embattled Corn Exchange Developer Will Fight for Harlem Landmark

    Ethel Bates, 80, says developing a culinary school on the historic site is her priority.

    By Jeff Mays








    (photos: Harlem Bespoke)

    HARLEM — The woman originally given control of the landmarked Corn Exchange Building in East Harlem says she still hopes to win the building back from the city and build a culinary school.Ethel Bates, 80, lost control of the building to the city's Economic Development Corporation in 2009 after she was unable to develop the $9 million nonprofit culinary institute that she proposed when awarded title to the building in 2003. Bates has appealed the New York State Supreme Court decision, but the city issued a request for expressions of interest last month.

    "We are not going to give it up," Bates told members of Community Board 11 Monday. "The culinary institute is something we need in this community."

    Bates, who has no previous development experience, was unable to find a developer to partner with on the project. She says she has spent more than $300,000 of her own money trying to redevelop the project. Nevertheless, the building fell into further disrepair.

    In 2009 — to the dismay of historic preservationists — the top floors of the structure were dismantled after being deemed a safety hazard by the Department of Buildings. The building is now a two-story nub.

    Bates says she is currently in negotiations with three developers regarding projects at the building, including a possible hotel. Any project would include two floors of deeded and dedicated space for the culinary institute. She also questioned why the city would issue a request for expressions of interest while still referring potential developers to her.
    "I haven't backed off," Bates said. "If I believe in something I'm going to back it. I want to see that school developed no matter what goes down."

    But the EDC has said they were forced to take back title to the building as a last resort after Bates' development plans failed to materialize. Liens incurred while Bates controlled the building have placed it in jeopardy of foreclosure and the dangerous conditions are proof of why legal action was required to regain control of the building.

    The building, which sits on a 4,300-square-foot lot and is zoned for both commercial and residential uses, is being offered as-is, meaning any new developer would have to deal with the liens.

    The EDC acknowledged it was still trying to work with Bates in the interest of getting the project developed but said they expected to win the appeal and the requests for expression of interest were part of the process of moving forward as quickly as possible.

    "Unfortunately for the residents of East Harlem, the Corn Exchange Building, under its previous owner, sat undeveloped for years. Our goal is to activate and preserve this historic building as soon as possible, which will create jobs, promote economic development in the area, and bring amenities to the community," said Kyle Sklerov, a spokesperson for the EDC.

    The building was designed by architects Lamb & Rich in the Queen Anne and Romanesque Revival styles. It was originally constructed for the Mount Morris Bank, which was absorbed by the Corn Exchange Bank in 1913. The building then fell into the hands of the city due to tax foreclosure in the late 1970s.

    Members of the Historic Districts Council have described the building, located at Park Avenue and East 125th Street in the shadow of the Metro North rail line, as one of the best examples of architecture along 125th Street.

    "If EDC wanted to do the right thing they could have said we will give you back the deed and help you develop the building," said Bates.

    Community Board 11 member LaShawn Henry, who heads the board’s City Properties and Land Use Committee, questioned the development process of city agencies.

    "Our agencies should do a better job looking at at the viability of these developers. If there was a better process upfront, the Ethel Bates' of the world would not lose so much money on the back end," said Henry. "It's really important we find viable developers to take our available land and do something for our community."

    The goal now, said Henry, was to make sure a valuable property such as the Corn Exchange Building was developed quickly.

    "If we don't make sure someone responsible gets this property it could sit there undeveloped for another 25 years," Henry said.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20110412/harl...#ixzz1JUjOMBKN

  12. #477

    Default The Gladstone Hotel news articles

    I found some articles on the Gladstone, with one poor image. Still searching for actual images.

  13. #478
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Perhaps this now belongs in the Demolished/Destroyed thread, but we still have the two beautiful buildings on either side to be concerned about maybe, since this is not in a historic district.


    REVIVE: 2066 Fifth Avenue Facade Demolished









    A reader sent in current photos of 2066 Fifth just north of 127th Street and it now appears that the top floor additions planned for the building actually means having an entirely new structure designed. Permits that went up over a year ago had revealed that the third and fourth floors would be removed but the site apparently does not have one brick of the original facade remaining at this point. This adaptive reuse project that would have restored the last building in a row of distinct townhouses has now suddenly turned into a new construction.

    http://harlembespoke.blogspot.com/20...ue-facade.html

  14. #479
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    I suppose almost anything is better than looking at the current heartbreakingly pathetic sight.

    Developer Plans Comeback for Harlem's Landmark Corn Exchange


    July 13, 2011, by Sara Polsky



    The Corn Exchange (above) at Park Avenue and East 125th Street was "hardly more than a flutter on a hospital monitor" last spring, but a few months ago, the city brought out the defibrillator and started taking bids for the building's purchase or lease. A developer, the not very revealingly named 125th Equities LLC, has now been selected, according to a press release from the city. The developer plans to "rehabilitate the historic base of the building and reconstruct an additional six floors to restore the building in a manner that is consistent with its landmark status." The redeveloped building will end up being about 31,000 square feet—22,000 square feet of offices and 9,000 of retail. The developer promises to bring any changes before the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

    The Corn Exchange Building isn't the only Harlem spot facing some major changes in the near future. The city has also chosen developers Janus Partners LLC and Monadnock Construction to redevelop the former Taystee Bakery complex into something called CREATE @ Harlem Green, which will have commercial and industrial space for "tenants from creative industries" and "ground floor uses that activate the streetscape." We're not totally sure what that means, but since what's there now doesn't do much to activate the streetscape, we give this a tentative thumbs-up.

    UPDATE: The city passed along a rendering of the plan for the former Taystee Bakery complex, and it looks like this:



    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...hange.php#more

  15. #480
    Fearless Photog RoldanTTLB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Broomfield, CO
    Posts
    2,910

    Default

    While I, eh, somehow feel for you, and the building is very nice on the outside, if not a little comely, the inside of 347 Madison is just trashed.

Similar Threads

  1. Uncertain Future for the Past's Treasures
    By Kris in forum World Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 15th, 2003, 11:04 PM
  2. Architectural historian fights for Harlem's treasures - Tryi
    By NoyokA in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 9th, 2003, 01:40 PM
  3. Lost in Space - A Soho exhibition of Zaha Hadid’s work
    By Edward in forum World Skyscrapers and Architecture
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 1st, 2003, 01:35 AM
  4. Where Blue Collars Grow Endangered - Sunset Park
    By Kris in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: June 24th, 2003, 10:48 PM
  5. 3 Buildings From 1830's Threatened By a Tower - Downtown
    By Kris in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: March 29th, 2003, 11:08 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software