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Thread: Endangered NYC - Lost & Threatened Treasures

  1. #541

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    Quote Originally Posted by scumonkey View Post
    At the very least they should have to replace the decorative molding/frame around the door,
    tying it back together with the windows (agreed- the white frames are out of place), more like the original.
    I would hold judgement till they start some finish woodwork. 95% of the interior is being stored for re installment. Perhaps the molding around the door and windows is being similarly stored for the future. The white is just the (PVC?) frame, it could easily be dressed up.

  2. #542
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Oh. My. God.


    Robber Baron's Chelsea Opera House Is Now a Dallas BBQ

    by Jeremiah Budin



    19th century robber baron James "Big Jim" Fisk was known for embarking on insanely risky (and usually very illegal) business ventures, which included the time that he wrested control of the Erie Railroad from Cornelius Vanderbilt (successful) and the time that he tried to buy all the gold in New York City (disastrous, but not for him). Perhaps the thing that he is most known for, however, is being murdered by an associate after becoming entangled in a love triangle where the third side of the triangle was a prostitute. He was not well liked. The day after his murder, the New York Times wrote that "No sympathy ... was possible," going on to describe the events leading up to the shooting as "a mere loathsome exhibition of depravity and cupidity such as, thank Heaven, does not often bring a blush to pure maiden faces or cause the ears of pruriency to tingle with its filthy recitals." It seems strangely appropriate then, in some vague way, that the enormous marble opera house that Fisk owned, lived in, and worked out of has since been replaced by a Dallas BBQ.


    [via The Bowery Boys]

    Fisk's Grand Opera House, originally called Pike's Opera House, was built in 1868 by distiller and entrepreneur Samuel Pike at 23rd Street and Eighth Avenue. The cost of construction for the five-story marble structure, which was adorned on the outside with statues of Comedy and Tragedy and seated 1,800, was one million dollars, a very hefty sum for the mid 19th century. The theater, though impressive, failed to draw patrons away from the more popular Academy of Music on 14th Street, and Pike was forced to close it after only one year in business.



    The buyers that Pike found to take the enormous theater off his hands were "Big Jim" Fisk and his business partner (not the one who shot him) Jay Gould, fresh off their successful attempt to steal the Erie Railroad from under Cornelius Vanderbilt's nose. The two Tammany Hall-backed robber barons paid another million to renovate the one-year-old building and added offices (where Fisk would later barricade himself after the attempt to corner the gold market blew up and resulted in all his investors going broke) and an apartment for Fisk on the upper floors. Fisk also added a secret passageway to the back of the building from the adjacent apartment building in which he housed his prostitute mistress, Josie Mansfield. Mansfield was frequently given parts in productions at the theater, which became decidedly less classy under the stewardship of Fisk and Gould, first including operettas and later popular stage plays of the time such as "Uncle Tom's Cabin" (performed by white actors in blackface).

    Following the scandal that erupted when Edward Stokes and Mansfield attempted to extort Fisk by using his shady business dealings against him, culminating in Fisk's 1872 murder at the hands of Stokes, the theater remained in Gould's possession. Never profitable before, it became even less so during this period and Gould was eventually reduced to renting it out to vaudeville acts. In 1938, it followed the trend of many theaters at the time and was converted to a movie house by RKO Theatres, who hired architect Thomas Lamb for the remodeling. Lamb stripped off much of the ornamentation and added retail shops and marquee.


    [via Daytonian in Manhattan]

    The movie theater stayed open until 1960, when it was closed and, two weeks later, ravaged by a fire. It was demolished and what stands in its place now is a three-story office building with a Dallas BBQ and a Chicken Delight on the ground floor. "The recent acts of Fisk require no extended mention," the obituary of the site's former proprietor reads. "In fact, the less said the better." Unfortunately, the same is true of the grand marble building he once called home.

    From Silk Purse to Sow's Ear -- 23rd Street and 8th Avenue [Daytonian]
    Chelsea's old Opera House: from robber barons to BBQ [Bowery Boys]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...dallas_bbq.php

  3. #543
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    That's gotta be a valuable corner.

  4. #544
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Corn Exchange Construction to Begin








    New plywood has gone up along with a wall of fresh permits at East Harlem's landmark Corn Exchange Building site and construction should begin this month. A poster of the final design has been placed out on the construction site located on 125th Street by Park Avenue and everything appears ready to go based on the paperwork. The most informative DOB document on display was approved just 5 days ago and has the approval confirmed for a gut rehab of the existing 7 story building which includes the building of floors. This former bank is probably East 125th's grandest structure but was partially demolished since the previous owner failed to maintain the building and develop it based on government timelines. According to the previously mentioned document, the building could possibly be completed within 6 months since the permit expires on January 1, 2014.

    Since the Corn Exchange Building is an official New York Landmark, the architectural gem will be reconstructed to its original glory thanks to the architects of Danois who have done this sort of restoration in the past. Check out our previous post to see what the final building plan will look like: LINK

    http://harlembespoke.blogspot.com.au...ction-set.html

  5. #545

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    That's the only place they posted the rendering? I hope they went with the full restoration in this rendering:

  6. #546
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    reminds me of the Astral on Franklin St in Greenpoint


  7. #547
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    Default Map of 1800s buildings in Manhattan


  8. #548
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    Quote Originally Posted by 212 View Post
    I like the concept a lot but that's a terrible execution of the map

  9. #549

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    That map is pretty incomplete.

  10. #550

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    Right...even the building I live in is well over 100 years old and is not listed?!

  11. #551
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    ^ Thanks guys. I saw the map linked from Curbed. Glad there are more 1800s buildings out there after all

  12. #552
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Lots of mistakes on that map, particularly south of 14th Street and especially in the SoHo area.

  13. #553

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    Quote Originally Posted by RandySavage View Post
    Tonightís entries are three classic hotels. The first two were stripped down to their steel in the 1980s and rebuilt for the worse. The 3rd still stands.

    The Commodore Hotel; 1920-1980; Hyatt Hotels;

    Past:


    Present:

    Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/markvanraai/


    The Biltmore Hotel(335 Madison Ave.); 1913-1983; Paul Milstein;
    Past:


    Present:



    The Taft(Manger) Hotel; 1920-Today; Summit Hotels; lives on and operates as the Michaelangelo. Hooray!
    Past:


    Present:
    What needs to be realized with the Commodore/Grand Hyatt is by 1975 when that hotel was to become the Grand Hyatt, the Commodore was badly deteriorated and likely would have been torn down otherwise. This was at a time no one wanted to build in NYC, and few today would realize how big of a risk Donald Trump took in taking on the rebuild (this was his very first project in Manhattan). This was one of the first signs the worst would pass for NYC, especially following then-President Ford's "drop dead" speech that October.

  14. #554

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    ^ Maybe just my computer but can't see the present picture of the Biltmore or the past pic of The Taft.

  15. #555
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I'm getting the little blue box for those, too.

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