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Thread: Endangered NYC - Lost & Threatened Treasures

  1. #556

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    If the rezoning occurs and is not blocked by our left-wing, Sandinista-loving future mayor, I hope that the Grand Hyatt is razed. In reality, however, Bill "Karl Marx" DeBlasio and David "Friedrich Engels" Garodnick probably will dramatically curtail rezoning, and this POS will remain, while the Roosevelt and MTA HQ are razed and replaced with lame glass boxes.

  2. #557

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    Yeah, that was a very old post in this thread I was quoting from. Some of those pics were allowed to lapse and/or the flickr account they were associated with has since been closed.

  3. #558
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post

    ... our left-wing, Sandinista-loving future mayor ... Bill "Karl Marx" DeBlasio and David "Friedrich Engels" Garodnick ...
    As opposed to the Constitutionally challenged, CONTRA loving, Secretly-Sell-Arms-to-Iran proponent Joe "Ollie North" Lohta?

  4. #559

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    Exactly.

  5. #560
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Oh, no, not another one!


    Bronx Landmark, Under City’s Care, Is on Brink of Demolition

    By DAVID W. DUNLAP


    An abandoned public school building on the Grand Concourse in the South Bronx that is owned by the city
    has deteriorated so badly that it may need to be torn down.
    Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times


    The Landmarks Preservation Commission had strong words for the owner of an abandoned landmark in the South Bronx — the elegant and imposing “Castle on the Concourse” — which is so dangerously deteriorated that emergency demolition may be the only resort.

    “It’s been a disgraceful stewardship,” Elizabeth Ryan, a commission member, said at a public hearing on Dec. 17.

    A fellow commissioner, Michael Devonshire, seconded the sentiment. “I find it completely despicable,” he said.

    As remarkable as their anger was the identity of the landlord: New York City.

    The building in question is the former Public School 31, 425 Grand Concourse, at East 144th Street. It was completed in 1899, designated a landmark in 1986 and closed in 1997 when there were early signs of the structural deterioration that now seems poised to engulf the five-story structure — if it isn’t razed first.

    The hearing concerned an application from the Department of Citywide Services, which has had charge of the building for two years, to demolish it.


    Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

    “It is absolutely a hazard to the public,” Timothy D. Lynch, an assistant commissioner in the Department of Buildings and a professional engineer, said at the hearing. “It is ripe for an event, a large event.”

    Seen from the north, the school still looks like something its architect, C. B. J. Snyder, would have little trouble recognizing. Designed in a style known as Collegiate Gothic, from its origins at Oxford, Cambridge and Eton, the school is bisected by a central tower with octagonal turrets on each corner. The cream-colored brick facade is enlivened by whimsical, grotesque carved heads, not just the customary lions and eagles, but what appear to be wide-eyed walruses.

    From the south, however, it looks as if a bomb had taken out the two-story projecting bay, known as an oriel, that used to rise over the girls’ entrance. That end of the building is no longer supported on its own cast-iron and wrought-iron framework, Mr. Lynch said, but on 17-year-old timber shoring and bracing.

    “It’s distressing,” Robert B. Tierney, the commission chairman, said at the hearing. “I do not see a solution.”

    “I feared that this day might come,” he added. “And it’s come.”

    As a landlord, the city is treated differently by the landmarks law than a private owner, who must obtain approval from the commission before altering or demolishing an individual landmark, or a building within a historic district.

    By contrast, a city agency receives only a nonbinding advisory report from the commission, which it may embrace, consider or disregard as it chooses.

    In its advisory report on P.S. 31, the commission said that “if possible, one last effort should be expeditiously made to adaptively reuse the building.”

    However, nothing in the officials’ testimony suggested they were of a mind to explore an 11th-hour rescue. Mr. Lynch said he would have moved to demolish the building in January 2013, after Hurricane Sandy dislodged part of a parapet wall, sending it flying over a sidewalk shed and into a nearby playground.

    That was when the Department of Housing Preservation and Development entertained a reconstruction proposal by the South Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation, said Ted Weinstein, the director of Bronx planning at the housing agency. He said there was “a high level of interest” in the plan.

    Ultimately, however, his colleagues decided that it was not feasible. “As much as people wanted to do it,” Mr. Weinstein said, “the conclusion was that it just really was not in the public interest, it doesn’t make sense to do this.”

    Nearly 750 people signed an online petition started by Ed García Conde, founder and editor of the blog Welcome2TheBronx, calling on the city to spare the building.

    There seems to be little hope of that. The housing agency expects to have a demolition contractor by the end of January, though wrecking cannot begin until asbestos has been removed, which is likely to take several months.

    “We sit as part of a system that has failed this building and has failed this community,” Michael Goldblum, a landmarks commission member, said at the hearing. “And that’s an awful feeling.”

    Alejandro Rodriguez, who lives near P.S. 31 and can remember when it was still in use, would probably have agreed with Mr. Goldblum. “They should have protected it long ago,” he said. “This building is a landmark. It has a story.”

    Roberta Brandes Gratz, an author on urban affairs and a former member of the landmarks commission, took a longer — but no happier — view.

    “What a sour note to end the Bloomberg administration landmarks legacy,” she wrote on Facebook. “The city is a terrible steward of its landmarks and frequently lets them deteriorate ’til they can make this excuse, even though alternative engineers show rescue and reuse possible. Watch a developer scoop this up.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/09/ny...=nyregion&_r=0

  6. #561

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    What a Shame.

  7. #562
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Watch a developer scoop this up.
    And watch a cheap Fedders go in its place.

  8. #563

  9. #564
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    The Corn Exchange Building Tops Off



    Almost 25 years after a fire destroyed the roof of the Corn Exchange Building at 125th Street, the Harlem landmark by Park Avenue has finally acquired a new ceiling. Back in 1987, squatters at the abandoned city-owned building nearly burned the entire structure down but everything held up except the roof.

    By 1993, the iconic 125th Street building would be declared an official city landmark but the local government still did not do much to restore the building.

    The empty Corn Exchange would then be sold to a local community activist by 2003 who was not able to do much until the structure became more unstable six years later. By then the top 4 floors had to be demolished. This was a critical juncture point since demolition by neglect is a strong reason for the city to sue a property owner and return a building to the government. A new developer now in charge of the building and will be replicating the lost floors in the coming months. Check out the final sketches in our past post: LINK

    http://harlembespoke.blogspot.com.au...-tops-off.html

  10. #565

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    Many of the building's elements return. A heavily modified (nearly straight) Mansard roof but a Mansard roof nonetheless, the bay windows, and hopefully, some good stone masonry, to match the materials used at the base.

  11. #566

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    I kind of miss the "bowls" beneath the bay windows. I wonder if they saved any of the old copper.

  12. #567
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  13. #568
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    Default The Noble Houses - Central Park West 84th to 85th Street - 1894




    https://archive.org/stream/sheppsnew.../n129/mode/2up


    http://daytoninmanhattan.blogspot.co...-house-no.html

    Sparked by the construction of the Dakota Apartment building in 1884, Central Park West was seeing rapid development when speculative builder William Noble purchased the land between 84th and 85th Street. Noble was a major player in late 19th Century New York real estate, responsible for scores of new buildings. The Real Estate Record and Builder’s Guide said of him “…there is one builder whose name looms up as one of the particularly bright stars of the coterie of men who have done so much to improve and enrich our city.”

    Working with architect Edward J. Agnell, Noble erected a row of nine townhouses on the site in 1887, called The Noble Houses. The upper-class residences were in the latest Queen Anne style, each different from the next, yet forming a unified and cohesive grouping. Among them, Noble chose No. 247 as his own home.

    The buff brick and limestone mansion rose four stories over an English basement and, like the others in the row, had all the bells and whistles desired by well-to-do homeowners of the period – stained glass, carved stone, projecting bays, gables, dormers and eccentric angles and contrasting colors and lines.

    Survivors 247-248-249 Central Park West



    (image – Google “Street View” Maps)

  14. #569

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    ^Very nice.

  15. #570
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    ^^ Superb.


    Grrrrrrrr .


    Demolition Planned for Downtown Brooklyn Apartment Building

    by Rebecca



    The wrecking ball is coming for this attractive circa-1900 walkup at 88 Schermerhorn Street in Downtown Brooklyn, which sold for $11,000,000 last month and will be replaced by condos. The new owner, Second Development Services, filed a demolition application for the four-story, eight-unit building last Friday.

    A deed dated October 1 lists Second Development as the buyer. The site’s zoning allows a building as large as 33,330 square feet, which works out to a sale price of $330 per buildable square foot, a record for the area, according to GlobeSt.com, which covered the sale.

    SDS told the publication they’re going to build a 20-story condo on the lot between Boerum Place and Court Street. The developer is also working on the 29-story Vos Hotel at 95 Rockwell Place.

    http://www.brownstoner.com/blog/2014...ment-building/

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