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Thread: Good Smell Perplexes New Yorkers

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    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Default Good Smell Perplexes New Yorkers

    Good Smell Perplexes New Yorkers

    By KAREEM FAHIM
    Published: October 28, 2005

    An unseen, sweet-smelling cloud drifted through parts of Manhattan last night. Arturo Padilla walked through it and declared that it was awesome.

    "It's like maple syrup. With Eggos. Or pancakes," he said. "It's pleasant."

    The odor had followed Mr. Padilla and his friend along their walk in Lower Manhattan, from a dormitory on Fulton Street, to Pace University on Spruce Street, and back down again, to where they stood now, near a Dunkin' Donuts. Maybe it was from there, he said. But it wasn't.

    Mr. Padilla was not alone. Reports of the syrupy cloud poured in from across Manhattan after 9 p.m. Some feared that it was something sinister.

    There were so many calls that the city's Office of Emergency Management coordinated efforts with the Police and Fire Departments, the Coast Guard and the City Department of Environmental Protection to look into it.

    By 11 p. m., the search had turned up nothing harmful, according to tests of the air. Reports continued to come in from as far north as 112th Street shortly before midnight. In Lower Manhattan, where the smell had begun to fade, it was back, stronger than before, by 1 a.m.

    "We are continuing to sample the air throughout the affected area to make sure there's nothing hazardous," said Jarrod Bernstein, an emergency management spokesman. "What the actual cause of the smell is, we really don't know."

    There were conflicting accounts as to its nature. A police officer who had thrown out her French vanilla coffee earlier compared it to that. Two diplomats from the Netherlands disagreed, politely. Rieneke Buisman said it smelled like roasted peanuts. Her friend Joris Geeven said it reminded him of a Dutch cake called peperkoek, though he could not describe that smell.

    Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

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    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    I smelled that last night at the park at 52nd and 11th..... Weird.

    I also caught a few wiffs of it in Hoboken.

    I thought maybe a sugar storage place caught fire or something. Like caremelized sugar.


    I always worry when I smell something that does not fit. Make me think there is something wrong with the wiring upstairs (I believe stroke victims sometimes hear/see/smell things when they are having one).

    Maybe we all just had simultaneus strokes.


    Or the government just sucessfully tested their Maple Syrup Brain ray.

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    I was out and about downtown last night with my friend, and we both noticed the smell around NYU. It did smell like pancakes. It was so weird, but certainly not unwelcome.

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    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    I smelled it when I was taking my garbage out - assumed it came from the bakery next door.

    In my wildest dreams I didn't think it would make the papers, and didn't even put two and two together until I was halfway through the article, but it's one of the more hilarious headlines.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYatKNIGHT
    , but it's one of the more hilarious headlines.
    In fact, when I first read the article you posted, I thought it was from The Onion

  6. #6

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    If you live down in Mahattan Island, you are gonna smell lotsa different things like that!

    The sidewalks of NYC smell of ??????

    The Subways smell of Urine.

    The buses smell of diesel.

    All the people who live over here don't even wanna vist Manhattan Island.

    It is too crowded, smelly, noisy, violent and expensive...................

    The tallest old building is Pickwick Apartments with six floors and the tallest new buildings are only 3 stories tall.

    There is very little crime in this neigborhood of 4500 people.

    I am planning on moving to Arizona when I get the money from my talking Mute Swan video!

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    I'm sorry, but whenever he says that, I can't help thinking...


  8. #8

    Default right click

    I did a right-click on the broken image and then used view image and I got the "turtle!"

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    All I have to say is that you should not follow your noses into the sea.

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    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schadenfrau
    All I have to say is that you should not follow your noses into the sea.
    Isn't that a disney flik?

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    Or, do you mean follow Moses through the Red Sea?

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    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Whiff of Maple Syrup Is Back, and New York Smells a Rat

    By ANTHONY RAMIREZ
    NY Times
    December 9, 2005

    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/09/nyregion/09maple.html


    It's back and as maddening as ever, or so some noses supposed.

    In October, people all over New York City reported the sweet smell of syrup, like something out of a Vermont diner, only bigger and spreading. "It's like maple syrup, with Eggos, or pancakes," Arturo Padilla said then. "It's pleasant."

    Others said it was caramel, or a freshly baked pie, or Bit-O-Honey candy bars. Still, sweetness seemed sinister to some. Cyanide, you know, smells like almonds.

    Yesterday, the city Office of Emergency Management got wind of the return of the mystery smell. And, as it did in October, it investigated.

    The emergency management office has the job of responding to crises, like killer weather or terrorist attacks. Police, fire and environmental protection investigators were sent out with sniffing machines nicknamed "electronic canaries."

    Real canaries, sensitive to toxic gases, once served as an early warning system for coal miners. Unlike the mystery smell, however, the mine gases were odorless.

    Yesterday, just as in October, the mystery smell proved elusive.

    "We have no indication that there's anything hazardous," said Jarrod Bernstein, a spokesman for the emergency management office. "Understand it is a lot easier to test if something is not hazardous than it is to figure out exactly what it is."

    Most of the reports, Mr. Bernstein said, were from above 96th Street in Manhattan, although scattered reports came from Midtown.

    This reporter took his nose for a stroll on 42nd Street between 11th Avenue and Lexington Avenue. Nose in the air, he detected nothing except for a rotten-egg smell midblock at Madison Avenue.

    But the Gothamist blog at www.gothamist.com reported a huge maple swath from Greenwich Village to Columbia University. Jen Chung, co-founder of Gothamist, invited readers to add their findings to a Web map she created.

    And did Ms. Chung herself smell the pancakes? Alas, no.

    "I have a cold," she said.



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    Near my office there is a canoli shell bakery. Some days it smells really lovely, it could be as simple as that.

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    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Or it could be that there are agencies testing the dispersion and airborne carrying properties of teh streets of manhattan.

    What better way to do it than to make a distinctive, yet unsuspicious aroma waft through the city?

  15. #15

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    New York Newsday
    March 17th 2004 - Ray Sanchez

    "In 1976, the Army admitted to Congress that 10 years earlier, its bacteriological warfare unit had dropped a light bulb containing pathogenic bacteria in the subway. The purpose was to "monitor the spread of the agent through the tunnels." The Army's biological test on New York in 1966 turned into an attack when throughout the subway along Broadway, more than a million people were exposed to bacillus subtilis variant Niger."


    About the sweet smell: Isn´t this phenomena being taken a little too lightly by the press etc? Just some funny curiosity?

    C´mon, suddenly out of nowhere...a never before reported phenomena....MILES of Manhattan start to take on a sweet smell. Yeah, maybe it´s a neighborhood bakery?

    I´m not into conspiracy theories, but people should be demanding some answers here.
    Last edited by Fabrizio; December 9th, 2005 at 06:15 PM.

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