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Thread: 401-403 Greenwich St (TriBeCa) - 1st Ever Glass-Brick bldg - by Joseph Pell Lombardi

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    Tribeca isn't elegant, or even architecturally cohesive; it's a polyglot of style that reflects the way the neighborhood developed. In waves - textile industry, manufacturing, produce. None of the buildings in that photo are spectacular; they are sort of crappy, and they exist throughout the neighborhood. If anything has destroyed the appearance of the area, look across the street to Citicorp.

    Back when it was Washington Market, the neighborhood was full of people, but they were workers, not residents. They sustained a lot of unique establishments. Places like Magoo's, where a starving artist could pay off a bar tab by giving the owner some artwork. Great onion soup. Or Suerkens. These places survived the worker exodus, and found new life among residents. Now that the neighborhood has filled up and they're needed, high rents and a mad rush to develop have forced many to shut down.

    ^ YES!


    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    By contrast, all of the other buildings surrounding the proposed new one are spectacular.
    I would not call that tenement building next to it spectacular... but it and it's wall are just fine too.

    This is not 5th Ave.

    You do not seem to get the fact that some of the rough and tumble is what makes these neighborhoods what they are and created their desirability.


  2. #32

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    Have you been to TriBeCa or the Meat Packing District lately? They're posher than Fifth Avenue.

    I also diagree with your claim that some rubbish adds to a neighborhood's character. Run down eyesores are distinctly absent from Belgravia, South Kensington, etc.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    .... but you seem to be only concerned about how a city looks, and not with how it functions. An ugly city can function, but if a city doesn't function, it doesn't matter what it looks like....

    Tribeca isn't elegant....
    Wrong. I am concerned with how a city looks and how it functions. They are not mutually exclusive of one another. Look at London.

    P.S.: I think that Tribeca is one of the most elegant areas of the city. It has magnificent buildings, great shops and great restaurants. It's a rich man's playground unlike, for example, the UES (east of Lex) which is a haven of rent-regulated dilapidated buildings, rat and roach filled cheap restaurants, etc.

  4. #34
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    Which is where you lived.

  5. #35

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    Yes. And I hated it. We lived there because it was convenient for my wife's job. I wanted to live downtown or on the UWS.

  6. #36
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I hear that there's plenty of room available in Dubai for those who like shiny & new. And it has none of those filthy dilapidated rat + roach + Rent Stabilized Tenant infested buildings.

    Or any street life whatsoever.

  7. #37
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    the UES (east of Lex) which is a haven of rent-regulated dilapidated buildings, rat and roach filled cheap restaurants, etc.
    That is utterly ridiculous.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    They are not mutually exclusive of one another/
    I never implied that the two are mutually exclusive. I said that functionality is not dependent on aesthetics, but aesthetics can't exist without functionality, in which case the city becomes a museum.

    Noting Fabrizio's "This is not 5th Ave:" The problem in Manhattan isn't that some places don't look like 5th Ave; it's that some parts of 5th Ave don't look like 5th Ave.

    P.S.: I think that Tribeca is one of the most elegant areas of the city.
    Please.

  9. #39
    Crabby airline hostess - stache's Avatar
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    It's neverending -

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    I hear that there's plenty of room available in Dubai for those who like shiny & new. And it has none of those filthy dilapidated rat + roach + Rent Stabilized Tenant infested buildings.

    Or any street life whatsoever.
    I am hardly the advocate of shiny and new. I prefer nice and old.

  11. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy View Post
    That is utterly ridiculous.
    Having lived on the UES for many years, this block is very representative of the area. It looks grimy to me.

    Some people like grime. I do not.


  12. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    I never implied that the two are mutually exclusive. I said that functionality is not dependent on aesthetics, but aesthetics can't exist without functionality, in which case the city becomes a museum.

    Noting Fabrizio's "This is not 5th Ave:" The problem in Manhattan isn't that some places don't look like 5th Ave; it's that some parts of 5th Ave don't look like 5th Ave.

    Please.
    You and I have very different perspectives on things. I respect your opinion.

  13. #43

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    I agree with londonlawyer's points though I don't see much wrong with the one story building. Buildings that don't fit perfectly next to each other are part of the uniqueness of our cityscape.


  14. #44

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    I don't mind buildings not fitting in perfectly next to each other. I just thought it was a missed opporunity to redevelop the whole corner and replace the tax payer that houses the restaurant.

    By the way, even with the tax payer that photo shows how beautiful Tribeca is. It's the pristine contrast to a lot of Midtown and the UES.

  15. #45

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    If the building were vacant, it would be another story.

    A better case could be made for 34 Leonard St. Buster's Garage was a cool place (NYLS students meet WU building technicians), but the Provenzano garage was a large site, and a building was needed here.

    And it's not like there's no place left to build. There's still quite a few parking lots in the area.

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