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  1. #61
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Landmarks Commision OKs Death of Upper East Side Porn Palace

    December 9, 2009, by Joey














    Yesterday the Landmarks Preservation Commission approved some big changes to 14-16 East 67th Street, the 48-foot-wide mansion—one of the biggest private homes in the city—combined from two separate townhouses in 1920. In the fourth biggest deal of the decade, filthy rich hedgie Philip Falcone purchased the 27-room home for $49 million in '08. He bought it from the creditors of Bob Guccione, the legendary Penthouse publisher who lived in the mansion for decades before getting forced out. Guccione added all sorts of personal touches to the landmark, like a Roman-inspired indoor pool and, uh, marble columns with his face carved into them. It was, in essence, his Caligula Castle. But to Falcone, the mansion is a $49 million fixer-upper.

    When it was on the market, 14-16 East 67th Street was renamed the Milbank Mansion to separate it from its porny past. Now architect Brian O'Keefe is finishing the job. Permits are on file with the Buildings Department for interior demolition, structural work, excavation and other labor in conjunction with an enlargement. Yesterday Falcone's team, 10 men strong, went before the LPC to make sure the plans are kosher.

    The Landmarks Commission only has a say on the exterior stuff, but the full plans were laid out, from the minor—new windows, facade restoration—to the major, like a new rooftop addition and a cleaned-up, above-grade backyard with a swimming pool. Swimming pool?! What about Guccione's chamber of slippery sin? It's a goner, as is the interior courtyard on the fourth floor, it's open ceiling filled in for the new addition. All of the changes sailed through the LPC, and the plans seen in the gallery above do look like solid improvements. One Upper East Side group did offer some token resistance to the building's rear facade facelift, to no avail. This will no doubt be one of the city's best mansions when all is said and done, but we're sad to see Guccione's grand vision relegated to the history books. But in a world where smut isn't even welcomed in Long Island City, what chance does it stand on the Upper East Side?

    Milbank Mansion coverage [Curbed]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2009/12/0...orn_palace.php

  2. #62
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    I think "jacked-up monstrosity" is rather harsh.



    Townhouse Attempts to Stoop to New Heights

    December 9, 2009, by Joey



    UPPER EAST SIDE—Yesterday the Landmarks Preservation Commission approved some big changes to an UES townhouse, but the new owners of 120 East 71st Street—who bought the five-story house for $5.7 million last summer—weren't so lucky. The proposed changes included new windows and a brand new front stoop. The LPC sent the design team back to the drawing board, especially on the big stoop issue. The 120 East 71st peeps tried to cite the gigantic stoop on the building next door as precedent, but here's the thing: A bunch of folks apparently think that one's a jacked-up monstrosity. Wanna see it?



    http://curbed.com/archives/2009/12/0...ights.php#more

  3. #63
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    Default Madison Avenue

    Streetscapes | Madison Avenue

    Scars From a Forgotten Skirmish

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY


    Left, the tall Verona has a squat neighbor, 717-719 Madison Avenue. The Verona bears the marks of a vanished terra-cotta band.


    Verona today


    Verona 1922

    THE soft, newly cleaned copper of the 1923 storefronts at 717-719 Madison Avenue is a lovely sight, one of the best shop facades on the avenue. But next door, the elegant Verona apartment house of 1908, at 64th Street, bares a raw scar of mutilated terra cotta, almost as a reproach.

    The strange, intertwined tale of these two structures is one of the mysteries of Madison Avenue.

    In 1907, Victor Kranich, a piano dealer and inventor, and Richard W. Buckley Jr., an architect, began work on a 10-story apartment house at the southeast corner of 64th and Madison Avenue, which at that point was a brownstone street emerging as an apartment house address.

    The luxury apartment age was dawning, and their architect, William E. Mowbray, produced an Italian Renaissance-style facade of such bearing and dignity that few other buildings have surpassed it in elegance. With generous allowance for the exigencies of New York, it is a near thing to the Strozzi Palace, divided into three horizontal sections, with widely spaced large windows with Florentine arches, and a deep overhanging cornice.

    The building was completed in 1908, with two 14-room apartments per floor. In that year, The Real Estate Record and Guide noted that the rentals ranged from $8,000 per year, for the lower floors, to $11,500 per year, for the highest floors. By then, value had begun to rise with height.

    The same journal reported that the apartments had private elevators, so that tenants could live “without the annoyance and discomforts of a public hallway.”

    And an advertisement in The New York Times in 1910 said that each apartment in the Verona was “an absolutely detached residence” for “families of refinement.”

    For the line on the Madison Avenue side, floor plans show an en suite arrangement of four entertaining rooms — a dining room, a billiard room, a library and a salon — and five fireplaces, including two in the four bedrooms. There were two maid’s rooms at one end of the back hall, and at the other end, a “butler’s room,” a designation very rarely seen on apartment plans.

    The 1920 census shows an unexceptional medley of brokers, bankers and other businessmen in occupancy. It found three butlers among the 20 apartments: Jasper Chevis, 40, born in South Carolina; Edward Goodman, 31, Irish-born and in the United States since 1910; and Atanski Nunokawa, 29, Japanese-born and here since 1914.

    Mr. Mowbray addressed an issue that had annoyed architectural critics since the advent of the high-rise: the appearance of the side walls. In a 1912 article in Harper’s Weekly, the writer, Allan Ball, complained that the side walls on tall buildings were almost always left bare, whereas “street fronts are treated with lavish expense, apparently in an ostrichlike application of the theory that the other sides are not seen at all.”

    The classical precedent was for the secondary off-street facades to carry some of the ornament around to show a relation between the side and principal elevations — just what was done at the Strozzi.

    Mr. Mowbray, too, designed the Verona with a decent respect for the opinion of mankind, giving both of the side walls very healthy “returns,” the term for the continuation of the cornice and other decorations around the corner.

    The architect and owners went to some lengths to achieve this effect. The projections extended over the property line of the adjacent row house on Madison Avenue, and the developers had to receive permission from its owners, John and Harriet Mills.

    Their agreement stated that in return for allowing “the artistic design” of the new building, the Millses could request the owners of the Verona to remove the projections at any time, upon 90 days’ notice.

    But in 1912, the Millses had an inexplicable change of heart, and with court permission but without explanation, arranged for the chopping off of the cornice, band courses and other elements on the Madison Avenue side wall, leaving a wound that has never healed. They owned the house for the next decade, so they had ample leisure to contemplate the results. But their motives remain a mystery.

    In 1923, new owners combined the Millses’ row house and its neighbor into a single small apartment house, 717-719 Madison Avenue, and the architect Charles Birge gave it a striking copper storefront, one of the few of its period to survive intact. Early tenants included a British boot maker, a linen shop, an antiques dealer and an interior decorator.

    Recently, the architect Joseph Tarella of Sawicki Tarella Architecture was commissioned to restore the storefronts, which now gleam with a deep, burnished glow.

    But Mr. Tarella, like Mr. Mowbray, sought to add something extra, because the glow now extends to the cornice. It had been hidden by paint or corrosion for decades.

    It appears that he has stripped the copper cornice to its original finish, an unusually elegant touch for such a modest building.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/13/re...gewanted=print

  4. #64
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post

    Landmarks Commision OKs Death of Upper East Side Porn Palace

    Yesterday the Landmarks Preservation Commission approved some big changes to 14-16 East 67th Street, the 48-foot-wide mansion—one of the biggest private homes in the city—combined from two separate townhouses in 1920. In the fourth biggest deal of the decade, filthy rich hedgie Philip Falcone purchased the 27-room home for $49 million in '08. He bought it from the creditors of Bob Guccione, the legendary Penthouse publisher who lived in the mansion for decades before getting forced out ...
    Today I noticed a beautiful townhouse on East 67th just west of Madison that has been done up for the holidays in a grand and elegant way. When I got home I looked on Google Map to make sure I had the right place. As often happens, one thing lead to another ...

    Turns out that in 2004 Philip and Lisa Marie Falcone (big supporters of the High Line) bought this building -- just down the block from 14-16 East 67th -- and converted into a 6-story one-family residence. At that time it was bought from FREP LLC, which apparently is connected with Fletcher Asset Management, which is the baby of Alphonse Fletcher, Jr. a very wealthy and giving individual who makes NYC home.

    A Very Merry Christmas to all -- and a Very Prosperous New Year ...















    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  5. #65
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    That building, the R. Fulton Cutting House, was designed by architects Lamb & Rich. It was only one of a row of six houses that were built in 1879 by the firm for developer & builder Anthony Mowbray (d. 1896) on this block of East 67th Street, including the two at 14-16 East 67th (recently purchased by Falcone from Guccione), as found in the catalog of the work of Lamb & Rich [pdf]:

    Six Houses for Anthony Mowbray at 12-22 East 67th Street, Manhattan, N.Y. 1879, L.&W.

    7.1. House at 12 East 67th Street
    1879, L.&W.; 1895, William B. Tubby; 1920, James G. Rogers

    7.2. House at 14 East 67th Street
    1879, L.&W.; 1919, Dodge & Morrison

    7.3. House at 16 East 67th Street
    1879, L.&W.; 1905, John H. Duncan; 1919, Dodge & Morrison

    7.4. House at 18 East 67th Street
    1879, L.&W.; 1925, Henry C. Pelton

    7.5. House at 20 East 67th Street
    1879, L.&W.

    7.6. House at 22 East 67th Street
    1879, L.&W.; 1908-1909 Harry Allan Jacobs*
    In 1884 Mr. R. Fulton Cutting had a home at 724 Fifth Avenue. Cutting was another New Yorker who put his money to good use. He was the Chairman of the Citizens' Union, as chronicled by Jacob Riis in The Battle with the Slum (1902)

    V. “Druv into Decency”:

    [Par. 19]

    On behalf of a number of well-known capitalists, who had been identified with the cause of tenement-house reform for years, Robert Fulton Cutting, the president of the Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, offered to build homes for the working people that should be worthy of the name, on a large scale. A company was formed, and chose for its president Dr. Elgin R. L. Gould, author of the government report on the “Housing of the Working People,” the standard work on the subject. A million dollars was raised by public subscription, and operations were begun at once.

    Two ideas were kept in mind as fundamental: one, that charity that will not pay will not stay; the other, that nothing can be done with the twenty-five-foot lot. It is the primal curse of our housing system, and any effort toward better things must reckon with it first. Nineteen lots on Sixty-eighth and Sixty-ninth streets, west of Tenth Avenue, were purchased of Mrs. Alfred Corning Clark, who took one tenth of the capital stock of the City and Suburban Homes Company; and upon these was erected the first block of tenements. This is the neighborhood toward which the population has been setting with ever increasing congestion. Already in 1895 the Twenty-second Ward contained nearly 200,000 souls. I gave figures in the previous chapter that showed a crowding of more than 1100 persons per acre in some of the blocks here where the conditions of the notorious Tenth Ward are certain to be reproduced, if indeed they are not exceeded. In the Fifteenth Assembly District some distance below, but on the same line, the first sociological canvass of the Federation of Churches had found the churches, schools, and other educational agencies marshalling a frontage of 756 feet on the street, while the saloon fronts stretched themselves over nearly a mile; so that, said the compiler of these pregnant facts, “saloon social ideals are minting themselves on the minds of the people at the ratio of seven saloon thoughts to one educational thought.” It would not have been easy to find a spot better fitted for the experiment of restoring the home to its place.

    The Alfred Corning Clark buildings, as they were called in recognition of the effort of this public-spirited woman, have at this writing been occupied five years. They harbor nearly four hundred families, as contented a lot as I ever saw anywhere. The one tenant who left in disgust was a young doctor who had settled on the estate, thinking he could pick up a practice among so many. But he couldn’t. They were not often sick, those tenants. Last year only three died, and they were all killed while away from home. So he had good cause of complaint. The rest had none, and having none, they stay, which is no mean blow struck for the home in the battle with the slum. The home feeling can never grow where people do not stay long enough to feel at home, any more than the plant can which the child is pulling up every two or three days to “see if it has roots.”
    ** Harry Allan Jacobs was the architect for 820 Park Avenue (East 75th NW), discussed more in full HERE by Carter B. Horsley :

    One of the strangest buildings on Park Avenue, this eclectic apartment house was originally designed to contain multi-story apartments including a spectacular triplex for its developer, Albert J. Kobler, the publisher of the American Weekly Magazine, a Hearst publication.

  6. #66
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    Default Ralph Lauren

    Lots of visible progress since the last update over two months ago.


    12/27/2009






    A reminder of what the finished product will look like:


  7. #67
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    ^It's going to be so great to see that when completed. I'll be posting lots of photos of that one.
    ---

    Today I noticed a beautiful townhouse on East 67th...
    Lofter, I love that townhouse and she looks so beautiful all dolled up for the holidays
    converted into a 6-story one-family residence
    double
    now that is a gorgeous place to call home. Nice details yet refined and restrained. The stone work looks so precise. Imagine being able to raise a family there.

    But in 1912, the Millses had an inexplicable change of heart, and with court permission but without explanation, arranged for the chopping off of the cornice, band courses and other elements on the Madison Avenue side wall, leaving a wound that has never healed. They owned the house for the next decade, so they had ample leisure to contemplate the results. But their motives remain a mystery.
    I certainly can't imagine why they would have changed their minds after the nice terracotta work was already in place. Strange people. Go figure...

  8. #68
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Developer Unleashes Upper East Side 'McMansions' Plan

    January 6, 2010, by Joey





















    Given the staggering value of townhouses in the Upper East Side Historic District, it's hard to imagine anyone intentionally shrinking their ranks, but that's precisely what developers the Chetrit Group suggested to the Landmarks Preservation Commission yesterday. At stake is the future of 110-120 East 76th Street, six brownstones built in 1885 that were owned by nearby Lenox Hill Hospital for decades, which is also how long the structures were left to rot as plans for a sports medicine center gradually died. Now in the driver's seat, the Chetrit Group—along with architecture firm Macrae-Gibson—has another ambitious plan, which involves gutting, restoring and altering the homes, combining them into three single-family megamansions and—attention pitchfork-wielding Upper East Siders—slapping rooftop additions on each. Here comes controversy!

    The LPC heard the details in back-to-back items scheduled for over an hour of hearing time, so the commission was clearly expecting fireworks. They weren't disappointed. First up was the developer's desire to partially demolish 112 and 114 while preserving their front facades. These two are in the worst shape, and are seen in the photo above with blue plywood out front. The Department of Buildings testified that the demolition of 112 and 114 might weaken adjacent structures to the point where they would need to be selectively demolished behind their front facades, as well. The commissioners approved the partial demolition of 112 and 114 and gave their staff authority to approve additional demolition work at 110 and 116 as deemed necessary by the DOB.

    Next up came the proposed modifications to the buildings, of which there are many. In addition to combining the townhouses and adding two-story rooftop additions (creating three 18,000-square-foot mansions), the Chetrit Group wants to demolish the rear facades of all the buildings, modify the front facades (going limestone in the middle and brownstone on the outer two, while adding touches like balconies and big picture windows), add double-door entrances and more. The opponents in attendance pounced, derisively referring to the mutated double-wides as "bloated McMansions." The LPC didn't vote on the modifications, but the commissioners expressed concerns over combining the townhouses, which is not a good sign for the developer. The commissioners also hinted that the additions are too big, but didn't rule them out completely. So it's back to the drawing board for the design team, and now that the neighbors are all riled up they can expect some extra sets of eyes peeking over their shoulders.

    110-120 East 76th St [New York Landmarks Conservancy]

    http://curbed.com/archives/2010/01/0...sions_plan.php

  9. #69

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    I saw that article yesterday and was too pissed off to comment about further desecration of NY's old buildings.

  10. #70

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    They definitely won't approve that. They need to hire architects who have experience dealing LPC.

  11. #71
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Default Madison Avenue

    Streetscapes | Madison Avenue from 67th to 68th Street

    Back to Its Old Brownstone Self

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    (see article for interactive then and now photos)

    WALK down any street of brownstones, and chances are the history you see is fiction, because the typical restoration for old brownstone facades is a nice new coat of stucco. But the case of the old row house at 797 Madison Avenue is one of sedimentary nonfiction, where the usual brownstone repair has been foresworn for, well, brownstone.

    Madison Avenue was still considered a choice address in 1876 when the developer Robert McCafferty built six brick and brownstone houses, 801-811 Madison, at the southeast corner of 68th. The Real Estate Record and Guide praised the row and called its designer, Richard W. Buckley, “the rising young architect,” although such houses were mostly real estate with just a sprinkling of art.

    Mr. Buckley was followed by Thom & Wilson, who designed four houses at 793-799 Madison Avenue, built in 1881.

    These were houses for the well to do. One resident was Richard S. Newcombe, a lawyer who lived at 805 with his family of seven and four servants. In 1889 his daughter Flora eloped while still in school, with an actor who was accused of bigamy. Mr. Newcombe’s obituary in The New York Times in 1891 noted that he “declined to have anything more to do with her.”

    No. 801 was home to Simon Dinkelspiel, whom The Times in 1891 described as “a notorious gambler and swindler” and one of the New York Life Insurance Company’s “lightning specials” who sold policies under false pretenses.

    The trolley tracks on Madison Avenue, although only a mild annoyance to the families who lived there, attracted trade, and after the turn of the century, shops began sneaking into the stolid brownstone rows. It was an insidious process; only one owner needed to sell for commerce, and the entire row would be compromised.

    In 1912 James Anderson Hawes, a lawyer who lived at 801 Madison, put his house up for sale at auction. But what might have traded quickly in the 1880s found no ready buyer, and in 1914 Mr. Hawes removed the stoop, installed a storefront and painted the building white. A photograph from 1916 shows the other houses intact, the Hawes facade busting in like a cellphone yakker in a quiet car.

    Mr. Hawes’s first tenant was Lewando’s French Dyeing & Cleaning Company of Boston, one of the pioneers in the dry cleaning industry, established in the 19th century and in business until just a few years ago.

    A later commercial tenant was the National Institute of Social Dancing, which in 1923 somehow held its convention within the 18-foot-wide rooms of 801 Madison, according to an account in The Times. The institute was really Arthur Murray, just at the beginning of his career in dancing instruction, who ultimately had hundreds of dance studios all over the globe.

    Presumably it was Mr. Murray who arranged in that year to name the Prince of Wales to “first place among dancers of the world,” and to create a fox trot named after the future English king and abdicator.

    “The good dancer invariably heads the guest list at delightful social functions,” Mr. Murray promised in an ad in The Times in that year.

    The status of the East Side waxed in the 1920s, but as an address Madison lost caste quickly. When an apartment house went up at the north end of the block in 1925 it was labeled 30 East 68th Street.

    The commercial invaders themselves felt threatened by the short-lived Madison Avenue Mall, a street-closing program of the administration of Mayor John V. Lindsay. In 1971 The Times quoted Jimi Fox, who operated a clothing store at 793 Madison, as saying that the mall had “attracted nothing but hippies here.”

    That was the same year that the designer Valentino set up shop in the old Hawes building. He gave it a space-age porcelain enamel facade enclosing a central glass cylinder — what might be called Go-Go Boots Modernism.

    This was replaced in 1985 with the present impassive granite facade designed by Giorgio Cavaglieri, built all the way out to the building line. Its blank windows and hard facade give it the character of an upscale fortress, although without machine guns.

    Now the house at 797 Madison Avenue, once the Kirby Allen and then the Gardenia restaurant, is nearing the end of an unusual renovation, designed by the architect Costas Terzis.

    In a city where the common rule for brownstone facade repair is to trowel on a coat of tinted stucco, dead and flat, this facade has the rich, luminous quality of real stone. That’s because it is real quarried brownstone, cut and installed block by block. The flecks of sparkly minerals, the whorls of the Triassic sedimentary deposits, are all there, just as they were when this row was fresh.

    Mr. Terzis says a simple patch job would have cost about $100,000, but the full brownstone treatment, including the blocks, ended up at $600,000.
    He says the owner is happy because “it’s worth it, what he is getting is an original, not a reproduction.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/17/re.../17scapes.html

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    The Promise of Hamburgers Lifts a Manhattan Street

    By ALISON GREGOR



    The sunken plaza at 182 East 86th Street had been abandoned for so long it had begun to spook neighbors.

    Even when it was occupied, mostly by stores that sold bargain merchandise, it wasn’t much of a destination. “There was never anything good there,” said Jennifer Levine, who lives nearby on 90th Street. “It was always dingy and dilapidated, and it was almost an eyesore. It wasn’t particularly nice to walk by.”

    Now, the plaza, next to the Lucida, a new condominium tower, will become the home of Manhattan’s third Shake Shack burger stand, which promises to bring greenery into the plaza to create a parklike atmosphere. The popular hot dog, burger and frozen custard stand, created in 2004 by Danny Meyer, the New York restaurateur, was one element that improved the atmosphere in Madison Square Park, its first location.

    Some residents of East 86th Street seem to expect it to do no less for them.

    “If you’re around there and want to have a bite to eat, there’s very little,” said Harriet Kaufman, a local resident and residential real estate broker. “I can’t imagine that Shake Shack won’t succeed.”

    The neighborhood, once home to a German-American enclave and a Gimbel’s department store, long ago lost its luster to become a collection of unglamorous retailers and nondescript buildings. But the arrival of new residential development, like the Lucida, has attracted some national retailers to its storefronts.

    While those retailers are larger, their commitment to the community can be limited, say local advocates. Merchants have started a campaign to attract smaller, more upscale retailers and restaurants that will make an investment in the neighborhood.

    An association of merchants and residents, called the East 86th Street Association, has installed lamp posts along the street and plans to add landscaping next.

    “One of the issues we have is, how do we bring in some upscale retailers and restaurants and get them to participate in the community?” said Elaine M. Walsh, the president of the nonprofit association.

    Ms. Walsh said she would like to see 86th Street’s vacant storefronts filled, but she has mixed feelings about the Shake Shack. While the restaurant has a good reputation, and Mr. Meyer has many upscale Manhattan restaurants, Ms. Walsh said she didn’t know if East 86th Street needed another burger stand. Besides several diners and coffee shops selling burgers, there are Burger King and Papaya King.

    “Do we want long lines waiting to go into Shake Shack, or do we want restaurants that can accommodate patrons with a sit-down dinner of high quality?” Ms. Walsh asked.

    Shake Shack has signed a 15-year lease at 182 East 86th Street, which is between Lexington and Third Avenues at the base of the 440-unit apartment building with circular balconies known as Park Lane Tower.

    Neither the landlord nor the lessee would reveal the negotiated price. The company’s owners expect to open within the year in the 3,200-square-foot retail space, which is reached via the 2,750-square-foot sunken plaza.

    The landlords for 182 East 86th Street, which include the Charles H. Greenthal Management Corporation, have been slowly upgrading the interiors and exteriors over the last two years, spending $2 million to sheathe it in granite, and add a handicapped access ramp and steel gate.

    Shake Shack’s chief operating officer, Randy Garutti, said he spotted the space one winter’s day while out for a stroll. Heavily gated, its ramps were once used by skateboarders who frequented a bike and roller skating shop.

    It was also the location of a fabric store, a gift shop and a vacuum retailer.

    There was interest in the space from other restaurants, but the owners say they were happy to sign Shake Shack in the space.

    “We’ve just been waiting for the right deal, and we got it,” said Harold A. Bornstein, a Greenthal vice president. “We wanted someone that could use the plaza.”

    Mr. Garutti said the Shake Shack intended to make the plaza a place for patrons to have picnics. They will be able to place orders at the Shake Shack stand. There will also be seating inside, he said. Though the plaza extends through to 85th Street, it will be open only on the 86th Street side.

    Across the plaza from Park Lane Tower, the 22-story Lucida on the corner of 86th Street and Lexington has the bookstore Barnes & Noble, the clothing store H & M and Sephora, the cosmetics chain.

    A block east on the corner of 85th Street and Third Avenue, another new 22-story building, the Brompton, accommodates an Equinox fitness center and has 4,000 square feet — and ample basement space — with 72 feet of store frontage along 86th Street that is still available for lease.

    One resident of the Park Lane Tower said she worried about smells from the new Shake Shack. The resident, who declined to give her name, has a balcony. “I live on the 10th floor — will it smell up there?”

    The answer should be no, said William West, the chairman of Charles H. Greenthal, who said he went to great lengths in negotiating the lease with Shake Shack to protect neighbors from odors or nuisance.

    Other residents of the area — those who do not live in Park Lane Tower — said they believed Shake Shack would be welcomed in a neighborhood that tends to appeal to young families.

    “My husband is so excited,” said Ms. Levine, who has two daughters. “I think it’s certainly welcome. It’s not like a chain; it’s not another Burger King or Pizzeria Uno. I think 86th Street has become so commercialized, like a mini-mall, so it’s nice to have something more neighborly.”

    Another resident, David Kachoui, who has a 2-year-old daughter, said he did not believe the Shake Shack’s lines would be any worse than those of the three cinemas in the neighborhood. “As long as they manage it, and they’re responsible and orderly about it, it should be O.K.” he said.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/20/re...l?ref=nyregion

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    Hopeful Upper East Side McMansions on Eve of Destruction

    March 30, 2010, by Joey





    The Chetrit Group's mission to restore, renovate and enlarge six brownstones at 110-120 East 76th Street—turning them into three single-family mansions along the way—is on hold for now, but the Landmarks Preservation Commission did give the go-ahead for partial demolition of some of the structures. That work is about ready to kick off, based on fresh photos of the brownstone row between Lexington and Park. The demolition is due to deteriorating conditions in some of the townhouses, which were owned for decades by Lenox Hill Hospital. The rest of the proposed changes are coming back to LPC for what should be a lively hearing on April 13.

    Developer Unleashes Upper East Side 'McMansions' Plan [Curbed]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/0...estruction.php

  14. #74

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    Some a_hole wants to tear those gems down? This is f..cked up.

  15. #75

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    I dont believe theyre tearing them down, just combining them internally. The facades and setbacks will be preserved, so dont get your panties in a knot.

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