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  1. #166

    Default Manhattan 1960s

    1965

    Hi!!!! We're back with this travel through the history of New York skyscrapers during the 20th Century. Now, we continuing with our trip in the 1960's and now, show this post about the city in 1965. In these year the Gemini V space shuttle round the Earth while more people were angried withe the US Govement for the Vietnam War. In these year pope Paul VI visit New York City and talk in United Nations General Assembly.

    The city continuing to live the joy of the 1964-1965 World Fair in a November 9 and 10 of 1965, a blackout gave the city on complete darkness. The energy shortage on Con Edison Power Plant in Niagara Falls caused that all New York City and the entire state of New York (including all Long Island) and Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Ontario Canada were on darkness.

    Many New Yorkers were helped to other citizens during the power shortage giving shelter, free food, helping to police in the correct function of transist system in the streets; helping in hospitals, churchs and schools. In these black nights, New York City show the best face of their citizens. Nine months after the blackout New York City registered a baby boom record.

    In architecture topics, 1965 were a year of more new building and the office tower constrction activity continuing increassing.

    Example of offices towers that be inaugurated in 1965:

    • 38-story black granite and glass slab CBS Building at Sixth Avenue and East 52 and 53rd Street (Eero Saarinen).
    • 48-story aluminum columns and blue tinted glass curtain-wall J.C. Penney Building on Sixth Avenue and West 52nd and 53rd Street (Shreve, Lamb & Harmon).
    • 38-story blue aluminum and glass curtain wall mixed-use, twin-towered 860 and 870 United Nations Plaza, on First Avenue and East 48th to 49th Streets (Harrison & Abramovitz).
    • 28-story Xerox Building on Third Avenue and East 42nd and 43rd Streets (Emery Roth & Sons).
    • 41-story brown aluminum and glass curtain-wall ABC Building on Sixth Avenue and East 53rd and 54th Streets (Emery Roth & Sons).
    • 44-story Home Insurance Building in Financial District, in Nassau Street, just behing Chase Manhattan Bank tower.
    • 30-story 110 Wall Street Building, just behind the old 1930 120 Wall Street.
    • 25-story Allied Chemical Building on One Times Square, a modern makeover of old 1904-05 Times Tower.
    Examples of buildings that be rises up on 1965 that will be scheduled for completion in 1966:
    • 33-story MGM Building on Sixth Avenue and East 55th Street, behind the Warwick Hotel.
    • 54-story 245 Park Avenue Building (Shreve Lamb & Harmon). The steel structure of the building begun to raises in late summer of 1965.
    Examples of buildings that excavation and construction activity begun during 1965.
    • 54-story Marine Midland Building, in Financial District. Excavation
    • 50-story black aluminum and glass curtain-wall 299 Park Avenue Building. Demolition of old Park Lane Hotel and excavation of the site.
    Now, a general panorama of 1965:

    A New York Airways arriving to Pan Am Building heliport. January 1965.




    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking northeast from the bay showing a merchant ship to leave the city. February 1965.




    Lower Manhattan skyline looking west from Brooklyn's St. George Hotel. February 1965.




    Midtown Manhattan looking east from RCA Building. April 1965.




    Love in New York. Night view of Midtown looking southwest from Beekman Tower Hotel with two lovers. April 1965.




    The new look of Midtown. Aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking southwest showing in foregroung the new twin towers of 860 and 870 United Nations Plaza nearing completion.




    New modernity. Night view of the 64-story slab of Chase Manhattan Bank Building as seen from Singer Building looking east. May 1965.





    And the day.




    The Pan Am Building as seen from Park Avenue South and 37th Street. May 1965.





    Midtown Manhattan looking northeast from Empire State Building showing the Pan Am and Chrysler Buildings. May 1965.




    Yuxtaposition of old and new and modern skyscrapers in Midtown: View of Midtown Manhattan looking northwest from United Nations Secretariat Building. June 1965.





    Lower Manhattan's Financial District skyline and Brooklyn Bridge looking southwest from East River. June 1965.




    A great loss: The old 1910's Pennsylvania Station were completly demolished in 1965. Will be sustitute for this: New Madison Square Garden Sports Center and 29-story Two Pennsylvania Plaza Building. Model of new complex. June 1965. The demolition of old Pennsylvania Station were detonate the creation of the New York City Preservation Commision that had a great role on the salvation of Grand Central Terminal.




    The new CBS Building. June 1965. Photos: Joseph Molitor. From Architectural Record. July 1965:

    Looking to northeast.




    View to southeast from J.C. Penney west wing.




    Building elevation. July 1965. Photo: Joseph Molitor.




    A impressive fish eye aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking southwest. July 1965.





    Lower Manhattan looking southwest from East River showing from left to right: 60 Wall Tower (1932), the Bank of Manhattan Building at 40 Wall Street (1930), the new slab of Chase Manhattan Bank Building (1961) and the new 44-story Home Insurance Building (1965) and other old skyscrapers. July 1965.





    Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges as seen from East River looking southwest. July 1965.





    The 102-story Empire State Building as seen from RCA Building looking south. The tall building of foreground is the 500 Fifth Avenue Building, that it was build in 1930-31, almost the same time than Empire State. July 1965.






    Upper Manhattan looking north from Empire State Building showing some Midtown skyscrapers. July 1965.




    Aerial view of Lincoln Center looking southeast showing Midtown. August 1965.





    The CBS Building looking southeast froM New York Hilton Hotel. August 1965. Photo: TIME Magazine.





    Times Square looking south from 46th Street showing the new modern makeover of old Times Tower, now called the Allied Chemical Building. August 1965.





    Midtown Manhattan looking southwest from CBS Building. September 1965.




    Sixth Avenue's new skyscrapers. September 1965.




    The CBS Building looking west from Equitable Life Building's west wing. September 1965.




    Aerial view of Midtwon Manhattan looking east from Hudson River. October 1965.




    Aerial view of Greenwich Village looking northeast showing Midtown Manhattan skyline. October 1965.




    Aerial view of Rockefeller Center looking southwest. October 1965. The building of the extreme right is the new 41-story ABC Building.




    A unusual picture: Gene Kelly as sing on the top of RCA Building during a film rodage. The building under construction behind him and behind the ABC tower, at left is the 33-story MGM Building on Sixth Avenue. October 1965.




    Midtown Manhattan looking northeast from Empire State Building. October 1965.




    The new look of old Times Tower. Now, the building are modern and it is renamed as The Allied Chemical Building. October 1965.




    THE NEW YORK CITY BLACKOUT. NOVEMBER 9 TO 10, 1965. Photos by The New York Times:

    Midtown Manhattan skyline on total darkness. View from the Times building. November 9, 1965.




    View of Midtown Manhattan looking east from New Jersey. November 9, 1965.





    Midtiown Manhattan in the early hours of the morning of November 10, 1965.




    Few minutes after, the lights were back.




    Midtown Manhattan were illuminated again. November 10, 1965. Views from Time & Life Building. Photos: LIFE Magazine.

    3:17 A.M.





    4:29 A.M. Lights were back in the streets and in some buildings.




    At 4:44 A.M. The Empire State Building was the last in be enlighted.




    Love in New York. View of Midtown looking south from RCA Building with two lovers. November 1965.




    Aerial view of Pan Am and Chrysler Building. December 1965. Photo: LIFE Magazine.




    Midtown Manhattan looking northeast from Empire State Building. December 1965.





    Aerial view of the top of the Pan Am Building looking south showing the Empire State Building. December 1965.




    Next, a general panorama of 1966.


    Your opinion is important. If you have a commentary of want to post a picture about Manhattan during 20th Century, please show here, in this post.

    Thank You!!!
    Last edited by erickchristian; April 5th, 2010 at 08:43 PM.

  2. #167

    Default Manhattan 1960s

    1966

    Hi!! We're back with this trip through the history of New York skyscrapers during the 20th Century. Now, continuing our trip in the 1960's we're in 1966, when a new contraculture San Francisco's Hippie psychedellic movement come to New York and the first Be In festivals were realized in Central Park and Washington Square, whith music, color and joy, including LSD and marihuana.

    In these year demostrations against Vietnam War were increased and reached international interest. Thousands of people walk on Manhattan streets, front the United Nations, in the City Hall.

    In skyscrapers New York continuing living the great office building boom. In 1966 construction activity begun for the World Trade Center complex in Lower Manhattan and 16 acres of land were cleared in the zone once called "Radio Row" and many building were demolished, including the old twin buildings of Hudson Terminal.

    Another architectural loss for 1966 were the demolition of 30-story Beaux-Arts french style Savoy Plaza Hotel (McKim, Mead & White 1927), in Fifth Avenue and 58th to 59th Streets, front Grand Army Plaza, to make way to the new 52-story white marble monolith General Motors Building. Another skyscraper lost was the 22-story Ambassador Hotel, in Park Avenue between East 51th to 52nd Streets, that were demolished in 1966 to make way to 50-story 345 Park Avenue Building.



    Many new offices and apartments buildings were open during 1966. For example:
    • 54-story 245 Park Avenue Building (Shreve, Lamb & Harmon). This building were finally open in late 1966.
    • 33-story MGM Building on Sixth Avenue and East 55th Street.
    • 33-story three towers of New York University Plaza (I.M. Pei & Partners).
    Many other offices and apartment buildings were rises up during 1966. For example:
    • 45-story Excelsior Apartments, on Second Avenue and 57th Street.
    • 50-story 299 Park Avenue Building.
    • 54-story Marine Midland Bank Building, on Financial District, on Broadway behind the old Equitable Building.
    • 30-story New York Telephone Building Murray Hill Office Building.
    • 42-story Federal Building in Foley Square, on Civic District.
    And construction works begun in 1966 for other buildings. for example:
    • 110-story twin-towered World Trade Center (demolition of Radio Row District and excavation).
    • 52-story General Motors Building (demolition of Savoy Plaza Hotel and excavation).
    • 42-story ITT North America Building on Madison Avenue (excavation).
    • 50-story 345 Park Avenue Building (demolition of old Ambassador Hotel).
    • 33-story 909 Third Avenue Building (excavation).
    • 28-story Citibank Building on Franklyn Delano Roosevelt Drive and Wall Street opposite 120 Wall Street Building (excavation).
    Now, a general panorama of 1966.

    Midtown Manhattan looking southeast from Sherry-Netherland Hotel. March 1966. Show in this picture the progress of the demolition works for the site that destined for General Motors Building (right) and the shadow of the old Savoy Plaza that demolition were begun.




    A gropu of young French sailors watching Midtown Manhattan from RCA Building. View to southeast showing Pan Am and Chrysler Building and the skeleton of 245 Park Avenue Building (center, at background) under construction.




    Night view of Midtown Manhattan looking east from RCA Building showing Park Avenue's tallest buildings and the 245 Park Avenue Building under construction (right). April 1966.




    Art Deco jewels: The Chrysler Building between the old General Electric Building (left) and the towers of Waldorf-Astoria Hotel (right). April 1966.




    St. Patrick's Cathedral. April 1966.




    Midtown Manhattan skyscrapers from Union Square looking north. May 1966.




    Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridge looking southwest from Manhattan Bridge. May 1966. The building under construction of the center right of the picture, behind Chase Manhattan tower is the Marine Midland Building.




    Midtown Manhattan looking northeast from Empire State Building. May 1966.





    Night view of Midtown Manhattan looking south from RCA Building. May 1966.




    The new look of Third Avenue. View looking north from 40th Street. June 1966.




    The 30-story 200 East 42nd Street Building (1959) and 41-story Continental Can Building (1961) as seen from Socony Mobil Building. June 1966.




    Vertical aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking north. July 1966.





    Vertical aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking north above Pan Am Building. July 1966.




    A close up of this picture showing the new 54-story 245 Park Avenue Building nearing completion. July 1966.





    Another vertical view, now over the axis of Park Avenue, above the skeleton of 299 Park Avenue Building under construction. July 1966.




    Midtown Manhattan looking north from Empire State Building. July 1966. The Rockefeller Center now were surrounded by new Sixth Avenue buildings in the west and north sides.




    Aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking south above the axis of Park Avenue. July 1966.




    Aerial view of Statue of Liberty with Lower Manhattan Skyline on background. July 1966. Photo: Time & Life Book Middle Atlantic States.




    Night view of Lower Manhattan skyline looking west from Brooklyn docks. July 1966.




    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking northeast showing the new 54-story Marine Midland Building (left) under construction. August 1966.




    Aerial view of Manhattan Island looking north. August 1966. Photo: Skyviews Aerial Surveys. In these picture can see tha magnitude of the office building boom and the shape of Manhattan skyline.




    Aerial view of Statue of Liberty with Manhattan on the background. August 1966.




    Aerial view of Chrysler Building. September 1966. The new big building behind it is the 245 PArk Avenue Building (Shreve Lamb & Harmon).




    Aerial close-up of the top of Empire State Building looking northwest. September 1966.




    Aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking southwest from East River. September 1966. Photo: Wurts.




    Aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking northwest showing Empire State Building at foreground. October 1966.




    Aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking northwest showing Pan Am Building and the Rockefeller Center and new Sixth Avenue skyscrapers on the background. October 1966.




    Sixth Avenue and West 52nd Street. October 1966.




    Autum in Central Park. October 1966.




    Aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking northeast from Empire State Building. October 1966.




    Park Avenue. October 1966.




    View of Sixth Avenue new skyscrapers from the Museum of Modern Art looking west. October 1966. The skyscrapers from left to right are: J.C. Penney, ABC and MGM buildings.




    Midtown Manhattan looking north from RCA Building during the worst pollution day in the city. November 1966.




    Midtown Manhattan looking south from Time & Life Building during smoggy day. November 1966. Photo: LIFE Magazine.




    The Paramount Building. November 1966.




    Next week a 1967 special of Marine Midland Building.

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    Thank You!!!
    Last edited by erickchristian; April 6th, 2010 at 09:47 PM.

  3. #168

    Default Manhattan 1960s

    1967 Special

    THE MARINE MIDLAND BUILDING







    Minimalist Playground



    Hi!!! We’re back on this trip through the history of New York skyscrapers. Now, continuing our travel in the 1960’s, we are in 1967, the year of love, psychedelic and crazy music. 1967 was the year of the Marine Midland Bank building, a dark 52-story black aluminum and glass slab that rises on 140 Broadway.

    The Marine Midland Building was designed by Gordon Bunshaft, the master architect of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, who designed many of the New York’s most famous Modernist skyscrapers like Lever House, Union Carbide Building and Chase Manhattan Bank Building. Bunshaft designed the Marine Midland was considered as one of the most pure elements of the International Style Modernist of late 1960’s, but with its skyscraper, Bunshaft created a personal style, that were different as his past works. The new Bunshaft’s style is more minimalist, more futurist, more public and more spectacular, with the inclusion of modernist sculptures in the plaza. The Marine Midland start this new age in the work of Bunshaft that was culminated in early 1970’s with buildings like Grace Building and Solow Buildings were changed the aluminum for travertine marble in its facades.

    The Marine Midland were built in Lower Manhattan when the Financial District were begun to experiment a urban renewal to find the revitalization of the World’s financial capital that was begun with the construction of Chase Manhattan Bank Building in 1957-61 and culminated with the Twin Towers of World Trade Center (1966-1976). The Marine Midland was built between 1965 and 1967 on a crucial moment on the life of Financial District. When the 54-story building were under construction in 1966, construction work begun for the 110-story, twin-towered World Trade Center, two blocks to the west and when the Marine Midland were completed, in 1967, the demolition of the old 47-story 1907 Renaissance style Singer tower were begun for make way to 55-story One Liberty Plaza.

    The birth.

    The Marine Midland was conceived in early 1960’s as a important part of the revitalization of the Financial District. The project from 140 Broadway Building (also the building is known) were announced for first time in 1961 shortly after the success opening of Chase Manhattan Bank Building.

    According with architect Robert A.M. Stern (1997):

    “In 1991 plans were announced for 140 Broadway, a new building that would rival Chase in the quality of its architectural and urban design. Also know as the Marine Midland Building, 140 Broadway (1967) was designed by Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. The first scheme, initially developed by Erwin Wolfson shortly before his death, called for a thirty-two-story tower similar to the Chase Bank in design, with two plazas to break up and ‘aerate’ the lower Broadway canyon. This scheme was to have masonry sunshades projecting beyond the floor slab. When the project was taken over by Harry Hemsley at the invitation of Carl Morse, the builder, it was redesigned. As it evolved, the fifty-two-story tower slab became an essay in curtain-wall minimalism, rising without setbacks from its slightly trapezoidal site, bounded by Broadway, Liberty; Nassau and Cedar streets. One of first tall buildings built under the 1961 zoning ordinance, it replaced York & Sawyer’s Guaranty Trust Company Building of 1913” (Stern, Robert A.M., Mellins, Thomas. Fishman, David. New York 1960. Architecture and urbanism between the Second World War and the Bicentennial. New York. The Monacelli Press. Second Edition. 1997. Page 179).

    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking northeast showing the new Marine Midland Building under construction (extreme left). August 1966.





    Minimalism in extreme.

    The Marine Midland is a minimalism in extreme, it as black a simple an immense black building, the tallest on these time on these style. The facade is a minimalist combination of black aluminum and glass that formed a curtain wall where the glass dominated it and reflect other buildings in the zone.

    The Marine Midland Building rises as a immense black monolith over Lower Manhattan Financial District skyline and in the time of its completion, in spring 1967, the black slab strongly contrast with the brown and gold tones of old Lower Manhattan skyscrapers and, also, contrast with the silvery blue facade of the Chase building. The black monolith of the Marine Midland Building look like the immense black monolith that was discovered by primitive monkeys in the immensity of the desert in the 1968 Stanley Kubrick’s picture 2001 a Space Oddity.

    According with Stern (1997):

    “Though the revised building, with its virtually flat facades, seemed the embodiment of an aesthetic minimalism driven by economics, it was in fact costlier to build than the typical commercial product. As Bunshaft was to recall: ‘This building, due to the wisdom of Wolfson initially, Hemsley waking up, and Carl Morse urging that it not be the cheapest building in the world but the most economical one, set higher standards somewhat –not up to what Chase would do, but more than an Emery Roth building would have’. The building occupied 40 percent of the site and rose 677 feet, leaving wide areas of travertine-paved sidewalk on all sides. Not exactly a plaza, and certainly not an outdoor room, the open space of the second scheme was nonetheless a very welcome relief top the area. By virtue of its connections to the Chase plaza, the wide sidewalks created an element that planers and architects began to seize upon as the beginning of a network of linked pedestrian open spaces crossing the island. The first two floors of the building contained a branch office of the Marine Midland Bank. Its sleekly Modernist interiors were an appropriate extension of the building’s exterior minimalism” (Stern. 1997. Fragment).

    The Marine Midland Building (Skidmore, Owings & Merril, 1967). View looking west from Chase Manhattan Bank Plaza. April 1967. Photo: J. Alex Langley. ARCHITECTURAL RECORD.





    Detail of the facade. The Woolworth Building appear on left. January 1968.




    The semiotics of Noguchi’s Cube

    A mean attractive of the building is the sunken plaza that was paved with travertine marble, decorated with a immense sculpture called “The Red Cube” of Isamu Noguchi, that consist in a red painted steel rhombohedron structure pierced by a cylindrical hole in the center. The red cube and the people in the plaza with the immense scale of the building creating on the site the effect of a great architectural model. These semiotic of the building, the plaza and Noguchi’s sculpture created a effective dialogue with the sidewalks that was seemed in the pictures was taken for architectural photographer Ezra Stoller who took pictures of the building between 1967 and 1968.

    According with Stern (1997):

    “One of most memorable aspects of 140 Broadway was its dialogue with the red cube designed by Isamu Noguchi for the Broadway Plaza: At first, Bunshaft, fresh from a trip to Stonehenge, proposed that Noguchi create a megalith, but Hemsley felt the estimate for such apiece was too high. The architect then proposed a cube to Noguchi, who took the idea further, producing a rhombohedron pierced by a cylindrical hole, the vertically of which complemented the slender vertically of the building behind it. As Bunshaft’s biographer Carol Kinsky was to later write: ‘This is probably Noguchi’s most popular work of art done in conjunction with architecture, partly because it requires not interpretation. It is a teasingly precarious-looking object for a sober building.’ Fortune was more ambivalent: surveying lower Manhattan’s new office buildings in 1969, it observed that ‘the few attempts at decoration, like Isamu Noguchi’s punctured cube… show how far U.S. culture has moved from romantic humanist since Prometheus was installed at Rockefeller Center in 1934’” (Stern. 1997. Pages 179-180).


    The Marine Midland Building and its plaza, showing the Isamu Noguchi's sculpture "Red Cube". October 1967. Photo: Ezra Stoller.




    The Marine Midland Building inmerse as a black monolith in the Lower Manhattan's Financial District skyline. Aerial view looking northeast. June 1967.





    Next, a general review of 1967.

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  4. #169

    Default Manhattan 1960s

    1967

    Hi!!! We're back on this travel through the history of New York skyscrapers. Now, continuing our trip through the 1960's, show a general panorama of the city in 1967. The year of peace, love and flowers. In 1967 American goverment were on crisis because the public reaction against Vietnam War were many people, specially young people, protesting in College campus, in the streets and many young men burning his Army reclutation cards in protest. 1967 is the year of the begun of war between Israel and Egypt that begun the conflict between Israel and Arabian countries that persist to 21st Century. Racial conflict persist in America when few groups were radicalized the fight for the emancipation of black people. The Black Panthers, the most radical of these groups called for a internal war against the U.S. Goverment.

    1967 is the year of the sexual revolution. The Hippie movement called for the liberation of sex practices. Free love.

    1967 is the year when the feminist movement begun to rises up for the equality between men and women.

    1967 is too, the year of psychedellic explosion. Youn people, very long haired men and women organized be-in festival in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and New York. Colors, extravagant dresses, allucinant music and drugs like LSD and Marihuana were symbolized the Flower Power. The climax point of Hippie movement of 1967 were the called Summer of Love, between June and September 1967. A magic moment were the climax was the famous Monterrey Pop Festival, near San Francisco. In New York were famous the Be-In festivals in Central Park's Sheep Meadow.

    In the history of New York City skyscraper architecture 1967 was the year that many office buildings were completed, but many other begun to raises up changing the skyline. The office building boom that begun in early 1950's was experiment, in 1967, a great climax in a number of offices building that be constructed. This tendences was culminated until early 1973. This building boom climax really mean a one thing: New York begun to experiment a overdemand of office space to causes few years after a crisis in the construction activity.

    In 1967 New York begun to experiment fiscal and infraestructure problems.






    But many offices and apartments building were inaugurated during 1967. For Example:
    • 52-story Marine Midland Building at 140 Broadway (Skidmore, Owings and Merrill).
    • 30-story New York Telephone Building in Murray Hill (Kahn & Jacobs). 233 East 37th Street, between Third and Second Avenues.
    • 42-story U.S. Federal Building on Foley Square at Civic Center.
    • 45-story Excelsior Apartments in Second Avenue and East 57th Street.
    • 42-story ITT North American Building in Madison Avenue and East 48th to 49th Streets.
    • 50-story black aluminum and black-tinted-glass curtain-wall facade 299 Park Avenue Building (Emery Roth & Sons).
    Other buildings were under construction to rises up changing the skyline
    • 52-story General Motors Building, in Fifth and Madison Avenues between East 58th to 59th Streets..
    • 29-story Two Pennsylvania Plaza and Madison Square Garden, in the site of the old Pennsylvania Station.
    • 28-story First National City Bank Building in Franklyn Delano Roosevelt Drive and Wall Street.
    • 33-story 909 Third Avenue Building.
    • 20-story Four New York Plaza Building.
    Construction activity begun for these buildings
    • 110-story Twin Towers of World Trade Center (excavation).
    • 55-story Burlington House Building on Sixth Avenue between West 54th to 55th Streets (excavation).
    • 52-story 345 Park Avenue Building (excavation)
    • 45-story Bankers Trust Annex Building (excavation).
    • 45-story 1133 Sixth Avenue Building (demolition of existent building and excavation)
    • 50-story One New York Plaza (excavation)
    • 42-story One Battery Park Plaza (excavation)
    • 45-story 1700 Broadway Building (excavation)
    • 42-story 1414 Broadway Building (demolition of old 1886 Metropolitan Opera House and excavation).
    Three great architectural lost of 1967 were the begun the demolition activity of the 48-story 1908 Ernest Flagg's Singer Building to make way for One Liberty Plaza Building. In 1967 the old 10-story Astor Hotel of 1904 on 1515 Broadway, in Times Square were demolished to make way to new 54-story One Astor Plaza and the old Metropolitan Opera House were demolished afther the Opera House were moved to the new building in Lincoln Center.

    Now, a general panorama of the city in 1967.

    New times: a crazy 1960 pink Cadillac were parking in Sixth Avenue, on the plaza of Time & Life Building. The buildings were show from left to right is: Equitable Building, J.C. PenneyBuilding, New York Hilton, MGM Building, Warwick Hotel and ABC Building. 1967.





    A close up of 42nd Street skyscrapers from Empire State Building. 1967.





    Night view of Times Square looking northeast. 1967.




    The Statue of Liberty and Lower Manhattan skyline. February 1967.




    The new 52-story Marine Midland Building looking west from Chase Manhattan Building Plaza. March 1967. Photo: J. Alex Langley. ARCHITECTURAL RECORD.




    The new 45-story Excelsior Apartments in Second Avenue and 57th Street. Vew looking east. March 1967.




    Night aerial view of Manhattan Island looking northwest. April 1967.





    The 100 Park Avenue Building and the Sterling & Drug Building from Empire State Building. April 1967.




    Lower Manhattan skyline looking north from Governors Island. May 1967.




    Night jazz concert in Central Park. View to the southeast showing Fifth Avenue's skyscrapers with the new General Motors Building under construction. May 1967.


    Night view of Midtown Manhattan looking southwest from a East 57 Street apartment building. May 1967.



    A close up showing the Empire State Building. May 1967.





    Midtown Manhattan looking northeast from Empire State Building. May 1967.






    Lower Manhattan skyline and Greenwich Village looking south from Empire State Building. May 1967.






    Night view of Midtown Manhattan looking north from Empire State Building. June 1967.




    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking northeast. June 1967.




    Sixth Avenue new skyscrapers. From left to right: J.C. Penney, ABC, CBS and Sperry-Rand buildings. June 1967.




    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking south from Lower East Side. July 1967.




    Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridge. July 1967.




    Lower Manhattan looking west from South Street docks. July 1967.





    Night view of Midtown Manhattan looking southwest from RCA Building. July 1967.





    Night view of Midtown Manhattan looking southwest from Beekman Tower Hotel. July 1967.




    The J.C. Penney Building. July 1967.





    Midtown Manhattan looking northeast from Empire State Building. August 1967.






    Excavation works on the site for the World Trade Center. View looking north showing the old Barclay-Vesey Building. September 1967.





    The Rockefeller Center looking west from Newsweek Building (444 Madison Avenue). September 1967.




    Night view of Rockefeller Center. September 1967.




    The Queen Mary left for last time the New York Harbor. View looking east showing Lower Manhattan skyline. September 27, 1967.




    Aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking south over the axis of Fifth Avenue showing the skeleton of the 52-story General Motors Building (left at foreground) under construction. October 1967.





    A part of late 1967 advertising showing Lower Manhattan skyline and Brooklyn Bridge. View looking southwest showing the skeleton of Citibank Building at left of ziggurated 120 Wall Street Building. October 1967.




    Midtown Manhattan looking west from Long Island City, in Queens. October 1967. Photo: Hideaki Sato





    Midtown Manhattan looking northeast from Empire State Building. October 1967.



    The Marine Midland Building Plaza with the Noguchi's sculpture "Red Cube". October 1967. Photo: Ezra Stoller.





    Aerial view of United Nations Headquarters looking northwest from East River. November 1967.




    Night view of Lower Manhattan looking west from Brooklyn Bridge approach. December 1967. Part 1




    Part 2.




    Next, a 1967-1968 special of the demolition of Singer Building.

    Your opinion is important. If you have a commentary of want to post a picture about Manhattan during 20th Century, please show here, in this post.

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    Last edited by erickchristian; April 13th, 2010 at 02:33 PM.

  5. #170
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Very interesting -- this view must show a mock-up / model of the plan as originally proposed for two round towers on a big round base for the site to the south of the Manhattan Bridge where Confucius Plaza now stands -- that horrendous pile by the architectural duo of Horowitz & Chun (IMHO one of the worst buildings in Manhattan) started construction in 1974

    Quote Originally Posted by erickchristian View Post
    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking south from Lower East Side. July 1967.


  6. #171

    Default

    Thanks, lofter. I was wondering what was going on there.

  7. #172
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Also in that shot: No One Police Plaza. No Verizon on Pearl. No Southbridge complex. No NY Plaza, 1-4. And loads of other boxes.

    A blank slate.

    And some folks argue that anything is better than a parking lot. It makes one wonder.

  8. #173

    Default Manhattan 1960s

    1967-68 Special

    The demolition of Singer Building.



    The death of the building, the born of a legend.

    Hi!!! We’re continued in this trip through the history of New York skyscrapers. Continuing our trip in the 1960s, were show this special of 1967-1968 dedicated to one the most architectural loss of the New York architecture of 20th Century: the demolition of the Ernest Flagg’s 47-story Beaux Arts Renaissance Style Singer, that be built in 1908 and it was the tallest building of the world until the construction of the Metropolitan Life Tower. The Singer Building was the tallest building in the city to be demolished until the destruction of the 110-story Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in September 11, 2001.

    The Singer Building and other buildings, including the 32-story City Investing Building was demolished between 1967 and 1968 victims of the building speculation. These old and memorable old buildings, considered a real work of art and one of New York’s first skyscrapers (in June 2009, I wrote about the Singer Building in a special about it. See Page 1 of this thread), was torn down by the wrecking ball to make way a another speculative monolith, the 54-story black tinted steel and glass new headquarters of U.S. Steel Building, also know as One Liberty Plaza, that finally was built on the site between 1969 and 1973, at same time as the Twin Towers were build.

    Robert A.M. Stern (1997) wrote about the demolition of the Singer Building:

    “In 1967 Ernest Flagg’s Singer Tower of 1908, once of the world’s tallest and still one of its most distinguished skyscrapers, gained the dubious distinction of being the tallest building ever torn down. Flagg had designed the tower to rise above the ten-story, mansard-roofed Singer headquarters he had completed in 1899. A brilliant marriage of Beaux-Arts compositional rationalism, Modern French style and state-of-the-art technology, the slender tower was only sixty-five feet square and rose thirty-seven stories to climax in nobly proportioned lantern. The steel-framed building had a seven-to-one height-to-width ratio, establishing a record that, just prior to its demolition, the editors of Architectural Forum hypothesized might still be unsurpassed. The building was also distinguished by its opulent double-height, marble-clad lobby, which had served several generations as a favorite meeting place” (Stern, Robert A.M., Mellins, Thomas. Fishman, David. New York 1960. Architecture and urbanism between the Second World War and the Bicentennial. New York. The Monacelli Press. Second Edition. 1997. Page 1126).

    The old 47-story Singer Building. July 1908.





    The Singer tower in 1959 from Chase Manhattan Bank building under construction. Photo courtesy of FutureSkyscraper. Skyscrapercity.com




    In June 1967, the Singer Building few months before its demolition. The Singer were small compared with the new and modern offices buildings like Chase Manhattan Bank (center) and the new Marine Midland Building (the black tower at left of Chase tower). Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking northeast. June 1967.




    Stern continues:

    “In 1954, when the Wall Street real estate market was languishing, William Zeckendorf purchased the Singer Tower and adjacent properties to make way for a new building for the New York Stock Exchange. Zeckendorf’s plan fell through, however when the Stock Exchange elected simply to expand to one side of its temple-fronted building on Broad and Wall streets (George B. Post, 1903; addition, Trowbridge & Livingston, 1923). The exchange constructed an undistinguished twenty-two-story office building on the site, replacing two landmark-quality office buildings, the Blair Building (Carrère & Hastings, 1902-3) and the adjacent Commercial Cable Building (Harding & Gooch, 1897). But the Singer Tower’s reprieve was short-lived, is fate sealed when the nearby construction of the World Trade Center in the 1960s sent property values soaring. Despite the objections of Ada Louis Huxtable and others, as well as the suggestion made by editors of Architectural Forum that at least the tower’s lobby be preserved and incorporated into the new building proposed for the site, the city approved demolition. The two-years-old Landmarks Preservation Commission proved inadequate to the task of saving the tower; as Alan Burnham, executive director of the commission, explained: ‘If the building were made a landmark, we would have to find a buyer for it or the city would have to acquire it. The city is not wealthy and the commission doesn’t have a big enough staff to be a real-estate broker for a skyscraper’” (Stern. 1997. Pages 1126-1127).

    He continues to write:

    “Along with the Singer Building, several other buildings, including the imposing thirty-two-story City Investing Building (Francis H. Kimball, 1908), were torn down to clear the two-block site bounded by Church; Cedar and Cortland streets and Broadway for U.S. Steel’s new headquarters: Designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the fifty-four-story building was a particularly graceless steel-and-glass superslab that rose sheer from an austere plaza, whose inclusion allowed for the construction of such an immense building in the first place. What was lost in the demolition of the Singer Tower was not only a vital part of the city’s architectural past but a telling lesson in the humanistic urbanism of the tower-base skyscraper type. Chandeliers from the building’s boardroom, a pathetically small reminder of the Singer Tower’s grandeur, were salvaged and installed in Pratt Institute’s East Building (Stern. 1997. Page 1127).

    Demolition works begun on the Singer Building. July 1967. Photos courtesy of: erbse. Skyscrapercity.com. Link: http://66.249.128.91/showthread.php?t=554835&page=2




    A detail of the French Renaissance style of the top of the Singer Building. July 1967.




    View from the Marine Midland Building's plaza. July 1967.




    Demolition work on the City Investing Building. April 15, 1968. Photo: Landmarks 45. Flickr.com. Link: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landmar...7623378014127/





    Next, a 1968 special of the General Motors Building.


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  9. #174

    Default Manhattan 1960s

    1968 Special

    THE GENERAL MOTORS BUILDING


    A Pre-Postmodern Pionner.


    Hi!! We’re back with this travel trough the history of New York skyscrapers during 20th Century. Now, continuing with the 1960’s we’re begun 1968 with this special about the 52-story white-travertine-marble and black-tinted-glass monolith called the General Motors Building.

    This building, located in 767 Fifth Avenue in the heart of the Plaza District, opposite Grand Army Plaza and Plaza Hotel, was the first skyscraper of more of 50 stories that build in Fifth Avenue since the construction of the 102-story Empire State Building in 1930-1931. It was designed by Edward Durell Stone with association of Emery Roth & Sons and it was built between 1966 and 1968 to replace the old 28-story Savoy Plaza Hotel.

    The 52-story white superslab broke completely the traditional Central Park skyline that until mid 1960’s were dominate by French Renaissance and Art Deco towers of old skyscrapers grand hotels.


    The demolition of Savoy-Plaza Hotel.

    From mid 1920’s until the mid 1960’s the Grand Army Plaza District, Fifth Avenue and 59th Street was famous for its luxury skyscraper hotels. There are the old French Palazzo Plaza Hotel (Henry J. Hardenbergh, 1907), followed by old 1920’s slabs: the 28-story Beaux-Arts style Savoy Plaza Hotel (McKim, Mead & White, 1926-27), the 40-story French Medieval tower of the Sherry-Netherland Hotel (Schultze & Weaver and Buchman & Kahn, 1927-28) and the 42-story Louis XIV style Pierre Hotel (Schultze & Weaver, 1930). The only office building in the zone was the 31-story Art Deco white ziggurat Squibb Building (Buchman & Kahn, 1930).

    The Savoy Plaza was located in Fifth Avenue between East 58th to 59th Streets was one of the most famous New York grand hotels were ever built. But, in autumn 1964 the announcement of this destruction to make way for a 50-story office building for General Motors the city create a painful shock in the city’s preservationist who had lost they fight for save the Pennsylvania Station.

    According with Robert A.M. Stern (1997):

    “The fifty-story building, designed by Eduard Durell Stone in association with Emery Roth & Sons, occupied the full block between Fifty-eight and Fifty-ninth streets, fifth And Madison avenues, replacing, in addition to the Savoy-Plaza, the four-story Emmet Arcade (in which was located a notable Longchamps restaurant), at the southwest corner of Madison Avenue and Fifty-ninth Street, and the fifteen-story Madison Hotel (1919), at the northwest corner of Madison Avenue and Fifty-eight Street. Since 1927 General Motors, the building’s prime tenant, had been leasing space in a building bearing its name at 1775 Broadway, but the company had come to regard the Broadway location as shabby. The English real estate wheeler-dealer Max Rayne, head of London Merchant Securities Ltd., the Savoy-Plaza’s new owner, believed that the city’s hotel market would drastically soften after the closing of the World’s Fair, and felt the moment was opportune for the hotel’s destruction (Stern, Robert A.M., Mellins, Thomas. Fishman, David. New York 1960. Architecture and urbanism between the Second World War and the Bicentennial. New York. The Monacelli Press. Second Edition. 1997. Page 508).



    The Savoy-Plaza (center) from Central Park, looking south. March 1928.




    The Savoy-Plaza Hotel (McKim, Mead & White, 1927). January 1928.







    A view of the Central Park's Plaza District traditional skyscrapers. July 1945.







    The last moments of the Savoy Plaza Hotel. View from Central Park. July 1963.





    Stern continues:

    “Many people were shocked to learn in autumn 1964 that the Savoy Plaza Hotel (McKim, Mead &White, 1927), located on the east side of Fifth Avenue between Fifty-eight and Fifty-nine streets, where it was a part of one of the world’s best-know ensembles, would be torn down to make way for an office building for the General Motors Corporation. In January 1965 a group of women including the novelist Fannie Hurst and Mrs. John A. Warner, the daughter of Alfred E. Smith, formed a preservationist committee called Save Our Landmarks!-Save the Plaza Square. Glenn Fowler later reported in the New York Times that ‘socially prominent women and financially potent women stockholders threatened the $17-billion-a-year giant of American industry with instant destruction unless it abandoned its plan to erect what they called a tombstone in the Savoy Plaza’s stead.’ Here, as the social commentator Roger Starr put it, ‘was a group of ladies not generally considered to be revolutionary’ threatening to ‘abstain from the purchase of Cadillacs’ until a beloved landmark was saved. Nonetheless, the following year the grand hotel way to the wrecker’s ball” (Stern. 1997. Pages 1122-1123).

    In the spring of 1966, the Savoy Plaza Hotel was demolished and the site was cleared by the construction of the new General Motors Building.


    Demolition of the Savoy-Plaza Hotel. 1966. Photo: Yale Joel. LIFE Magazine.




    The design of a modern skyscraper.

    General Motors, in 1964, had its offices in a 27-story Art Deco ziggurat office Building in 1775 Broadway (Shreve Lamb & Harmon, 1927). In 1964 GM announced this intention to build a new 50-story office building in the site of the old Savoy Plaza site, in 767 Fifth Avenue and commissioned to architect Eduard Durell Stone the design of the building in collaboration with Emery Roth & Sons. The definitive design was showed in autumn 1964.

    According with Stern (1997):

    “Although Stone had prepared schematic designs for skyscrapers, including, in the late 1950s preliminary plans for two versions of a proposed twenty-nine-story tower for an undisclosed site on Third Avenue and, earlier, projects for Sixth Avenue and the theater district, he had never building. In December 1964 Stone presented his design, which called for a vertically banded, marble-clad slab emerging from a one-story, site-filling podium and embraced by twenty-one-foot-high wings along the side streets. The slab itself was to rise for a sheer leap of forty-eight stories, vastly outstripping its near neighbors in mass and height- It would also be much brighter: clad in white marble, it would emphasize ‘the salient characteristic of a skyscraper… vertically,’ to become a dominant player on the Central Park skyline, Stone said that he set out ‘to create a building that will salute the skyline and enhance one of New York’s finest neighborhoods,’ a building with ‘the quality of permanence… designed for the future as well as the present and the past.’ Stone believed that white marble was contextually appropriate to the surrounding buildings, many of which, he pointed out, were clad in marble at least on their lower floors. Moreover, he hoped it would ‘start off a new trend toward buildings that look more permanent and have a light color.’ Probably thinking of the new building’s neighbor, CIT, Stone went on to say that ‘those black buildings that have been modish in the past look perfectly horrible.’” (Stern. Pages 508 and 511).

    The critics

    Since this announcement, the Stone’s proposal for the new General Motors Building gave several critics by specialists and architectural journalists that attack the design because its monumental dimensions will drastically alter the Beaux-Arts canons of the Central Park skyline.

    According with Stern (1997):

    “The editors of Progressive Architecture were far lee optimist about Stone’s proposal. They compared its arrival opposite the Plaza Hotel to that of a ‘noveau riche nephew come to visit his genteel relations’ and said that the building would ‘drastically alter one of the city’s few areas of Old World charm.’ They were particularly critical of its lack of contextuality: ‘In a group of sedate older buildings, it is liable to be as conspicuous as Gulliver in Lilliput.’ Its ‘statement of vertical strength,’ they pointed out, was inappropriate ‘in an area whose major statement is not strength but dignity. Its crispness and rigidity are more suited to the corporate parade field of Park Avenue than the formality of the ‘parlor’ where it finds itself’” (Stern. 1997. Page 511).

    Stern continues:

    “By early 1965 the design had been refined and the one-story podium had given way to a 200-by-100-foot plaza along Fifth Avenue, an outdoor room slightly larger than Grand Army Plaza itself, lined with shops on three sides and sunk twelve feel below grade in emulation of the sunken court at the heart of Rockefeller Center. The building was intended to make its mark as a prestigious corporate symbol, but with no sacrifice to bottom-line economics. As Cecilia Benattar, a spokesman for the owners put it, ‘We wanted to carry out the spirit of the new zoning concept. We provided the maximum amount of open space encouraged by the zoning law and this earned us the right to take the maximum amount of interior space allowed’” (Stern. 1997. Fragment).

    The construction

    The demolition of the Savoy-Plaza Hotel beginning in late 1965, after it was close when the World’s Fair were end, in October 1965. The hotel was completely demolished during the spring of 1966 and the site was cleared immediately. The foundations for the new General Motors Building were built during the summer until late 1966. The first steel columns of the new building were put on the site in early 1967. The building begun to rises up during the winter of this year. In April of 1967 the building raises 15 stories. In the middle of May the steel structure reach 25 stories. 35 stories in mid-June. In this month, the steel structure begun to dominate the skyline of Central Park surpassed the towers of Sherry-Netherland and Pierre and Essex House hotels. In late-July 1967 the building raises the 50 stories. In August of 1967 the 52-story steel skeleton of the General Motors Building was topped-out.

    The works for the installation of the marble facade were begun in the late spring of 1967. For the spring of 1968 the building exterior were completed and its first offices were occupied. In the end, the building was opened in autumn of 1968.



    Clearing the site for the General Motors Building. View form the Sherry-Netherland Hotel looking southeast. March 1966.








    In May 1967, the steel skeletor of the General Motors Building rising 34 stories and surpassed the 30-story Squibb Building. Night view looking southeast during a jazz concert on Central Park. May 1967.




    In October of 1967 the 52-story steel structure of the General Motors was topped-out. Aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking south showing the GM Building under construction (foreground). October 1967.






    The General Motors Building under construction as seen from Fifth Avenue and 49th Street. January 1968.





    The building nearing completion from Central Park. April 1968.






    Aerial view of the General Motors Building nearing completion. May 1968.






    A post-modern pioneer.

    The new white monolith of the General Motors Building was opened in late 1968. In the Fifth Avenue lobby of the building were installed a General Motors exhibition room. The visitor can see in the lobby of the building the new 1969 Impala, Chevrolet, Chevelle, Cadillac, Corvette, Camaro and the new Chevrolet Nova. The lobby’s exhibition room was designed by LeRoy Kiefer in the most pure minimalism design and decorated with giant glass ball lamps composed by little glass plates surrounded a big glass ball that contained the lamp.

    The great white slab of the General Motors Building breaks abruptly the skyline of Central Park and was the first skyscraper over 50 stories that build in the district. Few months after of its completion, in 1969 the site behind the Plaza Hotel, on 9 West 57th Street, occupied by low-rises apartment building and slums were cleared for a new 52-story superslab that designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill: The Solow Building. But the history of Solow Building will be treated on other post.

    The General Motors Building is modern and minimalism, but it was a pioneer because its white marble and black glass masonry facade that remember the old lines of late 19th Century and early 20th Century skyscrapers breaking with the canons of International Style Modernism that rules in the 1960s Manhattan skyscrapers, considering with late 1960’s and early 1970s skyscrapers like One Astor Plaza, the World Trade Center and Grace Building, a example of the transition between the International Style Modernism and the Postmodernism.

    According with architecture historian, Eric P. Nash (1999):

    “Stone was a lone voice in the wilderness when he defined the high-modernist orthodoxy of the late 1960s. ‘I am critical of the steel and glass monolithic structures, inspired by Mies,’ he said, ‘particularly the type one finds along Park Avenue now, because I believe architecture should be more permanent in character.’ Stone’s method of making the GM more ‘permanent’ was to return to the skyscraper’s masonry origins in the Chicago School. The GM Building’s three-sided, alternating bays of white marble and black glass recall the oriels of Chicago’s Manhattan Building (William Le baron Jenney, 1891), one of the last great stone-supported tall buildings, and Daniel Burnham’s Flatiron Building. Perhaps top lend an air of modernity, Stone called his glass bays ‘vision panels,’ and pointed out their energy efficiency. Because the bays provided views up and down the avenue, Stone said that they ‘give the occupant of each office a welcome sense of individuality.’ Oddly, the paper-white slab resembles nothing so much as that icon of 1960s impersonality, the IBM punch card” (Nash, Eric P. Manhattan Skyscrapers. New York. Princeton Architectural Press. 1999. Page 123).

    Nash (1999) continues:

    “Stone’s problem was that the single-handedly tried to find a way out of the glass box that modernist built itself into, without post-modernism’s theoretical apparatus of discontinuity and pastiche. The GM is a failed offshoot because Stone tried to incorporate historicism into modernism’s unyielding mold, rather than to explore and celebrate the discontinuities, as later architects did. Stone wandered into increasingly idiosyncratic, filigreed masonry designs and his career remain in critical neglect” (Nash. 1999. Fragment).


    The General Motors Building (Edward Durell Stone and Emery Roth & Sons. 1968). View of the new building from Central Park. May 1968.




    View of the building from Central Park South. September 1970. Photo: Ezra Stoller.




    A Color view of the building. 1970.




    Aerial view of the General Motors Building. October 1968



    The Plaza

    The Sunken Plaza of General Motors Building was paved with marble and consists in an explanade one floor below the street level and emulates the Rockefeller Center’s Lower Plaza. But it was located in the opposite of Grand Army Plaza and its modernity was criticized by the specialists and preservationists.

    Stern (1997) said that New York Times architectural criticism, Ada Louis Huxtable, was an extremely to criticize the General Motors’ plaza:

    “Huxtable was now extremely critical of the design she had earlier praised: ‘Its contribution to the rape of the [Grand Army] plaza is a clear demonstration of how the new zoning, like the old zoning, is to be used exclusively as a tool for profit.’ She went on the describe the folly of the building’s plaza, its most egregious urban design failure: ‘To achieve the most bulk possible under the new law, it will have an open plaza facing the existing plaza. Even heard of a redundant plaza? This is it. Something like having two heads. Not only does it provide extra space at the one spot in New York where it is not needed, but it breaks the building line where enclosure is desirable.’ Nor was Huxtable pleased by the piazzetta formed along Madison Avenue, because, she said, the avenue’s ‘best feature, urbanistically, is the intimacy of its small, closely connected, luxurious specially shops that unroll the treasures of the world for the pedestrian. Why destroy that scale and continuity?’ (Stern. 1997. Pages 511-512).

    Perhaps, the unpopularity of the General Motors Building’s plaza took effect in the late 1990’s: in 1999, the new GM Building (now know as 767 Fifth Avenue Building) owner, Donald Trump demolished the plaza and covered it with a new street-level austere plaza. Finally, between 2005 and 2006 the building’s plaza was redesigned and rebuilt and in the center was create a big minimalist glass cube in that interior had open a hole that in its interior was stablished a new Apple computers store. The glass cube of the plaza is decorated by a big gray Apple’s logo.

    The General Motors Building and its plaza. July 1968.




    Aerial view of the General Motors with its plaza. April 1970.




    Night view of the building from Central Park. July 1968.




    Night view of the General Motors Building from RCA Building. January 1970.





    Next, a general panorama of 1968.


    Your opinion is important. If you have a commentary of want to post a picture about Manhattan during 20th Century, please show here, in this post.

    Thank You!!!
    Last edited by erickchristian; July 15th, 2010 at 07:53 PM.

  10. #175

    Default Manhattan 1960s

    1968

    Hello!! we're back again with this travel trough the history of the skyscrapers of the World's skyscraper capital: New York. Now, continuing our trip through the 1960s, we show a general panorama of the city skyline in 1968, an explosive year in overall sides:

    Student protest in all sides of the world: student disturbs in Paris in May, who was supported by workers and universities. A ephimeral democracy in Czechoslovakia's capital, Praga, that was eliminated by Soviet army. Many student protest against USA intervetion in Vietnam in many American cities, meanly New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Washington D.C. Student disturbs during the National Democratic Convention in Chicago, on August 1968. Bloody events made by Mexican goverment against College students during a Mexican colleges protest demostration for democracy in Plaza de la Tres Culturas, in Tlatelolco, Mexico City in October 2, 1968, few days before the opening of the Olympic Games.

    The asassination of black rights leader Martin Luther King II and the presidential Democrate candidate Robert Kennedy.

    The climax of Hippie movement and psychedellic. 1968 is the year of hippie musical "HAIR".

    Creepy atrocities by US Navy against vietnamese population.

    Increassing the war in Middle Orient between arabs and israelites.

    In New York in its skyscraper architecture, entire Manhattan live a climax moment of the office building boom that begun in the 1950s. Many offices building were completed and many more others was to be rises changing Manhattan skyline, but that construction activity begun to created a over-offering of ofice space and in these moment, many great companies beugn to move into suburbs. New York begun to live a great fiscal crisis that relfected in the shortage of money for public developments.

    Many offices building was completed and open during 1968:
    • 52-story General Motors Building in 767 Fifth Avenue between East 58th to 59th Streets (Edward Durell Stone and Emery Roth & Sons).
    • 29-story Two Pennsylvania Plaza and Madison Square Garden, in the site of the old Pennsylvania Station.
    • 28-story First National City Bank Building in Franklyn Delano Roosevelt Drive and Wall Street.
    • 33-story 909 Third Avenue Building.
    • 20-story Four New York Plaza Building.
    • 13-story Ford Foundation Building.
    Other buildings were under construction during 1968
    • 55-story Burlington House Building on Sixth Avenue between West 54th to 55th Streets.
    • 50-story 345 Park Avenue Building.
    • 45-story Bankers Trust Annex Building.
    • 45-story 1133 Sixth Avenue Building.
    • 50-story One New York Plaza
    • 42-story One Battery Park Plaza
    • 45-story 1700 Broadway Building
    • 42-story 1414 Broadway Building
    • 47-story Random House Building
    • 30-story 100 Wall Street Building (excavation and the structure begun to rises during the summer of 1968).
    • 110-story World Trade Center Twin Towers (The North Tower begun to rises in autumn 1968 while excavation work continue for South Tower and other buildings).
    • 36-story Architects and Designers Building in Lexington Avenue and southeast corner of 58th Street.
    While, construction activity begun for the next buildings that schedulled to be completed until 1970 and 1972.
    • 54-story One Astor Plaza at 1515 Broadway (excavation).
    • 55-story Standard Oil Headquartes Building (Exxon Building or Building "X") in Rockefeller Center (excavation).
    • 51-story new McGraw-Hill Headquarters Building (Building "Y") in Rockefeller Center (demolition of existing buildings and excavation).
    • 55-story One Liberty Plaza (demolition of Singer Building that be completed in summer 1968 and excavation works begun in autumn).
    • 55-story 55 Water Street complex (demolition of existing buildings included the old 1913 Seamen Church Institute Building).
    • 42-story Two New York Plaza (excavation).
    • 55-story Uris Plaza at Broadway between West 50th to 51st Streets (demolition of existing buildings included the old Capitol Theatre).
    • 45-story 810 Seventh Avenue Building (demolition of existing buildings and excavation).
    • 50-story 888 Seventh Avenue Building (demolition of existing buildings and excavation).
    • 45-story Gulf & Western Building at Columbus Circle (excavation).
    • 52-story 919 Third Avenue Building (excavation).

    Next, a general panorama of 1968.

    View of a street scene on Fifth Avenue and 49th Street with the General Motors Building under construction at background. January 1968.




    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking north showing the Two New York Plaza and Citibank Buildings under construction (right). January 1968.




    A detail of the dark-brown aluminum and glass facade of Marine Midland Building as seen from Equitable Building with the Woolworth Building at left. January 1968.

  11. #176

    Default Manhattan 1960s

    1968

    Hello!! we're back again with this travel trough the history of the skyscrapers of the World's skyscraper capital: New York. Now, continuing our trip through the 1960s, we show a general panorama of the city skyline in 1968, an explosive year in overall sides:

    Student protest in all sides of the world: student disturbs in Paris in May, who was supported by workers and universities. A ephimeral democracy in Czechoslovakia's capital, Praga, that was eliminated by Soviet army. Many student protest against USA intervetion in Vietnam in many American cities, meanly New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Washington D.C. Student disturbs during the National Democratic Convention in Chicago, on August 1968. Bloody events made by Mexican goverment against College students during a Mexican colleges protest demostration for democracy in Plaza de la Tres Culturas, in Tlatelolco, Mexico City in October 2, 1968, few days before the opening of the Olympic Games.

    The asassination of black rights leader Martin Luther King II and the presidential Democrate candidate Robert Kennedy.

    The climax of Hippie movement and psychedellic. 1968 is the year of hippie musical "HAIR".

    Creepy atrocities by US Navy against vietnamese population.

    Increassing the war in Middle Orient between arabs and israelites.

    In New York in its skyscraper architecture, entire Manhattan live a climax moment of the office building boom that begun in the 1950s. Many offices building were completed and many more others was to be rises changing Manhattan skyline, but that construction activity begun to created a over-offering of ofice space and in these moment, many great companies beugn to move into suburbs. New York begun to live a great fiscal crisis that relfected in the shortage of money for public developments.





    Many offices building was completed and open during 1968:
    • 52-story General Motors Building in 767 Fifth Avenue between East 58th to 59th Streets (Edward Durell Stone and Emery Roth & Sons).
    • 29-story Two Pennsylvania Plaza and Madison Square Garden, in the site of the old Pennsylvania Station.
    • 28-story First National City Bank Building in Franklyn Delano Roosevelt Drive and Wall Street.
    • 33-story 909 Third Avenue Building.
    • 20-story Four New York Plaza Building.
    • 13-story Ford Foundation Building.
    Other buildings were under construction during 1968
    • 55-story Burlington House Building on Sixth Avenue between West 54th to 55th Streets.
    • 50-story 345 Park Avenue Building.
    • 45-story Bankers Trust Annex Building.
    • 45-story 1133 Sixth Avenue Building.
    • 50-story One New York Plaza
    • 42-story One Battery Park Plaza
    • 45-story 1700 Broadway Building
    • 42-story 1414 Broadway Building
    • 47-story Random House Building
    • 30-story 100 Wall Street Building (excavation and the structure begun to rises during the summer of 1968).
    • 110-story World Trade Center Twin Towers (The North Tower begun to rises in autumn 1968 while excavation work continue for South Tower and other buildings).
    • 36-story Architects and Designers Building in Lexington Avenue and southeast corner of 58th Street.
    • 36-story Cooper-Bergstein Building in Broadway between East 31st and 32nd Streets.
    While, construction activity begun for the next buildings that schedulled to be completed until 1970 and 1972.
    • 54-story One Astor Plaza at 1515 Broadway (excavation).
    • 55-story Standard Oil Headquartes Building (Exxon Building or Building "X") in Rockefeller Center (excavation).
    • 51-story new McGraw-Hill Headquarters Building (Building "Y") in Rockefeller Center (demolition of existing buildings and excavation).
    • 55-story One Liberty Plaza (demolition of Singer Building that be completed in summer 1968 and excavation works begun in autumn).
    • 55-story 55 Water Street complex (demolition of existing buildings included the old 1913 Seamen Church Institute Building).
    • 42-story Two New York Plaza (excavation).
    • 55-story Uris Plaza at Broadway between West 50th to 51st Streets (demolition of existing buildings included the old Capitol Theatre).
    • 45-story 810 Seventh Avenue Building (demolition of existing buildings and excavation).
    • 50-story 888 Seventh Avenue Building (demolition of existing buildings and excavation).
    • 45-story Gulf & Western Building at Columbus Circle (excavation).
    • 52-story 919 Third Avenue Building (excavation).
    Next, a general panorama of 1968.

    View of a street scene on Fifth Avenue and 49th Street with the General Motors Building under construction at background. January 1968.




    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking north showing the Two New York Plaza and Citibank Buildings under construction (right). January 1968.




    A detail of the dark-brown aluminum and glass facade of Marine Midland Building as seen from Equitable Building with the Woolworth Building at left. January 1968.




    Night view of the new Ford Foundation Building (Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo). View to the west showing the Chrysler Building. February 1968. Photo: Ezra Stoller.




    Aerial view of Manhattan Island looking northwest. March 1968.




    Aerial view of the new Madison Square Garden Sports Center and the new 29-story Two Pennsylvania Plaza Building. April 1968.




    Lower Manhattan's Financial District looking west from Brooklyn harbor. April 1968.




    Midtown Manhattan looking northeast from Empire State Building. April 1968.




    The General Motor Building nearing completion as seen from Central Park. April 1968.




    Night view of the new Madison Square Garden Sports Center and the new 29-story Two Pennsylvania Plaza Building. April 1968. These buildings were built in the site of the old Pennsylvania Station.




    The twin towers of 860 and 870 United Nations Plaza (Harrison & Abramovitz, 1965) from United Nations gardens looking north. May 1968.




    Aerial view of the new 52-story General Motors Building nearby completion. View looking northwest showing Central Park. May 1968.




    Aerial view of the new Madison Square Garden Sports Center and Two Penn Plaza. View looking northeast showing the Empire State Buildingand Midtown Manhattan's Grand Central District (background). May 1968.





    Lower Manhattan's Financial District skyline looking west from Brooklyn Harbor. May 1968.




    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan's Financial District looking west from East River with a montage of the 55 Water Street Project. May 1968. Photo: Skyviews Aerial Surveys. From ARCHITECTURAL RECORD MAGAZINE. April 1969.




    Aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking west from East River showing the United Nations. May 1968.




    The New Look for a traditional skyline. The new 52-story General Motors Building as seen from Central Park. The new building now dominates the Central Park skyline. May 1968.




    The Ford Foundation Building. May 1968. Photo: Ezra Stoller.




    Skyscrapers of Second and Third Generation together in Park Avenue: the old Art Deco Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and the new modern 299 Park Avenue Building. May 1968.




    Aerial view of the Empire State Building. View looking south showing the 36 story Cooper-Bergstein Building (Shreve, Lamb & Harmon) under construction. June 1968.




    Midtown Manhattan skyline looking west from a Queens cementery. June 1968.




    Evening view of the Grand Army Plaza's skyscrapers from Central Park with the new General Motors Building. July 1968. Photo: Sardoya.




    The General Motors Building as seen from the Plaza Hotel looking east. July 1968.




    Lower Manhattan's West Side Highway skyscrapers as seen from Battery Park City landfill. July 1968. Photo: Hideaki Sato.





    The United Nations Building from East River. View looking southwest showing Midtown skyline. July 1968.




    Night view of Park Avenue looking south from 52nd Street. July 1968.




    Lower Manhattan's Financial District skyscrapers looking east from Battery Park City landfill. July 1968. Photo. Hideaki Sato.




    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking northeast showing the new One New York Plaza building under construction (right). August 1968.




    Night view of Times Square. August 1968.




    Lower Manhattan's new skyline looking north from Staten Island Ferry. The building under construction at right of the picture is the One New York Plaza. September 1968. Photo: Hideaki Sato.




    Lower Manhattan skyline as far from Staten Island Ferry. September 1968. Photo: Hideaki Sato.



    Night view of Midtown Manhattan looking south from RCA Building. September 1968. The skyscraper under construction that seen at far right is the new 45-story 1133 Avenue of the Americas Building.




    Symbol of modernity: A helichopter flying over Manhattan. October 1968.




    Aerial view of the new General Motors Building. October 1968.




    Aerial view of Midtown Manhattan looking northeast showing Central Park (left). The buildings under construction of the center of the picture is the 55-story Burlington House Building and 45-story 1700 Broadway Building respectively. The sites that be clearing in the bottom of the picture is the site for the new Exxon and McGraw-Hill Buildings for a new Rockefeller Center expansions. The Rockefeller Center appear on the center of the picture. The General Motors Building appear on the background, above Central Park. October 1968.



    Wall Street skyscrapers as seen looking south from South Bridge Towers construction site. October 1968. Photo: Hideaki Sato.





    Another perspective. October 1968. Photo: Hideaki Sato.





    Midtown Manhattan skyline looking east from Century Towers. October 1968.



    Midtown Manhattan looking west from Queens. October 1968. Photo: Hideaki Sato.




    Night view of Wall Street skyscraper from construction site for South Bridge Towers. October 1968. Photo: Hideaki Sato.





    Skating in Central Park. The General Motors Building appears in background. November 1968.




    Night view of Midtown Manhattan looking north from Empire State Building. The new 45-story 1133 Avenue of the Americas Building, nearby completion, appears on the extreme left of the picture. The Rockefeller Center appears at center. November 1968.




    Next, a 1969 Special dedicated to One New York Plaza.

    Your opinion is important. If you have a commentary of want to post a picture about Manhattan during 20th Century, please show here, in this post.

    Thank You!!!
    Last edited by erickchristian; July 15th, 2010 at 07:48 PM.

  12. #177

    Default

    Erick, you're a treasure; where do you find all of these fantastic images? Thanks again for another great post.

  13. #178

    Default

    The most part of the pictures of this thread I was scanned from my personal book collection. I have many books about New York City, from 1920s to Today. Many of these books I was acquired from many old book shops along Donceles Street, at Mexico City's Historic Center since 2001. I founded really theasures in these old book shops.

    The most new books that I collected I bought in book shops like Gandhi Bookstore. The Robert A.M Stern book that I used on my articles and many pictures, New York 1960. Architecture and Urbanism between the Second World War and the Bicentennial, I was acquired from Internet mexican e-store in 2005.


    Other pictures was from many books that I was used, was get thanks to the courtesy of Benjamin Franklyn Library and National Autonomy University of Mexico's (UNAM) Central Library.


    The books that I used for this thread is, for example:


    LIFE Magazine spanish edition from 1960's that I was collected from 1998 to today.
    Hideaki Sato's 2001 book, Requiem for World Trade Center
    Architectural Record Magazine from 1950s to 1970s.
    The New York I Love.
    National Geographic Magazine from 1950's to 1970's
    TIME & LIFE books: The Engineer, World Cities: New York.
    And overall: few 1960s and 1970s Manhattan Postcards Company souvenirs books and postcards of New York City.


    and more, include many Spanish encyclopedias.


    Thanks.
    Last edited by erickchristian; May 3rd, 2010 at 11:13 AM.

  14. #179

    Default

    What an awful time. Monstrous new buildings rising, all those parking lots, and almost no trees outside of parks.

  15. #180

    Default Manhattan 1960s

    1969 Special

    One New York Plaza, Burlington House and 345 Park Avenue buildings.





    Three banal supertowers

    Hello!!! we’re back again with this travel through the history of New York skyscrapers. Now, continuing with the 1960s, begun 1969 with this special dedicated to three skyscrapers that was considered on late 1960s banal by their architectural criticisms, but forty one years of their inauguration, the architecture of the three towers is modern.

    These skyscrapers is the 50-story One New York Plaza, on financial district, the 44-story 345 Park Avenue Building and 50-story Burlington House Building, in 1345 Sixth Avenue, both towers were inaugurated during 1969.

    One New York Plaza: the waffle iron tower.

    First talking about the One New York Plaza, a 55-story glass and silver and black aluminum building was designed by William Lescaze in association with Kahn & Jacobs (One New York Plaza was the last skyscraper that be designed by Lescaze in New York) and its construction begun during the summer 1967 and it was completed during the summer of 1969, but it was not opened by the business until late 1969. This building was the first of four buildings that be changed dramatically the shape of the east shoreline of Lower Manhattan and the second of a complex of three buildings that be completed between 1968 and 1972.

    Cause its monumentally (50 stories that be distributed in 2.3 million square foot for office space) and this location on the east shoreline of Lower Manhattan, opposite Staten Island Ferry Terminal and Battery Park, the One New York Plaza was hardly criticized for architectural specialist who was considered that the building was destroyed the classical triangular shape of Lower Manhattan Skyline, destruction that be completed with the construction of World Trade Center towers. The One New York Plaza was considered anti-aesthetic, ugly and aggressive with other buildings.

    The anti-aesthetic of the One New York Plaza, according with architectural criticisms was on the prefabricated elements of the façade of the building. According with Robert A.M. Stern (1997):

    “Designed under the direction of Nevio Maggiora, the façade of One New York Plaza consisted of an absolutely regular grid of ten-by-twelve-foot prefabricated aluminum-and-glass panels. The building was popularly known, according with Ada Louise Huxtable, ‘as the waffle iron of barber shop building ceilings at a massively blown up scale.’ To Paul Goldberger, the façade looked like ‘fifty stories of Otis elevator buttoms (or blank TV screens),’ and to Norval White and Elliot Willensky, the panels were just so many ‘interior decorators’ picture frames.’ At the corners, the air-conditioning risers were designed to create a visual frame, which was concluded at the top by a ‘cornice’ housing an exclusive dining club. The building’s bulk and uniformity made it the most prominent if not the most distinguished new building to rise along the hitherto low-scale East River landscape” (Stern, Robert A.M., Mellins, Thomas. Fishman, David. New York 1960. Architecture and urbanism between the Second World War and the Bicentennial. New York. The Monacelli Press. Second Edition. 1997. Pages 182-183).

    Aerial view of Lower Manhattan looking north showing the One New York Plaza under construction. May 1969.




    The One New York Plaza nearby completion rises behind the new Four New York Plaza building (foreground). August 1969. Photo: Ezra Stoller.




    The One New York Plaza (William Lescaze & Associates with Kahn & Jacobs, 1969). View showing the new Lower Manhattan skyline. September 1969.




    The 1970 One New York Plaza’s fire: a 9-11 prelude.

    In August 5, 1970 the One New York Plaza was killed two people and injured thirty-five, “raised serious questions about whether prevailing buildings, particularly those with large office buildings (Stern. 1997. Page 183). Question that be revived thirty-one years after with the collapse of the World Trade Center Twin Towers on September 11, 2001.

    According with Architectural Record Magazine, in September 1970:

    “A fire last month in Manhattan’s 1 New York Plaza killed two, injured 35, and raised serious questions about building codes. The Fire Department blamed hard-to-open, nearly unbreakable windows for their great difficulty in putting the fire out. Temperatures roses to an estimated 2000 degrees (Fahrenheit, or 1093.3 Celsius), allegedly twisting beams and melting fixtures because heat could not escape. Emergency device in the building in the building, designed by William Lescaze and Associates, functioned; but the firefighters (27 of the injured were firemen) claimed these weren’t enough. The building was not required to and did not contain a sprinkler system. However, it met local codes in every way” (Skyscraper fire raises questions. In Architectural Record. September 1970. Page 36.

    Fire at One New York Plaza. August 5, 1970. Photo: Carl Schmitt. ARCHITECTURAL RECORD Magazine. September 1970.




    The building under repair. Aerial view of Lower Manhattan. October 1970.




    The 345 Park Avenue Building: A Seagram’s parody.

    The next banal skyscraper that completed in 1969 is the 345 Park Avenue Building. The 44-story precast-concrete and glass building was designed by Emery Roth & Sons. This building was considered banal for the architecture criticisms for two reasons: first, the construction of the building implicated the demolition of the old 23-story Beaux-Arts style Hotel Ambassador; second, the new building was designed emulating many elements of the Seagram Building, overall, in the design of the plaza because really, 345 Park Avenue Building’s facade design and slab is totally different than Seagram.

    According with Stern (1997) the 345 Park Avenue:

    “… occupying the block bounded by Park and Lexington Avenues, Fifty-first and Fifty-second streets, previously home to the Hotel Ambassador (Warren & Weltmore, 1921) as well as a number of townhouses and tenements. The twenty-fifth office to rise on Park Avenue since 1946 and the fourteen to have been designed by the Roth firm, it was not a version of Seagram’s but a forty-four-story slab modified at its base by a vestigial five-story element projecting forward to within twenty-five feet of the Park Avenue building line on the Fifty-second Street side. This element was intended not only to complete the closure of the 23,000-square-foot plaza formed at the Fifty-first Street corner but also provide appropriate closure and low height opposite the Seagram plaza to the north. While he was working on the Seagram design, Mies had hopped that the Ambassador would ‘build a whole new wing of rooms to look out’ on his plaza, thereby creating an approximately seventy-story ‘palisade.’ But as built, the low wing of 345 Park robbed the northbound pedestrian coming upon the Seagram plaza of that extraordinary sensation of spatial release that had thrilled Phyllis Lambert from the very earliest stages of the design. The Roths did, however, make other attempts to defer to the Seagram Building: they kept their slab back from Park Avenue in line with Mies’s tower and, in a departure from the dark colors adopted by many architects in emulation of the Seagram Building, they clad their building in buff-colored precast concrete, the rough texture and lightness of which helped reinforce the distinctiveness of Seagram” (Stern. 1997. Pages 355, 357).

    45-story 345 Park Avenue Building (Emery Roth & Sons, 1967-1969). View from RCA Building looking east. July 1969.




    The Burlington House Building: A black box for Sixth Avenue

    In mid 1969 the Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue) had its first black skyscraper: the 55-story Burlington House Building. The new 50-story dark-gray-tinted glass and black aluminum curtain-wall skyscraper was designed by Emery Roth & Sons and located on 1345 Avenue of the Americas between west 54th to 55th Streets was considered banal for two reasons:

    The Burlington House Building was designed on the same style like another Roth’s black boxes: the 45-story 299 Park Avenue Building (1965-1967) and the Burroughs Building in Third Avenue and east 39th to 40th Streets. But, its design is more elegant and one of the most successful of the Roth’s skyscrapers and today it is considered too modern.

    The building was severally criticized because it was built on the site of the old Art Deco Ziegfeld Theatre (Joseph Urban, 1927). The old theatre was legendary because it was the home of the famous Ziegfeld Follies’ girl dancers. The theatre, considered a landmark by many New Yorkers was demolished in 1966 to make way to new Burlington House tower and finally, when the new building were completed, in 1969, the Ziegfeld was move to a new a less spectacular movie theater behind the new tower.

    According with Robert A.M. Stern (1997):

    “Emery Roth & Sons’ 1.5 million-square-foot Burlington House (1969), a fifty-story building at 1345 Avenue of the Americas, on the west blockfront between Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth streets, replaced Joseph Urban’s Ziegfeld Theater of 1927. Burlington, the textile firm, was the principal tenant on fourteen of the blockbuster building’s floors. A sheer tower clad in glass tinted dark gray, Burlington House sat behind a block-long plaza facing Sixth Avenue, ornamented by two reflecting pools, each holding a golf-ball-like sphere that sent out streams of water. To its west, a midblock passageway separated the tower from a new 1,151-seat movie theater, the Ziegfeld, the first such large capacity built since Radio City Music Hall. Just south of the building’s main lobby was the Mill, a promotional exhibition sponsored by Burlington and designed by Chermayeff & Geismar, the graphic and exhibition design firm. The exhibition occupying three floors, was divided into three sections –the first showing the raw materials used in textile production; the second focusing on the machines that did the weaving; and the third displaying the products themselves –all presented on sixty-nine rear-screen slide projectors flashing hundreds of images on different-sized screens. Visitors passed from phase to phase on the longest moving walkway east of the Mississippi” (Stern, 1997. Page 415-416).

    The Burlington House Building at 1345 Avenue of the Americas. (Emery Roth & Sons, 1969). October 1970. Photo: Wurts.




    Now, a general panorama of 1969.

    Your opinion is important. If you have a commentary of want to post a picture about Manhattan during 20th Century, please show here, in this post.

    Thank You!!!









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