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Thread: Museums

  1. #16

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    ^ I concur.

  2. #17

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    Dtolman: so you have been to the ones in London? what did you think of them? Went to one recently at the London Design Museum where one of favourite artists is exhibiting. Have you heard of Tom Dixon - recently his been setting a trend of producing eco-friendly products. Check out what is doing at the Super Contemporary exhibition: http://www.supercontemporary.co.uk/?s=tom-dixon ...who are your favourite artists?

  3. #18
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    Hi,
    Its been a number of years since I went to London last, but I hit all the major museums and was very impressed (I thought the Met's near east/egyptian collection was big - was blown away by the British museum).

    My tastes in art leans towards...representational. That leaves out most critically acclaimed artists from the past century. So most of the artists I like are either current regional artists I follow in local galleries, or classic greats of yesteryear (El Greco, Winslow Homer, Thomas Moran, Louis Comfort Tiffany, Van Gogh, Monet, etc, etc).

  4. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by dtolman View Post
    Hi,
    Its been a number of years since I went to London last, but I hit all the major museums and was very impressed (I thought the Met's near east/egyptian collection was big - was blown away by the British museum).

    My tastes in art leans towards...representational. That leaves out most critically acclaimed artists from the past century. So most of the artists I like are either current regional artists I follow in local galleries, or classic greats of yesteryear (El Greco, Winslow Homer, Thomas Moran, Louis Comfort Tiffany, Van Gogh, Monet, etc, etc).
    London is home to over 250 museums, and four United Nations Heritage sites. London's world famous museums include The British Museum, The Natural History Museum, The Science Museum, The Victoria and Albert Museum and the Imperial War Museum. There are however numereous excellent musuems, art galleries and other cultual centres throughout London.

    http://www.chr.org.uk/museums.htm

    http://www.visitlondon.com/attractio.../major-museums

    http://www.londonnet.co.uk/ln/guide/about/museums.html

    http://www.mlalondon.org.uk/uploads/...cts_&_figs.pdf


    UNESCO World Heritage sites London

    The Tower of London

    Westminster Abbey, The Palace of Westminster and St. Margaret's Church

    Greenwich Maritime Centre

    The Royal Botanical Gardens Kew.

    London's Museums are also investing heavily with the new Darwin Centre at the Natural History Museum, the planned extension to the British Museum, a planned extension to the Greenwich Maritime Library and a major new scheme recently announced by the Science Museum.

    http://www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3142439



    Last edited by Codex; October 7th, 2009 at 12:07 PM.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    Three superb bite-size museums, each in splendid settings:

    1. Frick Collection: as many top drawer paintings as the Metropolitan without having to wade through the lesser stuff. Check out especially the El Greco and the Ingres. 70th street at Fifth Avenue.

    Is this a joke? Have you been to the Met?

    I adore The Frick too, but it ain't the Met.

  6. #21
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    Default Alice Austen House, Rosebank, Staten Island

    And for Compensation, the View


    BEACHCOMBER
    Paul Moakley photographs the beach below his home in the Rosebank section of Staten Island.

    By CONSTANCE ROSENBLUM

    TRUTH be told, life at the Alice Austen House in the Rosebank section of Staten Island was considerably livelier in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when Austen, one of America’s earliest and most prolific photographers, ruled the roost.

    Audio Slide Show


    HARBORSIDE Paul Moakley is the resident caretaker of the Alice Austen House, once the home of a pioneering photographer.


    A photographer and photo editor himself, he has a tiny apartment on the top floor of the Gothic- Revival-style building.


    It was from this Gothic-Revival-style house that she used to take off on her bicycle, laden with 50 pounds of equipment, to photograph fishmongers, bootblacks and other working people. It was on the front lawn that she used to dance wildly with her female friends. Even more scandalous, she took pictures of herself with a cigarette stuck in her mouth.

    The house became a museum in 1985. It is owned by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, and visited by 8,000 people a year.

    But if Austen, who died in 1952 at the age of 86, were still in evidence, she might be happy that something of a kindred spirit is ensconced in her old home. She might be happy that Paul Moakley is serving as the museum’s full-time caretaker and curator and living in the snug little apartment on the top floor.

    Mr. Moakley, 33, a photographer and freelance photo editor, can gaze through the diamond-paned dormer windows as tankers and cruise ships glide in and out of the harbor. He can watch hawks and cardinals as he washes dishes in the kitchen, a space as compact as a ship’s galley and with appropriately slanting floorboards.

    Mr. Moakley, who is dark-haired and soft-spoken, is a child of the island through and through. His family moved here from Queens when he was 13 months old, and the day after graduating from college, he and two friends rented a century-old house on Bay Street, just up the road from the museum, which is at 2 Hylan Boulevard.

    “It was the oldest, most decrepit house I could find,” Mr. Moakley said the other day, sitting on the living room sofa amid great quantities of his photographic paraphernalia. “I’d grown up in a duplex and I always hated it. I thought it was flimsy, and there was no privacy. It was definitely not cozy.”

    Mr. Moakley did something else that day after graduation, something that would help determine the course of his future. He got a job as a photo editor at a magazine called PDN (the initials stand for Photo District News). The job was the first step in a series of positions in the field.

    It was not an easy choice of profession, in part because when Mr. Moakley was growing up, he had no exposure to anyone who shared his interest in this world.

    “Everyone in my family worked in construction,” he explained. “I didn’t know anyone who had a nice camera.”

    In 2003, he curated of a pair of photography exhibitions at the Austen museum, and in the process got to know members of the staff. In October of 2005, when the previous caretaker left, Mr. Moakley was asked to move in. His four-room space includes the room where a family of servants lived and the bedroom occupied for a time by Austen’s Aunt Minn and Uncle Oswald, the man who gave Alice her first camera.

    The furnishings are largely hand-me-downs, among them the worn wooden dresser from Mr. Moakley’s grandparents. What makes the apartment memorable are the period architectural details — the sharply angled ceilings, the secret cupboards, the built-in shelves and cabinets, the bookcases with glass doors, the wide floorboards.

    On the white walls hang vintage photographs of Mr. Moakley’s family along with works by contemporary photographers and a huge silk-screen of a sunset that Mr. Moakley’s father, who liked to rescue discarded art from the buildings where he worked, found in an empty office.

    The light in the apartment seems to have a life of its own. The sun that streams through the unshuttered windows is so brilliant, Mr. Moakley sometimes has to move his bed to one side to avoid being awakened at the crack of dawn. As the sun travels across the sky, he says, each room is beautiful in a different way.

    In exchange for living here rent free, Mr. Moakley is responsible for providing security, handling emergencies and spending one day a week taking care of the house and its grounds.

    He vacuums. He dusts. He polishes the furniture, washes the windows, paints over scratches on the walls and nails down loose floorboards. He sets out humane traps baited with peanut butter sandwiches in an effort to catch the squirrels that make a mess of the attic.

    Yet being from a family of construction workers has its advantages, so much so that even the most complicated maintenance tasks come easily to him.

    “I’m not afraid of tools,” he explained. “In the house where I grew up, if something was broken, we’d all sit around and watch my father fix it.”

    This life wouldn’t suit everyone. “There’s always something to be done,” he explained. “Raking the leaves. Shoveling the snow. Getting the garden ready for planting. Planning the next exhibition. You can never lie on the couch and feel that everything is done.”

    Privacy is another issue. Sometimes Mr. Moakley comes home to find a stranger standing in his living room, a visitor to the museum who has taken a wrong turn and accidentally wandered up the narrow staircase that leads to the second floor.
    But the upsides are considerable, a major one being that the apartment, while small, is eminently suitable for entertaining. This is largely thanks to the porch that extends out from the bedroom onto an amazing view of the bay.
    In Austen’s day, the house was called Clear Comfort. Mr. Moakley’s friends call it Camp Comfort and often arrive with bags of food, happy to hang out there for the weekend and in good weather dine alfresco.

    “We’ll come to Camp Comfort, and you’ll cook,” they announce cheerfully to Mr. Moakley, and he does just that, sometimes whipping up Mediterranean dishes using recipes he learned from his days working as a waiter at an island restaurant called Aesop’s Tables.

    “It’s like having a little bed-and-breakfast,” he said of the setup. “But I’m lucky it’s so nice. I’m not sure people would come otherwise.”

    Although Mr. Moakley’s appointment is open ended, he realizes that his time here will not last forever.

    “As much as this is my home,” he explained, “I know that I’m just Austen’s caretaker.”

    And when those days are over?

    “I’ll most likely be living in an apartment like everyone else,” Mr. Moakley said. “Though I’ll probably stay on Staten Island and watch the other guy rake the leaves.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/20/re...html?ref=style

  7. #22
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    Default Museum of the American Gangster

    An offer you can't refuse! Museum of the American Gangster is outta this underworld

    BY Joe Neumaier

    March 4th 2010


    Lorcan Otway holds a Tommy gun and a bottle in the museum that's set to open in the spring.

    A once-infamous speakeasy, where mobsters ruled and booze flowed when Prohibition made it illegal, has an offer you can't refuse.

    Welcome to the Museum of the American Gangster.

    Built inside the old Theatre 80 space on St. Marks Place, it opens for previews Sunday. But the East Village rowhouse is already part of the city's storied underworld history.

    Gangster Walter Scheib ran it in the 1920s as a speakeasy that you entered by going through an alley and a secret door that took you to a back room.

    There, it didn't matter that the 18th Amendment had banned alcohol.
    "One of the things that makes this place very New York is it's a living history," says owner and co-curator Lorcan Otway.

    A teenage Frank Sinatra even sang for his supper here as a crooning waiter.

    In the '60s it became the Termini brothers' Jazz Gallery club, where John Coltrane's quartet first played and Lord Richard Buckley's cabaret card was seized.

    "This museum is a part of the real world, with real stories," Otway said. "You can get your hands dirty here."

    When Otway's dad, Howard, bought 80 St. Marks from Scheib in 1964, he found two safes inside and decided it was smarter to let Scheib know than open them himself.

    It turned out there was $2 million in gold currency inside.

    When the gangster museum is fully up and running in the spring, it'll tell the Walter Scheib story - and much more.

    The museum will trace the rise of Al Capone, Meyer Lansky, Lucky Luciano, Bugsy Siegel and many others.

    There are also classic Tommy guns, copper stills and revolvers on display. After moving past an elegant barroom, visitors glimpse the once-hidden booze-filled restaurant.

    In the basement, small groups will put on protection helmets to see bootleggers' hidden paths, beer lockers - and the safe.

    Still there.

    "These 'gangsters' in our past were our neighbors, part of the fabric of the community. And a part of New York," says Otway.

    The museum will have a special preview Sunday, noon to 5p.m. It opens this spring. For more info: go to moagnyc.org.

  8. #23
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    Every fabric has a few stains on it, given time.

    I wonder what happened to that "gold currency"

  9. #24
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    The MOAG website is still a work in progress, but they do have a Gangster Museum Forum up and running.

  10. #25
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    Stand back!!!!

    19 posts and counting!!!!!

  11. #26
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    Very nice.


    In Detail> Frick Portico Gallery

    A Beaux-Arts porch transforms into an light-filled exhibition space.

    by Molly Heintz


    Davis Brody Bond created a climate-controlled gallery from one of the Frick mansion's open air loggias. Paul Rivera

    Balanced on a pedestal at the end of the Frick Collection’s newest gallery, Diana, goddess of the chase, appears to have just leaped back across Fifth Avenue after a little hunting in Central Park. That this late-18th-century statue by Jean-Antoine Houdon was allowed to emerge from storage and strike a pose against an appropriately sylvan backdrop is one of the highlights of a thoughtful renovation led by Davis Brody Bond (DBB).

    The Portico Gallery for Decorative Arts and Sculpture, the museum’s first new exhibition space in 35 years, was created from a south-facing loggia running along the Frick mansion’s ample front yard. The project came about when a donor’s gift (an extensive collection of porcelain) required additional display space. DBB and former Frick director Anne Poulet decided to take a cue from the 1914 building’s original architect, Thomas Hastings of the firm Carrère and Hastings, who, just after completing Henry Frick’s main house, immediately began sketching up a proposal for a sculpture gallery addition.

    Left to Right: Thomas hastings' 1916 drawing for a proposed sculpture gallery at The Frick mansion; a plan of the New Gallery with ITS Bluestone Floor; and a section showing DAvis Brody Bond's new glass curtain wall and ventilation system. (right).
    Courtesy the frick collection/DBB
    Hastings’ scheme went on hold once the United States entered World War I in 1917 and never came to pass due to Frick’s death in 1919. But almost a century later, that plan to create a sculpture gallery connected to the main house led DBB to consider the disused colonnaded loggia, whose decorative limestone relief carving has been fading due to exposure to corrosive exhaust fumes from Fifth Avenue traffic. Part of the original house, the long and narrow 815-square-foot loggia was accessible from the library, but had long been closed to museum goers.

    The new gallery’s southern orientation means copious amounts of sunlight, an issue for paintings but less so for sculpture and ceramics. “We wanted to maintain the character of an outdoor space,” said DBB partner Carl Krebs, whose team specified low-iron glass panels to fill the spaces between the columns. The panels, some of the largest in production at approximately 14 feet by 7 feet by 2 inches, are cantilevered from below, resting in shoes secured 16 inches below the floor. Framed in bronze and set slightly back from the outmost edge of the loggia’s floor, the glass panels defer to the limestone columns, allowing the space to retain its original appearance both from the interior and the exterior.

    LEFT TO RIGHT: Illuminated at night, the Gallery becomes a vitrine for sculpture and ceramics; the modernist Curtain Wall defers to the Loggia's Beaux arts Colonnade; from the Rotunda, Houdon's Diana The Huntress (1776-1795) overlooks the 815-Square-foot gallery.
    Paul Rivera

    The loggia’s stone paving was too damaged to be saved, but removing it allowed DBB to install power lines and a radiant heating system below for finely tuned climate control. Ventilation of the space was made easy thanks to a series of existing grates running along the floor of the interior wall, where the gallery’s main display cases are mounted. The grates originally allowed air into servant’s quarters in the basement, and DBB took advantage of the subterranean space to install new air ducts. Lantern-style custom lighting fixtures modeled on those found elsewhere in the house hang from the ceiling of a newly insulated roof; a striking bluestone floor replicates the pattern of the early 20th-century paving, running the length of the gallery and culminating in Diana’s oval rotunda.

    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=5837

  12. #27
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    Gorgeous hall, but they need to keep exhibits rotating through there fairly quickly to prevent sun damage to the pieces.

    Odd that many of these were probably made for just such a presentation, but there are few materials that can truly stand the test of time unless hidden in a box for nobody to see......

  13. #28

    Default Museums...

    Ah, the museums of New York.

    When I lived in the City, I'd pass them with little thought. I hadn't yet reached that point in my cultural personality to bother to see what was inside any of them, and except for a few visits to The Met and MOMA I didn't see the insides of NYC's many museums until I became a freakin' visitor, a tourist!!!
    I moved to Florida in the early 70's and put New York behind me.

    Over the years, Frank Lloyd Wright had become a sort of icon to me. One day during a business trip, I discovered an entire college campus languishing in the Florida sun--Florida Southern in Lakeland, one of Wright's more interesting efforts, and I grew curious of his other works-- most notably The Guggenheim, his last major structure.
    Then, one day, just before leaving on a business trip in the mid '90s that would take me back to NYC for the first time in 22 years, I read a story about Wright's OTHER New York design, the Jaguar dealership on Park Avenue. Wright only had 2 comissions in NYC. He would refuse others because he did not LIKE New York.
    (The Park Ave effort is now a Mercedes outlet, and worth a visit if you are in the neighborhood. It's a coincidental preview to the Guggenheim's design ethos, with stark cement walls and swooping ramps. Amazingly, after nearly 70 years of commercial use it is still in the original configuration that Wright imagined, except there are now a bunch of Benzes on the ramps instead if Jaguars).

    I made plans to visit them both. That led me to the Museum of Modern Art, and finally the Museum of The City of New York, both noteworthy experiences.
    I left the City with vows to repeat this the NEXT time I get to town, and I did, sooner than expected. About two weeks after I got back from NY, I read about a motorcycle exhibit at the Guggenheim, and I flew right back to see it, then I went to the New-York Historical Society.

    Since, I've seen them ALL, from Intrepid to the Jewish, from the Museum of the Indian to the Rose Room (on it's inaugural evening) to the Cooper-Hewett and the Skyscraper Museum ( at all 3 of it's locations). I went to the Sex Museum, went to Brooklyn for the Subway Museum and to Queens ( repeatedly) to see the Panorama of NYC. I introduced my grandsons ( and my self) to the Children's Museum and the Met.

    There are still a half-dozen I need to visit, like the Museum of Broadcasting or the Frick, and one day I'll get around to that. I'm a fool for New York's museums. The collection of museums scattered around The City has to be the BEST in the World.
    Last edited by Hof; February 24th, 2012 at 03:01 PM.

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