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Thread: Terra-cotta in New York City

  1. #16

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    enric archivell

    Somewhere on 59th Street

  2. #17
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Corbin Building; Wikipedia; Masterpiece Next Door
    Built: 1888-1889
    Designed by: Francis H. Kimball; NYC-Architecture
    Address: 11 John Street
    Landmark status:


    (from Masterpiece Next Door/Epicharmus at Flickr)



    http://www.hdc.org/neighborhoodatriskFulton-Nassau.htm

    Gotham Gazette article

    More images and information @ WiredNY

  3. #18
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek2k3 View Post
    Somewhere on 59th Street
    That's the Gainsborough Studios at 222 Central Park South (59th Street), designed by Charles W. Buckham in 1908, and designated a landmark on February 16th, 1988.

    From The Landmarks of New York, Barbaralee Diamondstein-Spielvogel:

    The building's most distinctive feature is the terra-cotta frieze Festival Procession by the Austrian-born sculptor Isidore Konti, which depicts people of all ages carrying gifts to the altar of the arts. Located above the first story, the frieze, in conjunction with the colorful tiles above the sixth story, the bust of Gainsborough, and the artist's palette over the entrance, effectively announces the building's purpose.


    http://www.cityrealty.com/nyc/manhat...ark-south/5104
    Last edited by Merry; October 3rd, 2009 at 03:36 AM.

  4. #19
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Little Singer Building; NYC-Architecture
    Built: 1904
    Designed by: Ernest Flagg
    Address: 561-563 Broadway
    Landmark status: within the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District, designated August 14th, 1973







    (from NYC-Architecture site linked above)



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/epicharmus/2878081481/

  5. #20
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    Wallace Building; Masterpiece Next Door
    Built: 1893-1894
    Designed by: Oswald Wirz
    Address: 56-58 Pine Street
    Landmark status: designated February 11th, 1997






    (from Masterpiece Next Door site linked above)

  6. #21
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    Greenwich Club Residences; Masterpiece Next Door
    Built: 1930
    Designed by: Lafayette A. Goldstone and Alexander Zamshnick
    Address: 19 Rector Street
    Landmark status:





    http://www.flickr.com/photos/epichar...7600721292079/

  7. #22
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    Sofia Condominiums (College Board)
    Built: 1929-1930
    Designed by: Jardine, Hill & Murdock
    Address: 34-43 West 61st Street
    Landmark status: Designated April 12th, 1983






    http://www.agilitynut.com/deco/nyc.html



    http://www.cityrealty.com/nyc/manhat...1st-street/280

  8. #23
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    Cliff Dweller's Apartments
    Built: 1914-1917
    Designed by: Herman Lee Meader
    Address: 243 Riverside Drive
    Landmark status:


    This building is listed in Susan Tunick's book, but other references refer to the ornament as being limestone .

    This is nevertheless a very unusual building with very interesting ornamentation.







    (from City Review page linked above)



    http://www.cityrealty.com/nyc/manhat...ide-drive/1846

  9. #24
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Ambassador Apartments
    Built: 1932
    Designed by: Lucian Pisciatta
    Address: 30 Daniel Low Terrace, New Brighton, Staten Island
    Landmark status:





    http://www.agilitynut.com/deco/nyc.html
    Last edited by Merry; August 7th, 2010 at 04:09 AM. Reason: Added details

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    That's the Gainsborough Studios at 222 Central Park South (59th Street), designed by Charles W. Buckham in 1908, and designated a landmark on February 16th, 1988.

    Photo from 2007.




    Article from 1988

    Gainsborough Studios; The Restoration of an 1881 Co-op

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    Published: Sunday, July 10, 1988

    TRADITIONALLY, contractors and vendors are wary in responding to initial inquiries from co-op boards, who represent shareholders wanting to keep costs down. But an object lesson that confounds this truism is now nearing completion at the art-encrusted Gainsborough Studios at 222 Central Park South.

    For in the last eight years, the 80-year-old co-op has elected to spend more than $1 million on essentially cosmetic restoration.

    Co-ops and artists' studios had enjoyed a symbiotic relationship since the first co-op, the Rembrandt, was built at 154 West 57th Street in 1881, the result of a joint venture among several artists. By the early 1900's, artist-entrepreneurs were erecting studio-cooperatives as a serious business.

    But the facade and interior of the 30-unit, 16-story Gainsborough, between Seventh Avenue and Broadway, are anything but businesslike. The ground-floor exterior is an ornate, but not remarkable, arrangement of white terra cotta and granite Ionic columns. Above this ran a frieze, now removed, by Isidore Konti, representing a procession of people bringing gifts to the altar of the arts. In the middle, in a shallow niche, was a bust of the painter Thomas Gainsborough above a palette.

    Starting at the second floor are two bays of large studio windows, with elaborate detailing, flanked by three brick piers. At the seventh floor, the brick piers are faced with multicolored tiles in a geometric design. The roof is not crowned with a projecting cornice, which would cut down on the light for the studios facing north, but a restrained treatment of shell forms in terra cotta.

    It is difficult to say whether Mr. Konti or the building's architect, Charles W. Buckham, was primarily responsible for the exterior, but the interior plan was no doubt Mr. Buckham's work.

    COMPLETE ARTICLE

    Copyright The New York Times.

  11. #26
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    Devinne Press Building; Wikipedia
    Built: 1885-1886
    Designed by: Babb, Cook & Willard
    Address: 393-399 Lafayette Street
    Landmark status: Designated October 19th, 1966



    (NYC-Architecture linked above)


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/wallyg/501175392/


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/cornell...ry/3678982666/

    New York, 15 walking tours: an architectural guide to the metropolis, Gerard Wolfe


    Streetscapes/De Vinne Press Building, Fourth and Lafayette Streets; An Understated Masterpiece That Earns Its Keep

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY


    April 13, 2003


    THE De Vinne Press Building is among the most sophisticated works of masonry in New York, a tour de force of honestly simple bricklaying built for one of the premier printing companies of a century ago. As work crews repair the terra cotta cornice, the owner, Edwin Fisher, looks back on two decades, starting with his purchase of the 1886 structure as a backup location for his Astor Place liquor store a block away.

    Mr. Fisher never had to move the store, but the De Vinne Press Building has proved, for him, not just architecturally satisfying but also a ''financial bonanza.''

    Although first developed in the 1830's as a street of top-tier urban houses, after the mid-19th century Lafayette Place (renamed Lafayette Street around 1900) evolved into a literary and cultural center. The Astor Library (now the Joseph Papp Public Theater) was built there from 1853 to 1881, and Cooper Union was finished nearby in 1859.

    After the Civil War, Lafayette and the surrounding streets began to fill up with publishers, paper dealers, stationers, bookbinders, printers, engravers and a broad variety of periodicals, like ''The Homeless Child,'' an advocacy journal published out of the Mission of the Immaculate Virgin at Lafayette and Great Jones Street in the 1880's and 1890's. The Aldine Club, for printers and publishers, was in an old house just south of the Astor Library.

    In 1886, Theodore De Vinne built a new building for his printing company at the northeast corner of Fourth Street and Lafayette. De Vinne was already established as a leading American printer; a founder of the Grolier Club, an organization devoted to the history of printing, he had printed the club's first publication, ''Decree of the Star Chamber Concerning Printing.''

    Born in 1828, he entered the printing business in the 1840's and printed many of the leading American magazines, like the St. Nicholas Magazine, Scribner's Monthly and The Century. A connoisseur of the printed work, De Vinne wrote books like ''The Invention of Printing,'' ''Correct Composition'' and ''Title Pages.''

    He was successful in business but still considered printing nearly an art. Writing in 1897 in the magazine The Outlook, he said that to try to teach it was no better than giving ''a formula for the painting of a picture or the writing of a poem.''

    Designed by Babb, Cook & Willard, the De Vinne building is a masterpiece of understated power, big, broad plain brick walls decorated almost entirely by their own constructive elements -- strapwork quoining at the corners, high deep arches, multipaned windows -- and a sweeping arcade of window openings across the top. Writing in The Architectural Record in 1904, the critic Russell Sturgis said: ''No photographs give the full sense of its bigness, its breadth and its mass. More than once visitors on their way to see it have been pulled up suddenly by a sudden sense of its large presence.'' It seems out of place in New York, more like some brawny Midwestern factory.

    De Vinne died in 1914 and in 1922 James W. Bothwell, president of the company, announced that the press would cease operations. ''Labor unions are absolutely prohibitive of fine work,'' he said, but also added that ''the last thing people want to pay for today is quality.'' The building later became a metalwork factory.

    De Vinne's building, along with most Victorian architecture, was in eclipse by the mid-20th century, although the critic Lewis Mumford went out of his way to call it ''a special bouquet'' in The New York Times in 1953. In the rediscovery of the city's architectural history beginning in the 1960's, it was designated a landmark in 1966.

    In their book ''Rise of the New York Skyscraper (Yale, 1996), Sarah Bradford Landau and Carl W. Condit call it ''one of the nation's outstanding architectural monuments,'' tracing its muscular, arched character back to the German rundbogenstil of the mid-19th century.

    And the architectural historian Mosette Broderick, who has studied the work of Babb, Cook & Willard, says of the building, ''Wow.'' The area is utterly changed from only a generation ago. Where bales of rags and pallets of wire rope once filled the sidewalks, now they are crowded with N.Y.U. students and tourists bored with SoHo.

    Mr. Fisher, who owns the De Vinne Press Building, has seen this himself. After World War II he started what became a chain of 24 liquor stores in New Jersey, and in 1960 bought a Manhattan store -- what is now Astor Place Wines and Spirits, now a large operation at the southeast corner of Astor Place and Lafayette Street. He had made a policy of owning the buildings of his New Jersey stores, but the owner of the Astor and Lafayette building would not sell.

    SO, as insurance in case he lost his lease, Mr. Fisher bought the De Vinne Press Building in 1982 and ran the De Vinne building as a real estate investment, retiring from the liquor business, which his son Andrew now operates. ''I get here at six in the morning and leave at four -- I'm in my low 80's, and this is all I do,'' said Mr. Fisher, who seems very vigorous for his age. He drives down from his apartment building in the East 60's and, ''at that hour, I'm here in 12 minutes,'' he said. His office faces south, and he sits against a background of an original giant, round-topped window of 67 panes -- ''The windows are still good -- why get rid of them?'' he asked.

    Because of the huge windows -- which provided illumination for the intricate work of publishing -- the interiors are high and light. The offices of the architect David Paul Helpern, who has 11,000 square feet, have arched brick ceilings painted white, resting on red painted supporting beams, held up by cast iron columns. The columns are bare except for a peculiar, perhaps Egyptian-style faceted capital that shifts into an octagon shape, repeated by a collar farther down the shaft.

    If you cannot get into one of the offices, you can see these in the Serafina restaurant on the main floor, entered through a majestic set of iron gates -- which are a thrill to swing back and forth.

    Mr. Fisher has gradually made improvements over the years, and is working on a repair of the projecting cornice, in a $65,000 alteration designed by the engineers Vincent Stramandinoli & Associates. ''This building has been a financial bonanza -- it must be six or seven times what I paid for it; rents were originally $5 per square foot, and now they're getting to $30,'' Mr. Fisher said. ''I will not spare money to keep this building looking the way it should.''

    http://www.nytimes.com/2003/04/13/re...20Keep&st=cse#

  12. #27
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    Siegel-Cooper Building
    Built: 1895-1897
    Designed by: Delemos & Cordes
    Address: 616-632 Sixth Avenue
    Landmark status: within the Ladies' Mile Historic District, designated 1989



    (NYC-Architecture linked above)


    (NYC-Architecture linked above)

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/anniebee/2702977085/

    Streetscapes NYT article 1991

    New York Daily Photo blog

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    Great building with a great story.

  14. #29
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    Studio Building, Emporis, City Realty
    Built: 1909-1907
    Designed by: Harde & Short
    (also famous for Alwyn Court, to be covered later)
    Address: 44 West 77th Street
    Landmark status: within the Central Park West-76th Street Historic District, designated 1973



    (from NYC-Architecture, linked above)


    (from City Realty, linked above)

    Streetscapes: The Buildings of Harde & Short, 2005

    Streetscapes: 44 West 77th Street; Restoration of an Altered Facade, 1992

    Restoration work

    Luxury apartment houses of Manhattan: an illustrated history, by Andrew Alpern (scroll down to see what the building looked like before a lot of the terra-cotta ornamentation was removed)
    Last edited by Merry; October 25th, 2009 at 02:23 AM.

  15. #30
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    Red House, Emporis
    Built: 1903-1904
    Designed by: Harde & Short
    (also famous for Alwyn Court, to be covered later)
    Address: 350 West 85th Street
    Landmark status: Designated September 14th, 1982
    , Landmarks Preservation Commission report


    http://www.landmarkwest.org/maps_and...ed%20House.htm

    A wonderful map of Upper West Side landmarks and historic districts at Landmarks West.


    National Register of Historic Places listings in Manhattan above 59th to 110th Streets

    A Journey into Dorothy Parker's New York, by Kevin C. Fitzpatrick and Marion Meade (scroll up a bit)

    From The Landmarks of New York, Barbaralee Diamondstein-Spielvoge
    l:

    ...The lively six-story building takes its name from the color of the brick facing, which is set off by an abundant use of light-colored terra-cotta ornament. The facade is organized into two pavilions, each with angled sides, flanking a slightly recessed central window bay. The detailing of the facade, which displays the concern for historicism typical of much of the firm's work, is enhanced by a strong contrast between the red brick and the cream-colored terra-cotta ornament. Recalling the sixteenth-century style of Francois I in its combination of French Gothic and Renaissance elements, the detailing includes the use of the salamander and crown motifs, baldachin canopies, and windows with multipaned sashes organized in bays.

    The facade is crowned by an entablature composed of a corbeled frieze supporting a projecting cornice and an architrave broken by diamond-shaped panels that repeat the pattern of the window spandrels. Elongated brackets terminate in terra-cotta pendants, which display foliate motifs and the crown of Fancois I.

    From Red House, 350 West 85th Street:

    Q. How did Red House, designed by Harde & Short at 350 West 85th Street, get onto that fairly ordinary block? . . . Herbert J. Gans, Department of Sociology, Columbia University

    A. Perhaps it's because Harde & Short had already been active all around 350 West 85th Street before they designed it in 1903, and the plot of land offered them the chance to build purely for themselves, on their own terms -- and advertise their design talents.

    Herbert S. Harde and R. Thomas Short had an architectural partnership from 1901 until 1915. Red House, completed in 1904, was their introduction for three striking buildings that continue to draw stares: 45 East 66th Street, at Madison Avenue (1906-1908), 44 West 77th Street (1907-1909) and Alwyn Court, 58th Street and Seventh Avenue (1907-1909).

    Information about their training is sketchy, but they weren't part of the elite Beaux-Arts crowd. About 1900 Harde & Short designed a few apartment houses on Riverside Drive in the mid-80's, none of which survive. These were Renaissance in style, a bit nicer than the usual humdrum but nothing exceptional.

    In 1902 Harde bought the unimproved land at 350 West 85th Street, and in 1903 he transferred it to a corporation he controlled with his wife, Eleanore -- the Eronel Realty Corporation.

    In the same year Harde & Short filed plans for a six-story apartment building unlike anything erected yet, a flamboyant but intelligent French Renaissance-style apartment building they called Red House.

    Harde studied in England and he must have known of the home of the English designer William Morris, also called Red House; Morris saw ugliness in cheap, mass-produced designs and promoted individuality in art.

    Other New York apartment builders had occasionally gone a little beyond the minimum in designing apartment houses, but Harde & Short's new building was astoundingly different.

    Apparently professional critics considered Red House only a stunt; the closest thing to a review it got was a brief mention in the Real Estate Record & Guide describing it as ''a departure from the usual.''

    Except for their three bigger, and better known, apartment houses of 1906-1909, Harde & Short otherwise made little impact on apartment-house architecture in New York -- except perhaps to convince developers to stick with tried-and-true formulas. Of the architects' other buildings, only Short's castle-like police station at 134 West 30th Street (1906-1908) goes well beyond the typical.
    Luxury apartment houses of Manhattan: an illustrated history, by Andrew Alpern
    Last edited by Merry; October 25th, 2009 at 02:32 AM.

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