Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 69

Thread: Terra-cotta in New York City

  1. #31
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Montauk Club, Forgotten New York, Wikipedia
    Built: 1889-1891
    Designed by: Francis H. Kimball
    , NYC-Architecture, Emporis
    Address: 25 Eighth Avenue, Park Slope, Brooklyn
    Landmark status:
    Within the Park Slope Historic District, designated 1973 (scroll up)


    (from Wikipedia entry, linked above)














    (All photos from Forgotten New York page, linked above)

    more photos by Steve Garza


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/spookyl...ns/3547972768/

    From the Montauk Club official website:

    Kimball was an early user of terra cotta ornamentation, the molded clay material that was just becoming fashionable. It is visible throughout the Club’s exterior, forming the surrounds of the windows and enclosing the columns on the balconies. The Indian faces that compose the capitals of the columns are of terra cotta, as are the Club’s two friezes: One, running around three sides of the building depicts scenes of the Montauk Indians; the other, above the main doorway on Eighth Avenue, shows the laying of the building’s cornerstone.
    From the AIA Guide to New York City, Norval White, Elliot Willensky:

    A Venetian Gothic palazzo, whose canal is the narrow lawn separating it from its cast-iron fence. Remember the Ca' d'Oro. But here in brownstone, brick, terra-cotta, and verdigris copper. It bears the name of a local tribe, which explains the 8th Avenue friezes at the 3rd and 4th stories, honoring these former local natives.
    Streetscapes/The Montauk Club in Brooklyn;A Venetian Palace With Native American Motif

    An Architectural Guidebook to Brooklyn
    , Francis Morrone

  2. #32
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post

    Bayard-Condict Building; Emporis; NYC-Architecture

    Built: 1897-1899
    Designed by: Louis Sullivan
    Address: 65-69 Bleecker Street






















    bayard

  3. #33
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Before Sullivan's Bayard-Condict Building rose on Bleecker at the north end of Crosby the site was occupied by a beautiful little Bank for Savings. The Italianate-style marble faced structure was constructed in 1856, replacing the Bleecker Street Presbyterian Church. In that time, just before the Civil War, Bleecker was quite a fashionable street, but it soon, as the immigrant population grew and the "slums" moved north from Five Points area, it slid into decline and became, for many years, a row notorious for boarding houses ...

    *
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bank for Savings_Bleecker Crosby_1860_01a.jpg 
Views:	262 
Size:	99.1 KB 
ID:	7888   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bank for Savings_Bleecker Crosby_1860_02a.jpg 
Views:	263 
Size:	75.8 KB 
ID:	7889  

  4. #34
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Candler Building; nyc-architecture; Wikipedia
    Built: 1914
    Designed by: Willauer, Shape & Bready
    Address: 220 West 42nd Street
    Landmark status:


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/wallyg/...n/photostream/


    (from Wikipedia entry linked above)


    http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showthread.php?p=290323


    From a review of Manhattan Skyscrapers by Eric Nash at City Review:

    Nash does include some buildings that other guides often overlook such as the Candler Building at 220 East 42nd Street, which was designed by Willauer, Shape & Bready and erected in 1914. It was built as the New York headquarters for the Coca-Cola Company and named after its founder, Asa Candler. Nash again bemoans architectural detail that is high up on a building: "Much of the terra-cotta detailing of cherub’s heads, architetural masks set in roundels, and well-articulated diapering is almost invisible from the street. A perforated railing of addorsed, overscaled sea horses and winged griffins at the top cornice compensates for the distance. This kind of ornamentation might cause one to speculate that American businessmen were furnished an empryean realm meant only for each other." Well, speculation be damned. It’s a lovely building and its rather lacy crown along the Great White Way of follies is fine.
    Manhattan Skyscrapers, Eric Nash


    Streetscapes/The Candler Building; Amid 42d Street Renewal, a Facade in Disrepair

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY


    March 31, 1996

    THROUGH all the hoopla of New York State's 42d Street Development Project, the gleaming terra-cotta Candler building has remained in private hands, looking slightly scruffier year by year, as if in anticipation of reaping a jackpot from surrounding rehabilitation.

    Now, as the larger project is beginning to come together, the Candler Building's owner, Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance, is starting a major facade repair of the building, which Asa G. Candler, head of the Coca-Cola Company, built in 1913.

    Born in Georgia in 1851, Candler began work as a druggist in Atlanta in the 1870's. He also acquired side products, like "Everlasting Cologne" and "Botanic Blood Balm."

    In 1890, Candler decided to concentrate exclusively on distributing another of his acquisitions -- Coca-Cola. The bottled syrup usually went to soda fountains and Candler's faith was soon justified. Thirty years after his purchase, the Coca-Cola Company was selling 280 million glasses and bottles of the beverage a month.

    In the early 1900's Candler started developing real estate. First came the 18-story Candler Building in Atlanta in 1906, followed by similar structures in Baltimore, Kansas City and, in 1913, New York. Candler was among many out-of-state investors who built skyscrapers in New York City, among them Liberty Tower at 55 Liberty Street and the Flatiron Building.

    In 1911 Candler assembled a plot on West 42d Street running back to 41st Street, and announced plans for a cream-colored terra cotta-clad tower designed by Willauercar, Shape & Bready. At that time architects and developers were still experimenting with skyscraper forms. The earlier generation of tall buildings had usually been built as giant blocks, which compromised interior lighting.

    But a new generation of designs called for relatively slender, free-standing towers, with adjacent parcels controlled to leave the side windows unobstructed. Henry W. Frohne, reviewing the building for American Architect in 1913, noted that developers had "learned through bitter experience that permanently well-lighted floor space is absolutely essential to a stable investment."

    The Candler tower, 78 feet wide and 89 feet deep, rises dramatically from its surroundings. There are some Spanish Renaissance details, especially in the terra-cotta open-work at the top, but the building is really in the skyscraper style of the period. Above a green tile roof 352 feet above the street rose a 36-foot flagpole.

    When completed in 1913 the Candler Building was the tallest building north of the 700-foot-high Metropolitan Life Tower on 24th Street. INSIDE, the building was mostly raw space, without much in the way of decorative touches, although Candler put his family crest on the doorknobs, elevator doors, mailboxes and other hardware. But he did not call it the Coca-Cola building, for Candler saw his real estate operations as entirely separate from his beverage company.

    One significant development was the provision for a fire tower, an enclosed fire stairway on the back of the building reached by was of an outside walkway. In 1911, scores of workers had died in the Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire, principally because of inadequate exits.

    Apparently business owners did not share Candler's vision of West 42d Street as a business address because his building remained unchallenged by other tall office or loft structures. Later demolitions have brought the average height of the rest of the block down to about two stories.

    Indeed, compared to other commercial areas, 42d Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues has remained remarkably intact since World War I, at least architecturally. But an increasingly sleazy atmosphere led to calls for large-scale redevelopment and renovation, culminating in the state-sponsored 42d Street Development Project of the early 80's. That plan involved the condemnation and redevelopment of the area with revived theaters and tall corner office buildings.

    The office-building component of the state plan is on hold, but there is new retail life in the works: The restored Victory Theater opened across the street last year, and a Disney products store will occupy the southwest corner of 42d Street and Seventh Avenue.

    IN 1993 a prior owner lost the Candler Building at foreclosure to the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company. Last year the new owner put orange netting around what remains of the terra-cotta ornament at the top. Stephen Schofel, senior managing director for Williams Real Estate, the managing agent of the building, said the architectural firm of Swanke Hayden Connell was beginning to analyze the terra-cotta sheathing, which has begun to crack and leak.

    When the Candler Building first opened the rents were about 75 cents a square foot. Now the building is 65 percent leased, with current rents about $20 per square foot. But Mr. Schofel believes that when two more projects flanking the building -- a new Disney Theater and Madame Tussaud's Wax Museum -- open within the next three years "the block will have a lot of 'wow' value, it will be the entertainment capital of New York." And, he adds, a new demand for office space will finally bring a full tenant roster to the building -- at $30 a square foot.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1996/03/31/re...disrepair.html

    http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-70741414.html

  5. #35
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Court Chambers Building
    Built: 1927
    Designed by: Abraham J. Simberg
    Address: 66 Court Street, Brooklyn
    Landmark status:




    ( both from Emporis entry linked above)


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/emry/3023806562/


    http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%2...urt/court.html


    Streetscapes - December 3rd, 2009

    Portrait of a Building as a Young High-Rise

    Q. We are renovating the lobby of our co-op at 66 Court Street, which was finished in 1927. Can you give us a lead on where to look for an image which could be enlarged? ... Ellen Murphy, Brooklyn

    A. The photograph published here of your building as it looked in 1939 is from my collection. The Brooklyn Public Library has a good one from the 1940s, perhaps of higher resolution, on its Web site at www.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/brooklyncollection/.

    Although a bit distant, another photograph of the building, from 1928, is posted online at the New York Public Library’s Web site, http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/, reference number 705481F.

    Your building was designed to be 430 feet high, with a dining room on the terrace at the 25th floor. The architect, Abraham J. Simberg, had previously done some four- and five-story apartment buildings in Brooklyn and one- and two-story buildings in Manhattan.

    Born in Ukraine in 1892, Mr. Simberg arrived in the United States in 1900, and the 1920 census found him working as a draftsman in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He received his architectural license in 1922.

    The Court Street building was a big project for a beginning architect, but Mr. Simberg developed a blocky, faceted neo-Gothic tower that is perfectly credible against the rest of the skyline.

    The owners began missing tax and mortgage payments in early 1929, however, and by 1932 the building had gone into receivership, according to a 1939 article in The New York Times.

    And Mr. Simberg? It is unfortunate that just after his big break the stock market crashed. Through the 1930s, he did a series of modest alterations, like many major architects.

    But he did have a specialty to fall back on. When he registered for the draft in 1942, he also gave his occupation. He was working for Kindlund & Drake, naval architects.

    Mr. Simberg died in 1981, and his tombstone, viewable on a subscription database, Ancestry.com, bears the inscription “renowned architect.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/06/re...ref=realestate

  6. #36
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default 20 Bond and 24 Bond Street - NoHo

    On the south side of Bond Street, on a block between Lafayette and The Bowery, are two buildings of the same era (circa 1890) and with facades showing terra cotta ...

    20 Bond (L.) and 24 Bond (R.):



    At the end of the 1800s this block was full of publishing companies. Number 22 Bond (razed -- with the brown plywood above) was home to MacMillan and Company. 24 Bond was home to a number of publishers, including (at an earlier date) the John Wurtel Lovell Company and Albert Cogswell & Company. 20 Bond listed among its publishers James Kelly ("Compiler of the American Catalogs").

    24 Bond is the simpler of the two, with buff brick on the lower floors and some simple terra cotta detailing up top:







    20 Bond, near the corner of Lafayette, was designed by Cleverdon & Putzel and exhibits a much showier use of terra cotta, incorporating richly modeled columns with Celtic imagery. The facade also incorporates limestone and light brick. Various styles of circles and dots are used as horizontal details. Each story has a different tale to tell. It's a real beauty (and home to the painting studio of artist Chuck Close):

































    *

  7. #37
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    The Waverly (1928, architect Walter S. Schneider). Originally with 78 suites, The Waverly was built for $1M by the Citadel Construction Corporation on the site of the Old Warren Farm and later the Greenwich Savings Bank -- a construction bond certificate from that time can be seen HERE):

    Situated at 134-136 Waverly Place on the SW corner of Sixth Avenue in Greenwich Village, this is a 16-story building in buff, tan and brown brick with terra cotta detailing, including some large panels in the form of armored knights above the entryway (their the trusted dogs and horses are nearby). Up top, there is a wrap-around terrace (VID of the spectacular view from the PH there, which sold a couple of years ago for $9M and a 1/2 floor with 3 bedrooms just below is now on the market for $3.75M). The terrace is framed by terra cotta crowned parapets; just below neo-gothic extensions protrude from the facade. It's a very choice piece of work ...































    136 Waverly Place

  8. #38

    Default

    Forward Building


    Emilio Guerra

    173-175 East Broadway, Lower East Side, Manhattan, New York City.

    Constructed in 1912, the ten-story Forward Building remains to this day a towering presence within the context of its immediate Lower East Side neighborhood.

    Jarmulowsky's Bank located a short distance west at Canal and Allen Streets. For the newspaper which avowed, "The Forward will be a socialist paper and its first duty is to spread the ideas of socialism among the Jewish masses," the height of its new office building was a considered and deliberate response to that bank, capitalism's major monument on the Lower East Side.
    - From the 1986 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report.


    Emilio Guerra



    Emilio Guerra



    Emilio Guerra

  9. #39

    Default

    I love the last two posts. I'll try to swing by the Forward if I ever get back to NY.

  10. #40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Luca View Post
    I'll try to swing by the Forward if I ever get back to NY.
    Whaddya mean "if"??!?

    * * *

    ^ All buildings like this need to be appreciated is a good cleaning.

  11. #41

    Default

    I mean that something always seems to come up and prevent it. Sorry, private whinge.

  12. #42
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Vanderbilt Hotel
    Built: 1910-13
    Designed by: Warren & Wetmore
    Address: 4 Park Avenue
    Landmark status: ; Della Robbia Bar (The Crypt) designated April 5th, 1994



    http://georgettebauerdorf.com/




    (both from NYC-Architecture site linked above)


    http://www.cityrealty.com/new-york-c...rk-avenue/1404


    Streetscapes/The Former Vanderbilt Hotel, 34th Street and Park Avenue; It Was a Showcase for Terra Cotta. Much Remains.

    March 9th, 2003

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    THE delicate Adam-style terra cotta decoration of the former Vanderbilt Hotel at 34th Street and Park Avenue received rough treatment in the 1960's -- the lower facade was stripped away and some statues on the parapet were removed. But much terra cotta remained, and it was repaired in a facade alteration that ended last year.

    Part of the building's interior is a landmark, but the exterior is unprotected, and the future of what was once a widely praised work of architecture raises interesting questions for preservationists.

    Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, the great-grandson of Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt, the railroad magnate, built the hotel in 1912. Heir to millions, Alfred Vanderbilt had grown up in the palatial family house at 57th Street and Fifth Avenue, where Bergdorf-Goodman now stands. He built his new hotel primarily for permanent residents, to accommodate a new generation of the rich who sought freedom from household cares -- including himself. He took two floors at the top of the 22-story building.

    The architects Warren & Wetmore (co-designers of Grand Central Terminal, also build for the Vanderbilt family) designed one of the most widely admired buildings of the period, a slim, high rectangular mass of variegated steel-gray brick and cream-colored terra cotta.

    The building was in fact a showcase for terra cotta. The ground floor boasted huge Adam-style windows with delicate fluted fans; the upper portions had a rich, frothy network of terra-cotta colonettes, helmets, lions' heads and lozenge shapes, all set against a crisscross brick pattern.

    The roof omitted the usual projecting cornice (by then criticized for casting shadows) for a parapet festooned with lacy decoration with classical heads. To add a whimsical touch, the curving parapet at the top was outlined in electric lights.

    A critic for the magazine Architecture & Building loved the gray brick for its complex undercurrent of ''hidden and indescribable golden browns and blues,'' calling it ''a sight worth crossing a continent to see.'' Susan Tunick, head of the Friends of Terra Cotta, says that the material was the work of the New Jersey Terra Cotta Company.

    The emphasis on permanent residents in the Vanderbilt freed Warren & Wetmore from the usual constraints of hotel design. Since the hotel did not require a large ballroom, the architects were able to make the first floor one huge lounge, with high vaulted ceilings. A portion of the ground floor was set up as a dining room, but the much larger grill room and bar -- several fantastical arched spaces covered in polychrome terra cotta -- were on the basement floor.

    An unidentified assistant manager told The New York Times that the hotel's public spaces could be more homelike than usual, adding that ''it has been our aim in decorating the house to eliminate the red and gold idea in hotel decoration.'' Instead of the usual heavy velvet and gilt ornament, the interiors used a chaste mix of simple stone surfaces with carved stone friezes on the upper walls.

    Amenities like pneumatic tubes that could deliver messages from bottom to top in seven seconds led the magazine American Architect to praise the Vanderbilt as ''a memory of the land of ancient courtesies'' in an increasingly hectic age.

    Some idea of the character of the Vanderbilt's guests is given in a 1913 account in The Times. An unidentified family left the hotel unexpectedly, and their French maid, identified only as Felice, hurriedly packed the trunk dedicated to her mistress's furs. In her rush, the maid closed the lid on the family dog, a tiny Pomeranian named Papillon. The dog was found only when the hotel's elevator operator became alarmed by moaning from the trunk.

    THE 1915 census included residents like Duncan Roberts, 62, president of the United States Express Company, a parcel-delivery concern. The census, recorded in June, did not list Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt. He had died a hero in May after giving his life jacket to a woman on the Lusitania, which sank after being torpedoed by the Germans off Ireland.

    Vanderbilt's apartment was taken over by the Women's City Club, whose literary and politically active members came to hear guests like George Kirchwey, warden of Sing Sing prison, lecture on social issues.

    The renowned tenor Enrico Caruso later took the suite. On. Jan. 1, 1921, ill with pleurisy, he was attended by six physicians, who were especially concerned that the noise from New Year's revelers was keeping him awake, even though they were far below. Caruso died in Naples that August.

    The Vanderbilt heirs sold the building in 1925. In 1967, the hotel was converted to apartments on the upper floors, with offices on the lower six. The bar adjacent to the terra cotta grill complex survived fairly intact and is now the restaurant Vanderbilt Station. At the time, one plan was to strip the building to its steel frame. But only the lower floors were modernized, by the architects Schuman, Lichtenstein & Claman. The lower facade was stripped away, replaced with a modern facade of travertine.

    A dozen or more of the terra cotta statues on the parapet were removed to improve the view from several new penthouse apartments. Peter Claman, who worked on the project, says that he took a number of the terra cotta busts for his own use. Others were given to an art dealer, and two wound up at the Brooklyn Museum Sculpture Garden. In 1994 the surviving portion the terra cotta bar was designated an interior landmark. But a 1985 survey by the Landmarks Preservation Commission said that the exterior had less architectural significance, perhaps because of the modernization of the lower section.

    Last year the building's owner, Four Park Avenue Associates, completed a $700,000 facade alteration. The architects, Israel Berger & Associates, did the normal repointing and limited patching of what Mr. Berger describes as ''ordinary deterioration.''

    Stanford Chan, an architect in the firm, said that the terra cotta was in generally good condition, including the remaining projecting busts ringing the parapet, and that the repair is more or less invisible from the street.

    There is nothing to prevent a future owner from stripping the building's exterior, although such work has declined in recent decades. And the question of regulating the building creates a quandary for preservationists.

    Mosette Broderick, an architectural historian and professor at New York University, said that the 1967 alteration fell within the minimum requirement that a building be 30 years old to receive landmark designation, but she added that she was not sure that the building as altered merited protection. Norval White, an architect and the co-author of ''The A.I.A. Guide to New York City'' (Crown, 2000) said that ''the ravages to the ground floor have taken it off the preservation list.''

    But Jeffrey Kroessler, the president of the Queensborough Preservation League, who is also active in citywide preservation issues, said: ''All manner of classical and Victorian buildings were remuddled in the 50's and 60's, but that does not entirely negate their historic character nor remove an obligation to maintain the historic elements. And it's reversible.''

    http://www.nytimes.com/2003/03/09/re...wcase-for.html


    Streetscapes: The Della Robbia Bar; Does a Far-From-Pristine Remnant Rate Protection?


    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    April 4, 1993

    AT Fiori's, certainly one of the city's noisiest restaurants, the ceramic-tile ceiling's low curves bounce conversation back like news conference microphones.

    But in just the place one might expect noisy argument there is none: When the Landmarks Preservation Commission proposed designation for the remains of the Vanderbilt Hotel's 1912 Della Robbia Bar, instead of argument there was only consent from both lessee and owner. If the remaining portion of the bar is given landmark designation, it would then seem to be only the second landmarking of its kind -- the designation of part of the Oyster Bar in Grand Central Terminal is the other. This is unusual in a discipline that highly prizes intact examples of architecture.

    The hotel, on the west side of Park Avenue between 33d and 34th Streets, was designed with the characteristic catalogue of unusual hotel rooms typical at the turn of the century -- a giant vaulted lobby and palm room, a Japanese-style buffet and a sumptuous brass cashier's screen in the Adam style, the hotel's prevailing mode.

    One room, the Della Robbia Room, with a long series of polychrome tile spaces reaching up to a balcony level bar, defied any stylistic label. Named for the Renaissance family of ceramicists, the basement grill room was a vast double-height grotto of ceramic art with a stand of tree-like tile-encrusted columns running up to a broad quilt of shallow vaults that spread out like a forest canopy.

    Historic photographs show it decorated with an elaborate Adam-style balcony railing and murals of naturalistic scenes. The tall square columns were faced with tile and trimmed at the corners and top with decorative fretwork. The vaults themselves were of a muted palette of tan, aqua, Delft blue and one tiny polychrome frieze.

    What differentiates such an interior and its decoration from most others is the way the esthetic so closely matches the engineering. These are load-bearing, Guastavino vaults, no mere applique but "eloquent testimony to the wisdom of making construction decorate the building," wrote Samuel Howe in American Architect in 1912. The Landmarks Preservation Commission says the tile was made by Rookwood Pottery of Cincinnati.

    Although published historic photographs show only the main Della Robbia Room, plans and written descriptions indicate that the bar was on the 33d Street end. It had the same treatment as the Della Robbia Room but was built over the basement-level kitchen and thus was only half as high. Fiori's now occupies part of the bar.

    The Vanderbilt architects, Warren & Wetmore, had considered wooden paneling for the grill but rejected it to have the hotel fireproof. In 1967 the Vanderbilt was rebuilt in a conversion to apartments and offices designed by Schuman, Lichtenstein & Claman. The original first-floor hotel interiors were destroyed, as well as the Della Robbia Room, which was converted to a garage.

    The bar largely escaped demolition along with two long narrow bays from the original balcony. Perhaps it was then that large barrel ends were attached to the center points of the vaults and the decorative terra cotta columns covered over with wood and copper casing, suggestive of a beer hall.

    The tile work is perhaps eight feet off the floor and thus the space does not have the expansiveness of the original room, but it is still a pleasing surprise to the uninitiated.

    In 1989 a similar room, the Marine Grill, in the former Hotel McAlpin, was destroyed by the Gap clothing store. In that case the Landmarks Commission took no action but the demolition spurred Susan Tunick, president of the Friends of Terra Cotta, to seek preservation of the Della Robbia Bar, and her lobbying was in large part responsible for the commission's hearing last December.

    THE commission's proposal offered up the perfect case for an owner seeking to avoid regulation. The bar is really only a remnant, less than a fifth of the original complex. (It is an eerie feeling to see the bare columns in the garage that once comprised the main Della Robbia Room). Even the limited section that does survive is anything but pristine, with the columns and other elements apparently lost beyond redemption.

    Judy Petrone, Fiori's manager, said the restaurant encourged the designation proposal even though it would mean more paperwork. "We certainly wouldn't want to change anything" she said. For the building's owner, a partnership including Louis and Jeffrey Feil, designation could severely restrict future tenancy of the space. But Jeffrey Gold, the managing agent, says, "It's a gorgeous room, and we're comfortable with it."

    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/04/04/re...l?pagewanted=1


    An excerpt from The Landmarks of New York, by Barbaralee Diamondstein-Spielvogel:

    ...Today the Vanderbilt Hotel building is office and storage space, and its facade has been stripped of ornament.

    The restaurant interior, however, remains largely unchanged. The bar (now the front dining room) and two adjacent bays (now the rear dining room) have vaulted ceilings. Elaborate terra-cotta dominates the decor, including flowers, keys, ropes, and grotesque heads. The significance of ceramics is indicated by the fact that the restaurant took its name from Luca della Robbia, a celebrated fifteenth-century terra-cotta craftsman...

  13. #43
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    German Dispensary, now Stuyvesant Polyclinic
    Built: 1883-84
    Designed by: William Schickel
    Address: 137 Second Avenue
    Landmark status: designated November 9th, 1976



    http://www.flickr.com/photos/8742248@N07/4152273926/


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/wallyg/510383810/






    above 3 photos: http://gammablog.com/tag/stuyvesant-polyclinic/


    Streetscapes | Second Avenue at Eighth Street

    1880s Features, Unveiled Again

    By CHRISTOPHER GRAY

    August 17, 2008


    ENDURING GIFTS
    The German Dispensary and adjacent library on Second Avenue near East Eighth Street, in 1899, left, and as they look today, right




    FOR most of the last half-century, the striking Victorian interior of the German Dispensary, built in 1884 at 137 Second Avenue, near East Eighth Street, was neglected and forlorn. Now, the rich red-brick-and-terra-cotta building has a new owner, and work is under way on uncovering its unusual decoration from 50 years of entombment.

    Like the branch library next door, the Second Avenue building of the German Dispensary was the gift of Anna and Oswald Ottendorfer, who ran the German newspaper New-Yorker Staats-Zeitung. That journal had great influence in Little Germany, on the Lower East Side around First and Second Avenues below 14th Street. The 1886 edition of Appleton’s Dictionary of New York described an area in which “lager-beer shops are numerous, and nearly all the signs are of German names.”

    The dispensary had been founded in 1857 and evolved into what is now Lenox Hill Hospital, at 77th Street and Park Avenue.

    In the mid-19th century, charitable institutions flourished and dispensaries met the needs of walk-in patients who did not have regular doctors. There were hospitals, orphanages and similar institutions for various nationalities and religions, among them Norwegians, French, Swiss, Italians, Jews, Presbyterians and Baptists.

    Of dispensaries, New York had about a dozen, including the Good-Samaritan, DeMilt, Northeastern, Northern, Harlem, Trinity Church and Eclectic Dispensaries. The Germans had a strong presence, and more than one dedicated facility in the area: just a few blocks away, at 78 Seventh Street, there was one called the German Poliklinik.

    Mrs. Ottendorfer was particularly interested in the Second Avenue project and picked the architect herself: William Schickel, who trained in Germany and came to the United States in the 1870s. He worked for Richard Morris Hunt before embarking on his own career, eventually becoming the top designer for the city’s Germans.

    Mrs. Ottendorfer’s gift opened in 1884. Though well received by the German community, it did not win over a critic for the Real Estate Record & Guide, who described an “entirely commonplace” building in a “Germanized renaissance” style, and singled out the porch as “very unschooled and uncouth.” But the writer, who was unidentified, did praise the “charm and precision of the color” of the terra cotta.

    The three-story building, practically incandescent in color, carries on its portico deeply modeled portrait busts of medical and scientific pioneers like Hippocrates, who gave his name to the medical oath, and Asclepius, the Greek god of medicine. Just visible in the recesses is the name Löher, most likely a reference to Alois Loeher, a well-known sculptor of the period.

    The frieze of busts at the top of the building is harder to see, but looks to be by the same hand: William Harvey, English physiologist; Carl von Linne (also known as Carl Linnaeus), Swedish botanist; Alexander von Humboldt, German scientist; Antoine Lavoisier, French chemist; and Christoph Hufeland, German physician. Photographs of some of the sculptures are posted at http://gammablog.com/tag/stuyvesant-polyclinic/.

    This was an early period for terra cotta, and there is a fresh innocence to the vigorous, deep carving, quite different from such work in later years, which often looked routine.

    The 1888 Charity Directory said the German Dispensary had treated 28,000 patients in the prior year.

    By 1905 the dispensary had moved out to a new building on the Upper East Side and sold its old building to the German Poliklinik. Both institutions changed their names during World War I, the Poliklinik to Stuyvesant Polyclinic.

    By the 1960s the Germans had been replaced by a younger, quite different generation. Dr. Arnold Bernstein, the institution’s chief psychologist, told The New York Times in 1961 that he treated actors, poets, painters and writers, for up to $1.50 per visit. Most of “these infantile, immature personalities,” the doctor said, have “a very sincere desire to do something useful and creative.”

    In more recent years — until its sale last year — the old dispensary building was part of Cabrini Medical Center. Although hospitals are notoriously hard on historic architecture, the interior of the Schickel building was remarkably intact, if run-down, with intricate stairway ironwork and door enframements, red marble wainscoting and a highly colored tile floor. Views of these are posted at http://curbed.com (search the site for Stuyvesant Polyclinic).

    Now the architect David Mayerfeld is working on an alteration for a future occupant, which he describes only as “a think-tank sort of thing, that works on business problems.”

    He plans to strip the paint from the intricate ironwork stairway railings and columns, and will have to add a sprinkler system throughout to retain the open stair hall. He says that removing half a century of dropped ceilings and tacked-on flooring has been a process of discovery, as bits of tile, tin ceiling and other finishes suddenly appear.

    In ornate building, the poor got free healthcare

    Hidden New York: a guide to places that matter

    Scouting New York

    http://ephemeralnewyork.files.wordpr...manmedbldg.jpg (large image)
    http://ephemeralnewyork.wordpress.co...de-hts/page/2/

  14. #44
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Everett Building
    Built: 1908
    Designed by: Goldwin Starrett & Van Vleck
    Address: 39-45 East 17th Street
    Landmark status: designated September 6th, 1988;
    LPC Report 1988


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/8742248@N07/4119124030/


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/edenpictures/2963577204/


    ca 1909, by Irving Underhill
    http://www.shop-com.co.uk/cc.class/c...8783&ccsyn=261


    much larger version at Forgotten Delights blog

  15. #45
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Walkabout: Terra-Cotta Revisited


    Clock face and ornament. Brooklyn Historical Society, formerly Long Is. HS, George Post, architect. 1878-81.
    Terra-cotta designed by Truman Hiram Bartlett. Pierrepont St. Brooklyn Heights.


    Terra-Cotta tiles. Bethel Seventh Day Adventist Church, originally Church of Our Father.
    Grand St at Lefferts Place. Clinton Hill. 1885.
    Architect Unknown.


    Terra-Cotta frieze. Residence, at 7th Ave and President St. Park Slope.


    Terra-Cotta lattice and ornament. Alhambra Apartments. Nostrand Ave, Bedford Stuyvesant.
    Montrose Morris, architect. 1889-90.


    Terra-Cotta grotesque mask and surrounding ornament. Washington Ave, at Greene. Clinton Hill.
    Adam E Fischer, architect. 1887.


    Many more photos here.


    My first post for Walkabout with Montrose, (anniversary coming up in March!) was a piece on terra-cotta and carved stone trim. Since that time, my camera and I have been wandering around, and I thought this would be a good time to go into more detail about this most ancient of building materials.


    As most people know, terra-cotta is simply translated “burnt earth”, a term the Romans used to describe glazed or unglazed fired clay used primarily as architectural elements, statuary and urns. Susan Tunik, in her seminal book, Terra-Cotta Skyline, which is the bible of New York City’s terra-cotta heritage, and the source of much of my information, calls our city “the clay jungle”, as opposed to the usual “concrete jungle”, because there is such a richness of terra-cotta ornament here. Terra-cotta started to show up on Manhattan facades in the late 1840’s, and was widely used for ornament starting in the 1880s, and was an important part of ornament during the Art Deco period of the 1920’s and 30’s. Brooklyn is home to examples that are monumental and important in the use of this versatile material, and full of smaller, yet wonderful, everyday examples that enhance and beautify the residential and commercial buildings we pass every day.

    In the beginning of the terra-cotta revival, in the late 1870’s, NY architects went to the fired clay manufacturers who were busy making fireclay brick, fire partitions, chimney pieces and gutters, because there were no decorative terra-cotta companies, and none located in New York City area.

    It didn’t take the manufacturers long to realize this new decorative market had unlimited potential. The Perth Amboy Terra-Cotta Company, in New Jersey was one of the closest to the city, and was responsible for the fine terra-cotta used on the façade of the Long Island Historical Society, in 1878-81. The New York Architectural Terra Cotta Company, located on the river’s edge of Long Island City, Queens, opened in 1889, and was soon the largest terra-cotta plant in the country, covering acres of river front.

    Today, only the landmarked office building, designed by the Montauk Club architect, Francis Kimball, remains as a reminder of this enormous plant. He must have been a frequent customer, as well, as the club is a terra-cotta wonder.

    With the invention of the elevator, and as building were getting taller, terra-cotta, as a lighter weight decorative building material, was seen as a viable alternative to stone. Terra-cotta’s fire resistant qualities also made it an excellent filler material for the new steel framed skyscrapers, but its widespread use met with resistance. Because most of the terra-cotta produced up to this time was a buff, stone color, many critics found terra-cotta’s ability to mimic stone to be cheating, and of course, stone cutters and carvers were worried that terra-cotta would drive them out of jobs.

    George Post, the architect of the Long Island Historical Society Building, was one of the first proponents of the use of natural red brick colored terra cotta, and the success of that building opened the floodgates of innovations to follow. It was a natural – brick buildings with brick colored terra-cotta. Let the imagination run wild!

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownston...bout_terra.php

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. New York City Books
    By Merry in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 172
    Last Post: October 5th, 2015, 11:41 PM
  2. Should New York State and City Split?
    By Agglomeration in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 107
    Last Post: January 8th, 2010, 09:48 AM
  3. New York City Burgers
    By amigo32 in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 66
    Last Post: December 8th, 2008, 09:20 AM
  4. Christmas Trees of New York City
    By noharmony in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: November 10th, 2006, 03:08 AM
  5. New York City Photos - 2003 Calendar
    By Merry in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: January 13th, 2003, 05:26 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software