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Thread: Rio gets the 2016 Summer Olympics.

  1. #91

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    Its great, surely one of the greatest locations for a city for beauty and lifestyle...

    Why should Cape Town get 2020? Wouldn't that be a big risk right after RIO, without knowing how RIO went? I'd say Cape Town in 2024/2028.

    Despite the beauty there, I'm a skyscraper guy, so I'll take Chongquing over RIO anyday

  2. #92
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Default shhhhhh...

    Don't anyone let Michelle see this:


  3. #93

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    Barack, you dog.

    In 1973, Soviet Premier Leonid Brezhnev visited the US. He took a liking to Jill St john, who had played Tiffany - the girl with the cassette tape not very well hidden in her bikini - in the 007 film Diamonds Are Forever.


  4. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by OmegaNYC View Post



    Oh btw, this young lady, would be legal by 2016.
    That's a great photo of Obama and Sarko checking out the merchandise!

  5. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    Don't anyone let Michelle see this:

    Michelle has quite a serious "booty" herself. I'd love to see her in a thong.

  6. #96

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    Quote Originally Posted by futurecity View Post
    Its great, surely one of the greatest locations for a city for beauty and lifestyle...

    Why should Cape Town get 2020? Wouldn't that be a big risk right after RIO, without knowing how RIO went? I'd say Cape Town in 2024/2028.

    Despite the beauty there, I'm a skyscraper guy, so I'll take Chongquing over RIO anyday
    As far as I'm aware, Africa has never had the Olympics, and it should. Cape Town seems like it would be the safest place to have it.

  7. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis View Post
    Uh, because the end result is all that matters. The whole reason the game is played is so you can differentiate winners from losers. If your team played terribly but still won, heh, who cares, you got the win! If they play wonderfully but still lose than....well they're still losers.
    I visit the home games of FC Oss, our local professional team, and probably the smallest in our country in terms of fanbase, history and money, and playing on the 2nd highest level. I don't expect them to become champions. A couple of years ago, in the playoffs they had the chance to go to to the highest level, but I'm glad they didn't, it would have been disastrous for the club. And one of the matches I've enjoyed the least was when they were leading with 3-0 after only 20 minutes, with 70 very long and boring minutes left. I do expect them to fight every second of the game, and get the best result possible. If they gave 110 percent, but lost because the opponent was simply better, I don't have the slightest problem with that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Travis View Post
    The reason it's got the name "Football" has much to do with the history of the sport. But I suspect you already knew that.
    Well, unfortunately I don't know. It probably has it's roots in English rugby I guess, and those guys actually do use their feet, maybe that's it?

    Here in the Netherlands (and probably most of Europe) we're simply not familiar with the sport. Most people here think it's kind of lame, not a lot of action, and all those guys in those ridiculous outfits. But I guess you just need to understand the sport to learn to appreciate it, it's much more about tactics than our football (I'm sorry, but I refuse to use the word soccer), most people just don't see that aspect of the game.

    Also, there's hardly anything about it here on television, only the Superbowl is being broadcasted live, but that's in the middle of the night when nobody is watching. And since they canceled the NFL Europe, it also isn't played here anymore at any serious level. Here in the Netherlands it has been the 2nd largest sport in terms of audience, but that was mostly because of all the free tickets they gave away (we Dutch like anything that's free....).

    However, since a couple of weeks I got ESPN on tv, so I finally have a chance to see some more of it. So far, I haven't been disappointed...

    Back on-topic: after those pictures posyted by londonlawyer, I'm really looking forward for the Games in Rio. Why not just skip London 2012?

  8. #98

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    Soccer is an english term originally, we just adopted it....we didn't make it up..we use it to differentiate, since NFL is the top dog it gets to keep the name football.

  9. #99

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    Soccer is generally never used in the UK. It would get you some funny looks.

  10. #100
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Online Etymology Dictionary

    football

    the open-air game, first recorded 1409; forbidden in a Scottish statute of 1424. The first reference to the ball itself is 1486. Figurative sense of "something idly kicked around" is first recorded 1532. Ball-kicking games date back to the Roman legions, at least, but the sport seems to have risen to a national obsession in England, c.1630. Rules first regularized at Cambridge, 1848; soccer (q.v.) split off in 1863. The U.S. style (known to some in England as "stop-start rugby with padding") evolved gradually 19c.; the first true collegiate game is considered to have been played Nov. 6, 1869, between Princeton and Rutgers, at Rutgers, but the rules there were more like soccer. A rematch at Princeton Nov. 13, with the home team's rules, was true U.S. football. The earliest recorded application of the word football to this is from 1881.

    soccer

    1889, socca, later socker (1891), soccer (1895), originally university slang, from a shortened form of Assoc., abbreviation of association in Football Association (as opposed to Rugby football); cf. rugger, but they hardly could have taken the first three letters of Assoc.

    rugby

    1864, after Rugby, public school where the game was played, from city of Rugby in Warwickshire, central England. The place name is Rocheberie (1086) "fortified place of a man called *Hroca;" with second element from O.E. burh (dat. byrig), replaced by 13c. with O.N. -by "village" due to the infl. of Dan. settlers. Otherwise it might be *Rockbury today. First element perhaps rather O.E. hroc "rook." Rugby Union formed 1871. Slang rugger for "rugby player" is from 1893.

  11. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    "stop-start rugby with padding"


    Interesting link by the way!

  12. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alonzo-ny View Post
    So what are all those stadiums and TV networks for? Why not just play in an empty building and then publish the results. You can read the score without the bother of actually watching the game.
    While you were trying to be glib you would be surprised at how many in the US would be perfectly happy with that. For them the game is merely a way to get statistics that can be discussed and plugged into formulas. Get a couple of baseball stat nerds going and you could be there all night.

    Quote Originally Posted by WizardOfOss View Post
    Well, unfortunately I don't know. It probably has it's roots in English rugby I guess, and those guys actually do use their feet, maybe that's it?
    The history is rather confusing. At one time there were several games, developed at individual universities, that got combined into one. "Football" was the most popular of these and, since kicking was still the primary way of scoring and the center hiked the ball using his foot, it was retained as the name to give it household recognition. Eventually rule changes, such as introducing down & distance rules and the forward pass, morphed the game into what it is today. The name, however, stayed the same and since we had inherited the name "soccer" for the other "football" there wasn't any confusion over which sport was which.

    Quote Originally Posted by WizardOfOss View Post
    Here in the Netherlands (and probably most of Europe) we're simply not familiar with the sport. Most people here think it's kind of lame, not a lot of action, and all those guys in those ridiculous outfits. But I guess you just need to understand the sport to learn to appreciate it, it's much more about tactics than our football (I'm sorry, but I refuse to use the word soccer), most people just don't see that aspect of the game.
    Yes, it, along with baseball, is a very tactic oriented game. Those who enjoy the spectator aspects of the two sports usually do so to analyze the tactics being used and try to predict the tactics that will be used next (and what might be done to counter them). Basketball and soccer are appreciated for very different reasons as there tactics is usually about trying to match up particular athletes against each other.

  13. #103
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    I think Football (american) was probably more interesting before it became so specialized. There were fewer odd rules in the game, less padding, and guys that were strong, but not Herculean.

    Baseball was more of a pasttime. It is a "team" but most of it depended on individual performances. It is not as much of an actively interactive competition as Football, Hockey or Soccer.

    Basketball is just a weird one that seems to have developed in the street (get a ball, a basket, and see if you can get the ball IN the basket. Simple enough). Rules evolved as the play progressed. Again, the specialization of the sport has turned it superhuman with common rules not making much sense anymore (10' net height when the guys can almost jump up and sit on it).

    MOST sport is pretty pointless. It is either a participatory competition that is the human equivalent to rams butting heads or dogs fighting. The only difference being that with most things human, we have seperated it "intellectually" from the base instincts of Male Superiority (Alpha Male) and pack instinct (teams).

    Trying to figure out why so many violent incidents happen after soccer games as opposed to any other sport is difficult though. I think it may be because of the dirth of other sporting events actively followed in Europe (and other areas). Crickit (sp) has a devoted following, but I do not think it has the same impetus as Soccer. This unilateral devotion has a tendency to breed rivalries that fester over time as people overpersonify and become too closely attached to the outcome of a favorite team.

    While this may have had some meaning back when the people of those teams were comprised mainly of locals, relatives, or townsfolk, it bears almost no heft now when the people that are supposedly "representing" you have almost NO contact or connection with you, your family, your locality or anyone you know.

    Team play sports will always be like his, so long as we have these instincts and our newfound global interconnectivity.



    Back to OT. WAY back I forget who posted it, but my post about NYC's identity being at odds with an olympic bid was challanged in that other major cities have also hosed teh games with "no problem".

    I just don't know. I looked at the plans for the games and I was unimpressed. I knew the neighborhoods, and knew how much of a PITA it would be to get from A to B to Q if you had to. An Olympic village, in my mind, should not have you skipping halfway across town because they thought that Archery was just not important enough to include on the main site.

    As for bringing up LA, no comparison. NY is as similar to LA as Newark is to San Fran. They are not OPPOSITES, tehy are just not directly comparable on many levels.

    As for Obama going to try to back the bid, I thought that was just plain silly. That should have been Biden or Michelle, not the Big Man. I know you have to show you are concerned about world events that are less arduous than War or Recession, but something on this level is too sticky to start putting your hands into it.

  14. #104

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    October 21, 2009
    Violence in the Newest Olympic City Rattles Brazil
    By ALEXEI BARRIONUEVO

    RIO DE JANEIRO — Just over two weeks ago, this striking city landed the 2016 Olympic Games, the first ever in South America, setting off a sweaty, impromptu beach party that lasted most of the weekend. President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva of Brazil sobbed with happiness. Rio’s residents glowed with pride.

    Then over the weekend, in a chilling outburst of violence, drug traffickers wielding what the police say they believe was a large-caliber weapon shot down a police helicopter just one mile from Maracana stadium, where the opening and closing ceremonies of the Olympics will be held and the World Cup final will be played two years before the Olympics.

    Suddenly, the celebration has been overwhelmed by hand-wringing that Rio’s chronic drug violence, its Achilles’ heel, is being laid bare before the world, and at a particularly inopportune time. Brazilian leaders are touring the world, searching for the investors needed to pay for the billions of dollars in infrastructure required for the events.

    The images of the downed police helicopter “really shocked Brazilians, and now everyone is worried about what will happen with the Games,” said Nadine Matos, 21, who works at a hair salon a block from Copacabana Beach. “We need to tell the world where we stand so that people outside Brazil understand what measures we are taking and are not so worried when planning to come down here.”

    For years, the police essentially abandoned the shantytowns, or favelas, that ring the city’s wealthier neighborhoods, following a policy that resembled containment more than enforcement. That allowed drug traffickers to create strongholds where violence is pervasive. And as the downing of the helicopter illustrated, the police have not done enough to slow the flow of weapons into the favelas.

    “We never hid our problems during the candidacy process,” Rio’s mayor, Eduardo Paes, said in London, where he was on the first leg of a trip in search of investors for the public works projects. “We always said to people that we were still facing problems. We still have a lot to do, we have a long road ahead of us and what happened this weekend showed that.”

    This year the government has tried a community policing approach to stemming the violence and cracking down on the traffickers in dozens of shantytowns, where about a third of Rio’s six million residents live. But the effort involves only five favelas so far, and the weekend of mayhem has set off a new round of debate here about whether the more militaristic strategy that has long prevailed has been useful.

    The police said the weekend’s violence started after a trafficker in prison ordered his followers to invade a rival’s territory. The attack set off clashes between the police and drug bandits in several favelas, leaving at least 26 people dead, including three policemen and three bystanders.

    At least one member of the International Olympic Committee, which highlighted Rio’s security challenges as its chief concern before the vote on Oct. 2, was quick to point out that Rio was not the only city to endure violence after winning an Olympic vote. In 2005, a day after London was awarded the 2012 Games, terrorists set off bombs on London’s trains and buses, leaving 56 dead and about 700 wounded.

    With Brazil’s television talk shows and newspapers filled with commentary about the effect of the violence on Rio’s image, city and state leaders are suddenly being forced to defend their Olympic bid all over again.

    “We want to get to 2016 with a Rio de Janeiro in peace before, during and after the Games,” Sérgio Cabral, Rio’s governor, said Saturday.

    The awarding of the Olympics has been viewed here as a crowning achievement for the country and a personal triumph for Mr. da Silva. But on Monday, he also found himself having to promise to provide additional money from the federal government in the next few months to beef up security in Rio.

    “I need to clean the filth that drug traffickers impose on Brazil,” he said.

    Rio has one of the world’s highest murder rates, with 4,631 homicides in the metropolitan area last year; that number represented a decline from 5,143 murders in 2006, government figures show. There were 523 murders in New York City last year.

    With the community policing effort, police officers try to establish a more permanent presence within the shantytowns. That differs from the prevailing approach for more than a decade, in which the police guarded the entrances to the favelas and ventured in only for select operations that often turned into deadly gun battles with traffickers.

    Though the community policing effort has so far been limited, law enforcement experts said they were encouraged.

    “For the first time the police are not coming into the favelas shooting, and then leaving only to draw the hatred and scorn of the residents,” said Silvia Ramos, the coordinator of the Centro de Estudos de Segurança e Cidadania at the University of Cândido Mendes in Rio.

    Other analysts said they believed that the new approach needed to be accompanied by new housing and the building of avenues in the favelas to enable police cars to move in and out with ease.

    The weekend mayhem began when a gang members from Morro São João, backed up by about 200 men from other favelas, invaded the nearby Morro dos Macacos neighborhood, in the northern zone of Rio.

    The police waited for daylight before moving in to avoid civilian casualties, José Mariano Beltrame, Rio’s secretary of public security, told reporters.

    As officers moved in, gang members opened fire on a police helicopter, causing it to explode and crash. Three of the six officers on board were killed.

    Organizers of the Olympic bid promised the I.O.C. that Rio would improve its police forces by 2012 with additional training, technology and resources.

    Law enforcement experts are hoping that will mean that the Olympics will leave a legacy of improved policing in Rio.

    “Now the cost of security will be very high, but it will be worth it,” said Rodrigo Pimentel, a former police captain in the special operations unit of Rio’s Military Police. “Let’s be honest. One more helicopter that falls down in Rio de Janeiro or another slum invasion could seriously raise the chances of the Olympics and World Cup pulling out of Brazil.”

    Myrna Domit contributed reporting from Miami.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/21/wo...cas/21rio.html

  15. #105
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    The drug dealers were idiotic. They should be working their best to bring the Olympics in there as well. Many MANY new, albeit temporary, customers.

    Scaring people away will only cost them money in th elong run.


    Some drug dealers just have no appreciation for economics and advertising!!!!!

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