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Thread: East River Waterfront

  1. #181
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    After seeing a 100th similar rendering, I have to say I am officially over the industrial metal & wire / minimalist aesthetic with wild field plants / weeds. Can someone please come up with something different or go back and refresh an old design

  2. #182
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    With newly proposed sky gondola, you could get from Brooklyn to Manhattan in less than four minutes

    Real estate exec Daniel Levy of CityRealty wants to bring cable transit to New York

    by Katherine Clarke


    East River Skyway It would cost more than $75 million to bring the first route to life

    Your morning commute could make you soar, not sore.

    A top real estate executive from Brooklyn is proposing a high-speed sky gondola between the Brooklyn waterfront and Manhattan — a back-to-the-future form of mass transit that could ease congestion on ferries, subways and bridges.

    The so-called East River Skyway would be comprised of high-speed aerial cable cars, moving New Yorkers to Manhattan in less than four minutes. The cars could accommodate more than 5,000 people per hour in both directions.


    East River Skyway The views from the cable cars would be stellar

    "(It) would be a relatively inexpensive and quickly deployable solution," said Daniel Levy, president of East River Skyway and real estate website CityRealty. "It is essential to adapt New York City's transportation system to serve residents in these booming areas."

    Levy came up with the idea for the skyway while on a ski trip, he told the Daily News. He estimates that it would cost between $75 million and $100 million to build, including the cost of the stations — far less than a new or expanded subway line. The first leg of the system could be from Williamsburg to Lower Manhattan, Levy said.


    East River Skyway The East River Skyway would transport commuters from Brooklyn to Manhattan in less than four minutes

    Such gondola systems are popular worldwide — and here in New York, where the Roosevelt Island tramway has been in operation since 1976.

    Levy will present his idea at a Brooklyn real estate summit Tuesday, when he hopes to gather support.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/life-styl...icle-1.1940570

  3. #183
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    I saw the Gondola idea in the paper today, what a fantastic idea for Greenpoint & Williamsburg

  4. #184
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    The Missing Link

    AECOM designing new path to connect New York City's East River Esplanade.


    by Annie Bergelin


    Courtesy AECOM

    For years there has been an inconvenient gap in the East River Esplanade between East 37th and East 60th streets, disrupting what could be a contiguous promenade experience along the waterfront. The gap is there because of two major built projects that cause the north section to be disjointed from the south section. The first is FDR Drive, the brainchild of Robert Moses who gave preferential treatment to vehicular traffic along the East River. The second is the United Nations headquarters, an iconic Modernist building complex that trumps local land use in the interest of global alliances. Despite these two obstacles, AECOM has come up with a solution to bridge the gap on the East River Esplanade.

    The conceptual design work that AECOM has prepared for the New York City Economic Development Corporation (EDC) reveals that there will be a new piece of infrastructure dedicated to pedestrian and bicycle circulation decking over the water adjacent to the FDR Drive. The primary objective is to connect the north and south portions of the Esplanade, but the design team is using the opportunity to introduce other amenities as well.

    Gonzalo Cruz, a creative design director at AECOM and project manager for the Esplanade project, explained that the design seeks to develop easily accessible connections to the street grid, provide three programmatic nodes, and establish a “ribbon” of features to integrate the mile-long project as one cohesive design. Between 38th and 41st streets there is a recreation node designed for active uses such as children’s play areas and fitness equipment. At 48th Street there is a gathering node for passive recreation with an amphitheater seating area, shade trees, and a variety of seating options, including a bar area with benches and small gathering spaces. And at 53rd Street there is an environmental education node with educational signage and ecological plantings.




    Cruz pointed out that an increasing number of people want to ride bicycles in New York, either for recreation or commuting, therefore the city needs to build the infrastructure to facilitate that objective. The expanded esplanade will feature a bike lane separated from the pedestrian walkway to streamline north-south movement along the East Side of Manhattan.

    Developing ideas for the project has been a true collaborative effort, said Cruz. AECOM worked with various city agencies and community groups to determine how to deal with access, programming, and logistics. Internally, AECOM brought together their landscape design and planning team with the environmental design and marine engineering teams to solve the complex design problem.

    The goal is to design a project that benefits the local community, as well as the city at large, and Cruz believes that they have been successful thus far with the conceptual design. Cali Williams, vice president of EDC, agrees. “We’re proud of the open engagement process that sought and subsequently applied the best ideas from both the design team and local community to achieve the highest standards of form and function,” said Williams.

    There is no set timeline to develop the project yet, but planning is underway. For those of us who long for the landscape-oriented transformation of the New York City waterfront, this project cannot come soon enough.




    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articl...4#.VBwoMxZuW3w

  5. #185

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    They would still need to do something just south of Stuyvesant Cove, where the power plant is...there it bottlenecks to a single file path, hemmed in with fences right up against the highway.
    It's tight enough to make it difficult to even push two bikes past each other.

  6. #186
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    Revitalizing the East River

    Mathews Nielsen's phased approach to transforming Manhattan's Upper Esplanade.

    by Alan G. Brake


    The designers proposed a series of temporary and permanent improvements. Courtesy Citvas/Mathews Nielsen

    Reclaiming the waterfront as public open space has been one of the most prominent and transformative design initiatives in New York City for the past decade. In 2011, the East River Esplanade became a focal point of that vision when CIVITAS, a non-profit neighborhood advocacy organization, sponsored the competition Reimagining the Waterfront. The competition solicited ideas to redesign the East River Esplanade between East 60th and 125th Streets, and drew in more than 90 submissions by landscape architects and designers, setting high expectations for a challenging sliver of the city.

    Adjacent to the Esplanade is the FDR Drive, a six-lane highway skirting the eastern Manhattan shoreline that leaves little space for recreational or ecological activity between the land and the water. The existing East River Esplanade is usable, but its cracked sidewalks, empty tree pits, and crumbling pieces of the seawall reveal deteriorating conditions and make for an unpleasant experience in the park. Moreover, rising sea levels will eventually submerge parts of the Esplanade.


    CIVITAS focuses on planning, zoning and environmental issues that improve quality of life in their catchment area, the Manhattan neighborhoods of East Harlem and the Upper East Side. Building on the momentum generated by the competition, CIVITAS received a New York Community Trust grant and retained Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects to do a feasibility study and explore design solutions for implementation within the complicated regulatory framework and physical constraints of the site.


    CIVITAS Project Manager for the Esplanade, Maura Smotrich, explained that there are several other non-profits, institutional organizations, and community groups with a vested interest in the waterfront design, and the best way to promote the transformation is to advance the design development through a community based planning initiative. Mathews Nielsen distilled months of analysis to develop a comprehensive study of the site and preliminary design solutions. They found the key issues to be the noise from the highway, the condition of the esplanade, the quality of the experience, identity, connectivity and sea level rise/flooding. They also came up with short-, medium- and long-term opportunities and presented their ideas at two CIVITAS sponsored community educational meetings.

    Signe Nielsen, principal at Mathews Nielsen, explained that the short-term opportunities are site-specific design interventions that could make a big impact right away, while also acting as catalysts to transform the entire project area over the long term. One of the obvious choices is to establish a boating node where 96th street meets the river. Currently there is a simple boat hoist that is used to take small paddleboats in and out of the water, so there is already a constituency with a specific vested interest in that node.

    Now the challenge is to find funding to implement the transformation that everyone agrees is necessary. Considering the current focus on waterfront landscape design in New York, including AECOM’s esplanade to the South, Nielsen believes that the tide is turning in their favor, and hopes that New Yorkers will support the proposed landscape improvements. The next iteration of Mathews Nielsen’s designs will be presented at the third CIVITAS sponsored community educational meeting on September 22. CIVITAS has already applied for another grant to continue their community based planning initiative, and they intend to keep the inspired vision of Reimaging the Waterfront alive until it eventually becomes reality.

    Nodes & Program


  7. #187
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    The East Side Waterfront's Radical Green Makeover, Revealed

    February 6, 2015, by Shannon Ayala


    A "living shoreline" in the 96th Street to 125th Street section of the esplanade.
    All renderings courtesy of Civitas and Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects.

    East River tributaries heading down Upper Manhattan side streets were just a conversation starter. Now, a campaign to improve a neglected stretch of the East River Waterfront Esplanade along the Upper East Side and East Harlem has moved from lofty visions to really pretty ones that might actually happen. Citizens group Civitas presented new designs for its Reimagining the Waterfront campaign last night at an event hosted by Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer's office. Backed by various statements of support by elected officials, Civitas released a report with designs by landscape architect firm Mathews Nielsen to transform the waterfront from 60th Street to 125th Street.


    Landscaping beneath the FDR from 63rd Street to 81st Street

    The designs come after a period of community outreach, which followed a design competition. The top winner of the competition, announced in April 2012, featured outlets for the river to flow down various side-streets aligned with lush greenery. Now things are getting real. "Many of the competition entries were very fantastical," said Emma Marconi Bologna, Civitas executive director. "What we're suggesting are improvements that are realistic and based on the community's input."


    A beach at Andrew Haswell Green Park near the Queesnboro Bridge at 60th Street.


    Eventually, the beach at Andrew Haswell Green Park could be expanded into a grassy park.

    But some of the concepts from the competition submissions aren't a far leap from what is now proposed, including ways to clean the river, said Signe Nielsen, principal at Mathews Nielsen. "We cannot build this river shoreline without demonstrating that we're going to improve water quality and the larger habitat," she said, "because crudely put, we are filling the river." The new designs go further to also protect the city from the river. "The whole competition was pre-Sandy," Nielsen said. She added that the infill will be as far out as the land was centuries ago. Some of that expansion will be wetland, emulating an older Mannahatta. The renderings are marked in the bottom right-hand corners S, M or L for short, medium and long-term feasibility. So a beach by the Queensborough Bridge is short term while a really nice lawn and walkway in the same location will take a little more time.


    John Jay Park between 76th and 78th Street could eventually be expanded with green space built over the FDR.

    The section of the of the esplanade that Civitas seeks to reform between 60th and 125th Street is literally crumbling into the river and hasn't gotten the same TLC as sections to the south and on the west side. But things are starting to happen for the uptown esplanade. Last year, the Mayor and City Council tucked away a $35 million fix for the decrepit pathway in the 2015 fiscal budget, and Rockefeller University pledged $8 million toward improvements. And this week a report from Assemblyman Robert Rodriguez proposed investing $500,000 towards better benches and launching commercial activity on the 107th Street pier. Still, those actions are cosmetic compared to the park that Civitas and other supporters want to extend over the FDR.


    Rendering of a re-opened Pier 107.

    Though much has been done to reimagine the upper esplanade nothing bureaucratic is in site yet. The phase that starts now involves exploring three key parts of the plan, including: temporary reopening of the 107th Street Pier; the 96th Street boat storage and "esplanade gateway"; and the possibility of an "ecological edge" running from roughly 96th Street to 116th Street. Opening Pier 107 is the most popular and feasible, Maura Smotrich, Esplanade Project Manager of Civitas said. Smotrich said there is no timeline and didn't give benchmark goals. There is also no cost estimate as of yet.


    Diagrams showing how Pier 107 could evolve.


    A possible future for Pier 107.


    The existing Carl Schurz Park esplanade from 81st Street to 90th Street...


    ...could be easily transformed with landscaping and seating.


    Thomas Jefferson Park between 111th and 116th streets could be completely
    transformed with a land bridge built over the FDR.


    Existing conditions of Thomas Jefferson Park. The following three photos show its possible transformation.






    Reimagine the Waterfront [official]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2015/0...r_revealed.php

  8. #188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    Integrated bicycle & pedestrian paths like this are a death wish. They absolutely must design dedicated bike lanes

  9. #189

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    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    Integrated bicycle & pedestrian paths like this are a death wish. They absolutely must design dedicated bike lanes
    Seriously, did they not even look at the Hudson River paths?

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