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Thread: East River Waterfront

  1. #76
    Jersey Patriot JCMAN320's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GordonGecko View Post
    I think the primary reason is the sheer volume of people + consumable products/disposable packaging versus the availability of empty garbage cans, many of which are often filled to the brim. But there's also a big group of people that are just lazy slobs that have never been held accountable and just dump their trash wherever they're finished with it.
    I agree with you completely. The receptacles are not emptied often enough and are too small to hold the amount they are expected too. In JC they have just begun installing hundreds of these new garbage cans that double as trash compactors and are solar powered. Well see how these work and how long they work if they aren't vandalized.

  2. #77
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    It seems to me that tourists are worse offenders than locals when it comes to litter.

    I live in midtown, in an area frequented by loads of tourists, and I can tell you that many times I see tourists leaving their drinks or wrappers right where they were sitting...no attempt to walk it to the bin.

    Yesterday I saw two European guys take the sneakers they just bought from Niketown out of the boxes and leave the boxes and tissue right on the bench. They just don't care. Maybe they think we all do this?

    Several times I have cursed out these tourists, telling them people LIVE here...it is not Disney World...and would they like me to come to Europe and leave trash in their neighborhoods.

  3. #78
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Con Ed, U.N. moves boost East River park odds

    City plugs away at separate deals that could someday transform stretch of waterfront from East 38th to East 60th streets into green ribbon of park space

    By Theresa Agovino


    Efforts to create a bigger and more comprehensive park on Manhattan's East Side waterfront are progressing.

    The city will soon begin infrastructure work on an East River pier located between East 38th and East 41st streets that was once leased to Consolidated Edison Co. and could anchor around 34,000 square feet of new public space. The work, which will include rehabilitating the pier's piles and decking, will be funded by a $13 million payment from Con Edison that was part of earlier requirements under its previous lease.

    “Creating new waterfront access … will reconnect New Yorkers and visitors to the water, helping to reclaim New York City's standing as one of the world's premier waterfront cities,” said Seth Pinsky, president of the New York City Economic Development Corp., in a statement.

    A completion date for the revamped pier and new park space will be determined as the early design work progresses, an EDC spokesman said.

    Meanwhile, city and state legislators have moved a step closer on a highly complex urban redevelopment plan that ultimately would close a 21-block gap in the East Side waterfront promenade that runs between East 38th and East 60th streets. The plan involves, in part, razing a playground near East 42nd Street to construct a new tower for the United Nations and selling city-owned buildings that currently host U.N. offices.

    After receiving an official request from the City Council, the state Legislature last month passed a law that lets city and state officials sign a “memorandum of understanding” by Oct. 10 and allow for the future demolition of Robert Moses Playground so the United Nations could build a tower on the 29,000-square-foot blacktop. The park is on First Avenue, across East 42nd Street from the international body.

    The legislation is necessary because it takes state approval to eliminate a park, yet legislators won't be in session during the fall when the U.N. is expected to decide whether to move forward with the plan. The memorandum would allow local state representatives to require conditions be met before a deal could proceed. The plan would also be subject to the city's Uniform Land Use Review Procedure.

    The legislation has yet to be signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo. A call to a governor's spokesman wasn't immediately returned, but Mr. Cuomo is expected to sign the legislation.

    “We've written this legislation to allow a new phase of talks on projects that could be a huge boon for the community, the U.N. and the general public, but with ironclad assurances that nothing will be final until we work out the terms,” said state Rep. Brian Kavanagh, who represents neighborhoods on Manhattan's East Side.

    The City Council recently passed what is called a home rule message requesting the state to enact the legislation that would allow a deal to go through. “There is a limited opportunity here to craft an agreement that respects the community's need for open space and waterfront access and the United Nations' need for a new building,” said City Councilman Dan Garodnick. “We will spend the next number of months to see if we can strike a deal that works.”

    Meanwhile, the city last month tapped the firm AECOM to provide engineering, design and planning services for the project and study both its cost and feasibility. In the past, experts have estimated the project could cost between $150 million and $200 million. There is no funding for it currently.

    The broader plan to fill the riverside promenade's gap is also complicated. To fund the construction, the U.N. would pay about $75 million for the playground lot. The city would also sell two office buildings it now leases to the U.N., which sources told Crain's last year could fetch between $150 million and $300 million.

    Any deal faces substantial obstacles, however. It would require a wide variety of approvals and would have to be coordinated by multiple city, state and federal agencies.

    http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article...TATE/110709982

  4. #79
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Catching Up

    Three blocks of esplanade finally open on the East River.

    by Tom Stoelker


    The East River Waterfront Esplanade as seen from Pier 11. [Peter Mauss/Esto]

    With all eyes fixed on everything coming up roses on the West Side’s High Line, City Planning has been concentrating on the East. The long-term goal of connecting the lushly-landscaped promenades and bike paths of the West Side to the heavily trafficked spaghetti of the East Side moved a step closer with the opening on July 14 of the section from Pier 11 at Wall Street to Pier 15 at South Street Seaport. “After 9/11 we said that the most important thing for lower Manhattan is rebuilding and the transformation of the East River,” said City Planning commissioner Amanda Burden. The plans for the park are being developed with the New York City Economic Development Corporation and will ultimately extend up to Pier 35 just north of Manhattan Bridge.

    With much of the park sitting beneath the FDR Drive, the Esplanade will likely draw comparisons to the High Line for its embrace of infrastructure, though it’s literally the flipside. Here, it’s about being beneath, not above. “Embracing the FDR seems so obvious now, but it wasn’t so obvious then,” said Burden. “It provides important shade and it’s an organizing principle for all of the programming.”

    Left to right: The view from Wall Street; the seatwall with Riverside chair groupings; Ductile concrete seatwall with skateboard proof steel trim. (AN/Stoelker)



    While the overall look —a collaboration between SHoP Architects and landscape architect Ken Smith—is quite different from the High Line,, it establishes its own signature designs. So-called Get-Downs, bleacher-like stairways that drop down to water level and give visitors a chance to get their feet wet and feel the river spray, occur at several key spots, one directly across Wall Street, and allow uninterrupted sightlines. “We thought an important way to connect was that you could see the water all the way back into the city,” said SHoP’s Gregg Pasquarelli. “The railing drops so that the view corridors from the city are unobstructed.”

    A line of barstools sit up against ipe wooden rails providing another unimpeded perch. The rail is wide enough to support lunch or a book. The designers also used ipe for slats in two patterns for bench seating, inspired by shipping crates and pallets. At Burden’s insistence, seating is arranged in multiple groups of two or four, around chess tables, and, for the more harried New Yorker, alone.

    Left to right: Barstools' lunchtime perch; the veiw from the Ferry; The Dog Run's "Tree".


    Landscape architect Ken Smith sporadically arranged multi-hued grey hexagon pavers riffing on a highly pixilated photo of the water. He also designed a series of planting beds or “dunes” rising from six inches to about two feet high. The effect creates several berms at various angles that morph on one side into “seat walls” made of ductile concrete, edged in skateboard-proof stainless steel. “There’s an emphasis on native plants, while the modulated seating and dunes create a meandering walkway,” said Smith. In the dog run, Smith got to break out his pop art with a giant bone, towering tree stump, and bear-sized squirrel all made of concrete.

    This fall, the bi-level Pier 15 also by SHoP will be finished. The 517-foot-long upper pier features an extended lawn and small “forest,”while a maritime museum and café sit below. Next summer, at Maiden Lane a pavilion café, run by the same operator as the Pier 15 café, will open. The final phases of the project from Broad Street to Old Slip and from Pike and Allen Streets up to Pier 35 are expected to be completed in 2012 and 2013, respectively.

    http://archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=5536

  5. #80
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    " ... several berms at various angles that morph on one side into “seat walls” made of ductile concrete, edged in skateboard-proof stainless steel."

    This design feature, done very well by means of a strip of beefy L-shaped steel that wraps the entire edge and extends for the full length of the seating, is a very smart fix for this urban "problem" and hopefully will mean that these benches don't end up knicked and scarred like so many other stone seats seen all over town.

  6. #81

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    I still hope someday the city landfills some this stretch of river and create some kind of BPC-esque development.
    And with the FDR there, the park just feels underwhelming.

  7. #82
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Lighting up the underside of the newly painted FDR viaduct really makes the scene look neat at night.

  8. #83
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Residents Dream of Green Future for Derelict Murray Hill Pier

    By Mary Johnson

    MURRAY HILL — A decaying pier that stretches along the East River betwen 38th and 41st streets could soon be transformed to house a meandering bike path, community gardens, an urban farm, play areas and art.

    The proposal was one the ideas that emerged from a day-long brainstorming session hosted by the Municipal Art Society.

    The conference, at NYU Langone Medical Center Tuesday, brought together members of Community Board 6, residents, architects and elected officials to discuss hopes for the 34,000-square-foot pier, previously operated by Con Edison.

    Other ideas included adding a plant buffer to diminish some of the noise from the FDR, an amphitheater for public performances, a dog run, water access, an urban beach and an additional pedestrian access point that would cross the FDR from the north.

    Currently, the pier is only accessible from the south, at East 38th Street.

    “What you’re doing today is exactly the kind of real-life urban planning that translates into a better environment for our future,” said State Senator Liz Krueger in remarks at the beginning of the event. “We have an opportunity to put together very complex pieces of a jigsaw puzzle.”

    The situation is indeed complex, and it is just a small part of a longstanding plan to close the gap in the East River waterfront by extending the greenway from East 38th Street to East 60th Street.

    The main problem is funding. Con Edison paid the city $13 million to fulfill its lease agreement for the pier. That money is needed to fix the pier’s infrastructure.

    “It’s in terrible condition,” said Joshua R. Laird, assistant commissioner for planning and parklands for the New York City Parks Department.

    “We have a significant amount of money,” he added, referencing the $13 million from Con Edison. “But all of that will be needed just to essentially rebuild the pier.”

    City Council Member Daniel Garodnick said that $1 million of the city’s budget has been secured “to jumpstart creation of amenities in what will be our pier.”

    But that’s not a lot of money, as far as building waterfront is concerned.

    Laird, of the Parks Department, provided examples of the costs of other waterfront parks in New York. For example, the Riverside Park “Riverwalk,” which closed an eight-block gap in the West Side greenway from 83rd Street to 91st Street, cost about $430 per square foot, Laird said.

    The Riverwalk occupies about 33,000 square feet, which brings the total cost of that strip of greenway to more than $14 million.

    There’s also the potential for more funds, should the city and the United Nations come to terms on a land swap. But that too is controversial.
    Despite the heated topics involved, the groups participating in the event found common ground at many points throughout the day.

    Most agreed that adding an access point at East 41st Street was vital. Many suggested creating a conservancy or similar organization to help keep the pier clean and viable once it’s finished. Conference participants also wanted an identity for the park, a name and a brand.

    Near the end of the event, a man identifying himself as real estate mogul Sheldon Solow made a brief appearance. Solow, whose firm is developing a big chunk of land nearby, stood up and announced that he intends to transform one block in the area into a park.

    Solow said he would formally present his plans in a few days but did not offer further comment.

    The Municipal Art Society plans to take all the ideas presented at the conference on Tuesday and incorporate them into one vision for the East Side waterfront park, said Raju Mann, the director of planning for the society.

    Mann said the society will present that vision to the city in the hopes that resident input will be incorporated into the final design.

    “All these kinds of things in New York City take forever to build,” Mann said. “So you need a combination of perseverance and persistence to get this kind of stuff done.”

    In addition, the city has commissioned a feasibility study to be conducted for the entire swath of proposed greenway from East 38th Street to East 60th Street. The consultant running that study, AECOM, was also at the conference on Tuesday.

    “So they’re listening, which is great,” Mann said.

    For the participants, several said they enjoyed the brainstorming session. Joy Garland, a Stuyvesant Town resident and a member of Community Board 6, called it a “privilege.”

    “That’s the first word that comes to mind,” Garland said.

    Garland said she particularly enjoyed being included in the early stages of the planning process and interacting with individuals representing different aspects of that process.

    “It was a very holistic approach to planning,” Garland said.

    In addition to the conference, State Senator Liz Krueger, City Council Member Daniel Garodnick and Assemblyman Brian Kavanagh have launched a new website to keep the community informed about the waterfront project.

    The officials will also give residents an opportunity to provide their input on waterfront development plans at three public forums in August and September. The first forum is scheduled for August 4.

    “This is the beginning of the conversation,” Garodnick said.

    East Side residents have long envied the West Side waterfront for its Fairway grocery store and for its greenway, Garodnick joked.

    The East Side now has a Fairway. And its greenway is in the works.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20110727/murr...#ixzz1TOqkX88x

  9. #84
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Stuyvesant Cove Park Celebrates 10th Anniversary

    By Mary Johnson














    STUYVESANT TOWN — As debate continues over how the East River waterfront greenway will be developed, one success story is celebrating a milestone. This year marks the 10th anniversary of Stuyvesant Cove Park.

    The park, which occupies about two acres of riverfront where East 20th Street meets the FDR Drive, has had several past lives. It was once a concrete manufacturing plant and a parking lot.

    At one point during the 1980s, the land was slated to be turned into five residential towers that would have been built out onto the water and known collectively as Riverwalk.

    “For years, our community has wanted a park along the river,” said Joy Garland, executive director emerita of the Stuyvesant Cove Park Association.

    “When we heard about [the towers,] we said, ‘No, this is not what we want.'"

    The community banded together and formed an organization called Citizens United Against Riverwalk, Garland said. And in the end, their lobbying efforts succeeded in convincing the city to opt for a park instead of more apartments.

    Now, Stuyvesant Cove Park is full of native plants and is home to the city’s first stand-alone, solar-powered building, Solar 1, which serves as a green-energy education center.

    “It shows that nature is alive and thriving in New York City—an urban area—and that people come to the park to be renewed by what nature offers,” Garland said.

    Daisy Hoyt, the manager of Stuyvesant Cove Park, said she constantly sees picnickers, walkers and runners in the park.

    “It’s not very well-known in the city in general, but I think there's a lot of people in the neighborhood who use it on a regular basis,” Hoyt said.

    On Thursday, the park had a steady stream of visitors. Women pushed strollers along the meandering path. Teenagers clustered around the railing overlooking the East River, and joggers and bicyclists cruised down a dedicated two-lane path alongside the FDR.

    Some, like Susan Field, have lived in the area long enough to remember what it looked like before Stuyvesant Cove Park existed.

    “Before it was here, it was awful. You wouldn’t even come over here,” said Field, who has lived across the street from Stuyvesant Town for 25 years.
    “It was just kind of dirty and nasty,” she added.

    But on Thursday, she was sitting facing the East River with her dog Pepper at her feet. She said she has started coming to the park more often recently, about once or twice a month.

    She and her husband like to walk through the park and talk, said Field, a Protestant chaplain at New York University.

    But she said she also comes to pray and to spend some time outside with Pepper.

    Ron Reineke, a retired Vietnam vet who was born and raised on East 24th Street, sat and smoked as he stared out at the seaplanes taking off and landing in the East River.

    Thursdays, Fridays and Mondays are big days for the planes, he said, surmising millionaires traveling to and from the Hamptons were the cause.

    “I call him the Red Baron,” Reineke said, gesturing toward a bright red plane chugging along in the water.

    Currently, there are no events planned to celebrate the park's 10th anniversary, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be, Garland said.

    Two years after the park was built, community members, donors and elected officials held a dedication ceremony for it, said Garland.

    She has a photo of the event in her home, and she laughed as she recalled how everybody stood, scissors at the ready, just waiting to cut the ribbon.

    “We’re very lucky to have that park,” Garland said.

    http://www.dnainfo.com/20110729/murr...#ixzz1TZr8wqhX

  10. #85
    Forum Veteran macreator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merry View Post
    Near the end of the event, a man identifying himself as real estate mogul Sheldon Solow made a brief appearance. Solow, whose firm is developing a big chunk of land nearby, stood up and announced that he intends to transform one block in the area into a park.

    Solow said he would formally present his plans in a few days but did not offer further comment.
    I wouldn't believe this if it weren't for the fact that Solow is known to be a rather eccentric guy to put it mildly.

  11. #86

  12. #87

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    nice shot zippy

  13. #88

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    Something completely different.


  14. #89
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
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    Four girls, then four helicopters. Is there a theme going on here, Zip?

  15. #90

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    At dinner:

    "How was your day?"

    "Spent the afternoon at the East Side waterfront. Took a nice picture of helicopters."

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