Page 8 of 13 FirstFirst ... 456789101112 ... LastLast
Results 106 to 120 of 190

Thread: East River Waterfront

  1. #106
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,128

    Default

    hmm, a new 7 train stop - is that even feasable? You'd need elevators to access the platform and the construction would be tricky and disruptive to existing service. Not sure if it would be worth the cost

    But the most unlikely part of this is back filling the land between Roosevelt island and Manhattan island. I don't see that ever happening, they would also have to demo the bridge from Queens to RI to accomodate all the boat traffic or keep the drawbridge up almost permanently

  2. #107
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Funds Found to Boost Park In Manhattan

    By JOSH BARBANEL

    A plan to create a continuous waterfront park in Lower Manhattan between the Hudson and the East rivers is moving forward.

    The Bloomberg administration and local elected officials have reached an agreement to provide $14 million to demolish a 600-foot-long pier shed on the East River that formerly held bananas and coffee, and to draft plans to turn the site into a park.

    The huge space, known as Pier 42, was built in the 1960s to house newsprint shipped into the city. It is situated between the Williamsburg and Manhattan bridges, at the edge of a site where a larger, $140 million esplanade and pier project is planned along the East River.



    Officials have agreed to open up Pier 42 by using some of the last unspent funds from the $20.4 billion in federal aid provided to rebuild Lower Manhattan after the attacks on the World Trade Center in 2001.

    "This is the missing link in the dream of having a ribbon park around Lower Manhattan," said Sen. Charles Schumer, who has been pressing for the funding. He said the Lower Manhattan Development Corp. was due to take up the new funding plan at a meeting on Monday.

    The LMDC has been moving to reallocate unspent federal recovery funds to projects that can move forward despite the difficult economic environment.

    "We are committed to an East River esplanade that is every bit as wonderful as the Hudson River Park, and this is an important step," said David Emil, the LMDC's president.

    The $14 million will provide enough funds to demolish the building, which has been used in recent years as a parking garage and a storage site for movie productions. But it will not cover the cost of turning the pier into a park, which could cost a total of $40 million officials said.

    State Sen. Daniel Squadron, who represents the area, said the initial grant would provide funds to allow the Parks Department to conduct a "community-based master plan process" for the final design of the pier. He said the demolition would likely be completed next year.

    "It is a foot in the door," Mr. Squadron said.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...googlenews_wsj

  3. #108
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    East River Waterfront Plan Bobs Along, Slowly Forward

    by Dave Hogarty




    (click to enlarge)

    The Municipal Arts Society refuses to let its plan for a usable East River waterfront drown in a sea of inertia and a changing marketplace. At stake is the future of public access to Manhattan's East Side waterfront—currently under par with that offered by the West Side's Inwood-to-Battery Park greenway.

    The latest life preserver thrown to the now five-year-old MAS plan was the October deal to trade the Robert Moses Playground on 1st Avenue between 41st and 42nd Streets for $150 million in development funds and access to develop the East River's waterfront. Now there is some momentum forming around a first step to transform the old Con Ed pier at 38th-41st Streets into a public park. City Council member Dan Garodnick is a booster of the plan, who told the Observer, “The project is the first piece of what will eventually be a connected East River greenway, so it makes sense to focus on its design and purpose now.” That sentiment reinforced the latest announcement by The Municipal Art Society, which outlined a number of principles to which future waterfront planning should adhere.

    Observer article
    East Side Waterfront Park [MAS]
    New York's Next Great Waterfront Park [MAS]

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/1...ly_forward.php

  4. #109

    Default Three-Story Glass-Walled Structure May Replace Pier 17 Mall

    Three-Story Glass-Walled Structure May Replace Pier 17 Mall
    BY CARL GLASSMAN AND JESSICA TERRELL
    POSTED DEC. 14


    JESSICA TERRELL / TRIBECA TRIB
    According to preliminary plans shown to members of Community Board 1, this building on Pier 17 would be replaced with a glass enclosed structure that would provide unobstructed views of the East River and Brooklyn Bridge.
    A glass-walled, three-story structure with a roof garden and sweeping river views is the new vision for Pier 17 at the South Street Seaport.


    That’s the preliminary plan for a building on the pier that would replace the current mall, as described by Community Board 1 members who got a preview of the scheme. Those who saw the plans Wednesday, in a private presentation by SHoP Architects and the pier’s leaseholder, Howard Hughes Corp., said in interviews with the Trib that they liked what they saw.


    “Everybody was very impressed with the design,” said Bruce Ehrmann, a CB1 member and co-chair of the board’s Landmarks Committee. “The building is designed to have view corridors to the water instead of the big, bulky mall that’s there now.”


    The group saw renderings of designs that have yet to be made public.


    The CB1 members said the design calls for retail space on the mezzanine and third floor and an open ground-floor level with additional retail. "You can see through to the towers of the Brooklyn Bridge," said Paul Hovitz. "It gives you a sense of being able to enjoy the Seaport from the ground floor as opposed to a mall type entrance."


    Hovitz said that Christopher Curry, the Howard Hughes Corp. executive in charge of development, assured the group that the new building will not be a mall. "Their position was they are going to be looking for unique shops, services and restaurants," he said. "All of this sounds great."

    Representatives of the Howard Hughes Corp. did not return calls for comment.



    JESSICA TERRELL / TRIBECA TRIB
    The Beekman Beer Garden beach would be replaced by a public open space with trees and benches, according to preliminary plans presented by the Howard Hughes Corp.
    Unlike a previous plan, scrapped by the pier's former leaseholder, General Growth Properties, there is no tower attached to the proposal, according to the board members. Though pleased by that, they said they expect Howard Hughes to eventually propose a tall building for Pier 17 when financing becomes available.


    "You can’t just be doing one building without knowing what your master plan is for the rest of the pier,” said John Fratta, chair of CB1’s Seaport Committee. “I’m willing to bet there is going to be a high rise in the future.”


    CB1 members said they were told the new building would be 25,000 square feet larger than the 205,000 square foot building that is there now. Because it is within the South Street Seaport Historic District, it needs the approval of the Landmarks Preservation Commission. Ehrmann and his co-chair of CB1’s Landmarks Committee, Roger Byrom, said without a master plan it is premature to say whether they would favor approval of the design by the city’s Landmarks Commission. They also said the architects have yet to decide which of two glass “skins” or facades they will choose for the building. “It certainly has some of the right components,” Byrom said. “But it’s too early for us to make enough sense of it to comment.”


    The ground floor of the structure would be open on the sides, but have glass doors that swing down like garage doors to enclose the space in bad weather, Hovitz said.


    The upper levels would have glass walls, and one of the renderings showed cables providing support and giving a bridge effect to the design, according to Hovitz.


    On the north side of the mall, formerly the location of the Water Taxi Beach and currently the Beekman Beer Garden, Howard Hughes proposes to remove the sand and install trees and benches to create an open public space.


    “The way they showed this space it would be like a mini-park, which is really terrific,” Hovitz said.


    CB1 members said Howard Hughes intends to present more detailed plans publicly to the Community Board 1 in February. That would begin an approval process that is expected to take about a year. The company needs approval from both the city's Landmarks Preservation Commission and the City Planning Commission.

    Howard Hughes told the board that it hopes to complete the project in 2014.




    HomeLettersNews In BriefAdvertiseContact Us
    Copyright © 2009 The Tribeca Trib • 401 Broadway, 5th Floor • New York, NY • 10013 • 212.219.9709

  5. #110
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Slideshow> SHoP’s Pier 15 Opens to Public

    by Tom Stoelker


    The SHoP-designed Pier 15 opened to the public today. (Stoelker/AN)

    Before all eyes and ears were focused on the mayor’s announcement about Cornell and their EDC project upriver, AN was downtown for a much quieter opening of yet another EDC project. Without fanfare, the SHoP-designed Pier 15 opened to the public today. With the exception of another photographer and a family visiting from Spain, we were the only ones at the pier when the security guard unhooked the chain.


    Three arched lawns grace the pier's second level.

    Across from Maiden Lane, the new pier is an exercise in restraint with two reflective glass pavilions supporting the top half of a bi-level pier. Once common in the Victorian era, bi-level piers are rare today. The upper-level of this pier sports three small rolling lawns, slightly arched in profile, that overlook the East River.


    A long ramp leading to the upper level suggests a gangplank.

    The pier adds 50,000 square feet of public space to the East River Waterfront Esplanade. The project, a joint effort with City Planning, stretches from the Battery Park Maritime Building (the Governors Island ferry) to Pier 35, just north of the Brooklyn Bridge.


    The lower level pavilion reflects a fire boat spouting water.

    Of the two lower level pavilions, one will become a restaurant, to be run by the same company that operates as a smaller restaurant nearby in a pavilion on the East River Esplanade. The second lower level pavilion will accommodate services for a nearby marina. The RFP for the restaurant and marina have yet to be announced.

    With the work complete, South Street Seaport’s Pier 17 appears all the more needy. As AN‘s Eavesdrop column reported back in July, the city is still in the midst of negotiations with the Howard Hughes Corporation to revamp the dated pier/mall. SHoP’s Gregg Pasquarelli recently told New York magazine that the firm relishes tackling the next stop north.


    Crossed red wooden slats beneath of the upper deck suggest the curve of a ship's hull.

    more pics at ArchPaper

  6. #111
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    The pier looks great. Gotta get over there. Sorry to see that you can't have a drink up there, as it is screaming for a beer while looking out over the water.

    Meanwhile this will have to suffice:


  7. #112
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Mind the Gap

    Park joins New York's long-divided Upper East Side and East Harlem riverfronts.

    by Tom Stoelker


    A view south on the East River Esplanade. Tom Stoelker / AN

    After the city sealed the deal to sell Robert Moses Playground to the United Nations to finance the waterfront park between 38th Street and 60th Street, the East River Greenway moved a step closer to completion. But once the Greenway links upriver at 60th Street, a host of issues await. There, stretching from 60th to 125th, the 60-year-old East River Esplanade languishes.
    The esplanade runs approximately two miles between the Upper East Side and East Harlem gradually shifting from lush and refined at Gracie Mansion to rough and tumble at the 96th Street divide, long a psychological demarcation between the haves and have-nots.

    In late October, citizen action group CIVITAS announced its Reimagining the Waterfront ideas competition charging architects, planners, and landscape designers to develop concepts for the entire esplanade, or in sections. According to executive director Hunter Armstrong, key challenges are a dangerous crosswalk at the 96th Street entrance and two vacant lots beneath the FDR. As with SHoP’s redesign of the East River Esplanade in Lower Manhattan, Armstrong envisions a park that embraces the highway, both beside and beneath.




    A detail of the area to be redesigned with access points noted (top) and a proposed 111th Street bridge crossing the FDR (bottom).
    Courtesy CIVITAS and Guy Nordenson

    At a kickoff event, CIVITAS invited Columbia professor Phillip Lopate, author of the 2004 book Waterfront, to lure Upper Eastsiders into a conversation at the ornate Park Avenue Armory about a future for the waterfront and 96th Street. “It’s kind of choppy over there,” he told AN. “It’s beginning to be gentrified, but not at the far east end—not that gentrification is the solution.”

    Besides by means of 96th Street, East Harlem has access to the esplanade via three caged-in pedestrian bridges. Lopate suggested that something less stark, like a platform over the highway, similar to East Side’s Carl Schurz Park, “something that’s not punitive,” he said.

    On a tour of the esplanade’s north half with Armstrong, views were stunning, but the promenade itself was bleak. Teens smoked pot near the Wards Island Bridge, now shuttered for repairs until early 2012. A series of sinkholes crumbled into the river, and rusted railings sat on decaying concrete. The charming 107th Street Pier with its cast iron railings sat empty except for one senior. On exiting the esplanade at the 120th Street overpass, a fistfight threatened the tour as Armstrong quickly redirected attention to the subject to the new CUNY buildings by SLCE, snazzy condos, a convent, and the original Patsy’s pizza parlor.

    The lower section of the promenade below 96th Street may not face the same social challenges, but the promenade infrastructure is just as bad. John Natoli, chief engineer at Parks, said that every few hundred feet the support systems change from traditional pile supports, to log-cabin cribbed wood pilings, and concrete blocks sitting atop landfill.

    the 107th Street pier (left), one of many sink holes along the northern section (Center), and remnants of industry along the esplanade (right).
    Tom Stoelker / AN




    For years, the esplanade’s jurisdiction remained convoluted, with Parks, the DOT, and DEP randomly dashing in to make repairs. Upper East Side Council Member Jessica Lappin credited Parks for “graciously accepting responsibility.” Natoli described the problem: “In some cases, we’re doing fixes that wouldn’t be right, but we have only limited funds. We know it needs tens of millions but we only have thousands.” Based on $68 million worth of comparable work at the East River Park below 14th Street, Natoli guesstimated that an uptown revamp could exceed $100 million. CIVITAS hopes the competition will help jumpstart some financing once the ideas start to flow, and the community gets excited.

    Council Member Lappin’s office has already allocated $1.4 million toward renovation and repair, of which $500,000 went toward studying the infrastructure. There are bright spots. “Con Edison owns a building in the 70s and they may be willing to give that land over to the city,” said Lappin. To the north, the CIVITAS competition has the support of Council Member Melissa Mark-Viverito, who also happens to chair City Council’s Parks and Recreation Committee. Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney is also on board. The deadline for the competition is January 15, 2012.

    http://www.archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=5814

  8. #113

    Default New Pier 15 Open

    Today.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0011.jpg 
Views:	104 
Size:	51.5 KB 
ID:	14612   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0012.jpg 
Views:	113 
Size:	46.8 KB 
ID:	14613   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0016.jpg 
Views:	99 
Size:	55.5 KB 
ID:	14614   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0017.jpg 
Views:	120 
Size:	54.6 KB 
ID:	14615   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0018.jpg 
Views:	111 
Size:	43.5 KB 
ID:	14616  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0019.jpg 
Views:	100 
Size:	33.9 KB 
ID:	14617   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0021.jpg 
Views:	94 
Size:	72.1 KB 
ID:	14618   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0023.jpg 
Views:	89 
Size:	84.4 KB 
ID:	14619   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0024.jpg 
Views:	103 
Size:	65.5 KB 
ID:	14620   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0026.jpg 
Views:	111 
Size:	62.0 KB 
ID:	14621  


  9. #114

    Default more from today

    .
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0034.jpg 
Views:	84 
Size:	70.9 KB 
ID:	14624   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0033.jpg 
Views:	90 
Size:	75.6 KB 
ID:	14623   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0029.jpg 
Views:	96 
Size:	80.9 KB 
ID:	14622   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0036.jpg 
Views:	98 
Size:	86.4 KB 
ID:	14625   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0040.jpg 
Views:	113 
Size:	85.7 KB 
ID:	14626  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0043.jpg 
Views:	117 
Size:	54.4 KB 
ID:	14627   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0045.jpg 
Views:	96 
Size:	52.7 KB 
ID:	14628   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0050.jpg 
Views:	97 
Size:	64.0 KB 
ID:	14629   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0051.jpg 
Views:	97 
Size:	60.3 KB 
ID:	14630   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0053.jpg 
Views:	92 
Size:	54.9 KB 
ID:	14631  


  10. #115

    Default and even more...

    .
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0060.jpg 
Views:	112 
Size:	64.4 KB 
ID:	14634   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0057.jpg 
Views:	91 
Size:	60.3 KB 
ID:	14633   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0055.jpg 
Views:	88 
Size:	41.5 KB 
ID:	14632   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0061.jpg 
Views:	91 
Size:	53.5 KB 
ID:	14635   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0063.jpg 
Views:	94 
Size:	54.9 KB 
ID:	14636  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0064.jpg 
Views:	96 
Size:	80.1 KB 
ID:	14637   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0066.jpg 
Views:	93 
Size:	50.1 KB 
ID:	14638   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0067.jpg 
Views:	230 
Size:	64.4 KB 
ID:	14639   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0074.jpg 
Views:	107 
Size:	58.2 KB 
ID:	14640   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_0075.jpg 
Views:	101 
Size:	67.4 KB 
ID:	14641  


  11. #116
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Sherpa: I was at Pier 15 today around 2:30; seems we were there about the same time: I saw the guy in the yellow vest in your first photo; he was there taking photos for Turner Construction with a much better camera than mine (he showed me some great shots taken at dusk there a couple of days ago).

    This new Pier 15 is fantastic. The red of the slatted ceiling matches the red hull on the big ship next door and the way that ceiling is constructed, with waves and oscillations, it appears to be an inverted mirror image of the ship's hull. Of course the views are fantastic. When the new restaurant just to the south opens (it looks like it's almost done: They're laying the floors now) then this whole stretch of river front will be a fantastic destination. Enjoy it now before everybody else discovers it!

  12. #117
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Manhattan - South Village
    Posts
    4,240

    Default

    The new pier is fantastic. Nice that so much of it accessible - no playground, ball court, excessive plantings - with lots of seating, spectacular views, tall ships right there, and it's even better at night, especially the red slats lit from behind. Great addition to the Seaport area.

  13. #118
    NYC Aficionado from Oz Merry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default

    Reinventing the East Side Waterfront

    By LISA W. FODERARO



    ONE by one, the announcements have come. Of a deal to convert Pier 42, located between the Williamsburg and Manhattan Bridges, from a storage facility into open space. Of design guidelines for Waterside Pier, a former Consolidated Edison site along the East River in Midtown, released in December by the Municipal Art Society. Of the opening of Pier 15, a block below South Street Seaport, which offers double-decker views of the East River.

    These are but a sampling of the steady drumbeat of news items — real estate deals, park restorations, reclaimed piers and new esplanades — that herald the remaking of Manhattan’s East Side waterfront. When all the pieces fall into place, planners and city officials say, there will be a nearly continuous ribbon of parkland and recreational space along the East Side. New Yorkers will no longer have to go west to enjoy the waterfront.

    “There isn’t any doubt that the East Side has lagged behind the extraordinary development of Hudson River Park,” said Vin Cipolla, president of the Municipal Art Society, a nonprofit organization devoted to planning and preservation. “But the vision for the East River Greenway is coming into more tangible view. It’s time.”

    Though the East River may lack the grandeur of the Hudson, there is much to savor: tugs cruise the choppy waters, a sandy beach fans out beneath the Brooklyn Bridge, the lights of the historic Pepsi-Cola sign streak the river red at night, the scent of salt hangs on the breeze.

    For decades, however, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive, as well as the river’s industrial legacy and the sprawling United Nations campus, has kept those pleasures mostly at a remove.
    Now, said Seth W. Pinsky, the president of the city’s Economic Development Corporation, “a golden age for the East River” is at hand, and even skeptical community leaders are feeling celebratory.

    “It’s sort of like, ‘Wow, things are actually happening,’ ” said Mark P. Thompson, chairman of Community Board 6, which represents the area from 59th Street to 14th Street, east of Lexington Avenue. “Piece by piece, our waterfront is finally being recognized and turned into something people can use.”

    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s 20-year plan for the waterfront, unveiled in March, made the East River a priority, and new East River ferry service to Brooklyn and Queens has proved to be wildly popular, attracting twice as many riders as were projected. But the most significant milestone came in October, when city and state officials agreed to a land deal involving the United Nations that could pay for a new 22-block East River esplanade.

    The deal lays out a complex set of transactions that would allow the United Nations to build a tower on part of a playground in east Midtown in exchange for $73 million and a replacement park.

    It would also unlock other financing for the esplanade, which would stretch from East 38th to East 60th Street, filling in what is now the biggest gap in the 32-mile Greenway around Manhattan.
    The United Nations has yet to agree to the terms, but it has long been thought to want the deal, and is in negotiations with the city.

    “The table has been set, and now the U.N. will have to come onboard,” said Adrian Benepe, the commissioner of the city’s Parks and Recreation Department. “I learned long ago in government never to promise anything unless you know the park is opening the next day, but things are moving in the right direction.”

    A stroll along the East River from Wall Street to Midtown reveals spots where access to the river remains obstructed by sanitation and utility structures, as well as parking and private development.

    Some city officials and community leaders acknowledge that the East Side is unlikely to match the West Side in terms of amenities. There are not as many piers left along the East River to serve as sites for skate parks, playgrounds and restaurants. Nor is there as much land between the highway and the water, crimping the potential for parkland. Another issue is the proximity of the F.D.R. Drive, which can be deafening.

    Still, impediments are being removed with speed. State Senator Daniel L. Squadron and Senator Charles E. Schumer, both Democrats, announced in mid-November that they had obtained $14 million from the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation to convert Pier 42, which now supports an empty warehouse, into open space. The money should cover the costs of shoring up the pier and demolishing the 600-foot-long shed on the site. Turning the four-acre pier into a park would cost tens of millions of dollars more, but Mr. Squadron called the initial investment “a foot in the door.”

    The pier will expand the southern end of East River Park, which runs from East 12th Street to Montgomery Street. At more than 45 acres, the park is the largest parcel of parkland on the river.

    The parks department is finishing a $98 million restoration of the park, where an esplanade almost collapsed a decade ago after marine borers chewed through its wooden pilings.

    “East River Park has always suffered from having a narrow and undistinguished entrance,” Mr. Benepe said. “Pier 42 would be a huge boon. It’s something we’ve coveted for a long time, but we never had the money to do it.”

    Farther south, in addition to opening Pier 15, the Economic Development Corporation has started preliminary work on Pier 35, just north of Rutgers Slip, and plans to open that to the public in 2013. Between those two piers is an esplanade that the city eventually plans to upgrade with new lighting and sleek wooden furniture, including bar stools and chaise longues. And construction is under way on a half-mile portion of the East River Waterfront Esplanade, from the tip of Lower Manhattan to Wall Street.

    On a warm November afternoon, office workers, residents and tourists flocked to the first two-block section of the esplanade, which opened in July, between Wall Street and Maiden Lane.
    “I had to get out of the office,” said Robert DiBarba, an information technology executive with a nearby bank, who was enjoying a red velvet cupcake amid the cry of gulls and the thrum of ferry engines. “It’s a good view.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/01/ny...1&ref=nyregion

  14. #119
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Rutherford
    Posts
    12,773

    Default

    Skipping most of the article here at work, but siting the map.... What would be the best way to put an "official" bridge across the north end to join the Hudson and East River waterfront runs? Being able to do "laps" around Manhattan might be a blast for people with enough stamina to go for more than 3 miles on a bike.....

  15. #120
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    2,128

    Default

    I used to bike a pretty grueling circuit, starting at battery park to take the Ferry to Staten Island. From there you bike on the north shore of SI then cross the Bayonne Bridge, through Bayonne, Jersey City, Hoboken, etc.. all the way up to the GWB back into Washington Heights, then all the way down the West side back to Battery Park. Was a fun ride except for the street biking in Jersey which sucks. I would love to break out the bike and completely circle Manhattan without going off a path. I've done around Manhattan by bike, but the East side has always been a problem, and there's no way to avoid the streets to go from east to west or vice versa when uptown

Page 8 of 13 FirstFirst ... 456789101112 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Greenways and Waterfront Development
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 198
    Last Post: July 21st, 2015, 01:30 AM
  2. Hudson River Park
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 383
    Last Post: July 3rd, 2014, 05:21 PM
  3. Replies: 7
    Last Post: April 26th, 2011, 04:09 AM
  4. DUMBO - Neighborhood on Brooklyn waterfront
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: September 26th, 2010, 02:53 PM
  5. Third Avenue Bridge - Across Harlem River
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For Visitors
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: February 10th, 2002, 06:36 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software