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Thread: Handbags at Ground Zero

  1. #1

    Cool Handbags at Ground Zero

    This was a recent poster from the International Anti Counterfeiting Coalition.

    A useful warning for tourists visiting downtown before they approach the illegal vendors.
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  2. #2
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Meh.

    While I do see thata s a problem, the fact that people are willing to pay more for a bag not because of the quality, and not even for its style, but for the make of it (designer) is sad.

    People are willing to pay for a cheap imitation of a bag because of the status it holds. The fake Rolex would be another example (though less prevalent now than the handbag thing).

    The thing that bothers me the most is not that people are willing to pay for quality or just a plain old good/well thought out bag, but that they can make so much money off a NAME. They are not buying it for quality (first), they are buying it because it is LV. They are willing to pay $300-$500 for a handbag that is no better than a well made $100 from a less known vendor just because of the designer label.

    And that very label is also what makes it an easy target for fakes.

    If people were more concerned about quality than name brand recognition and status symbols this would not be a problem.

  3. #3
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Ya know, I tend to agree with a lot of that.

  4. #4

    Default Sobering stuff in this White Paper

    Quote Originally Posted by MidtownGuy View Post
    Ya know, I tend to agree with a lot of that.
    http://www.iacc.org/resources/IACC_WhitePaper.pdf

  5. #5

    Default Article

    Fake Louis Vuittons Look Fake Without a Tony Aura, Study Says Share Business ExchangeTwitterFacebook| Email | Print | A A A


    By Meg Tirrell


    Dec. 2 (Bloomberg) -- If you want to tout that fake Louis Vuitton Le Radieux handbag as the real deal, you had better look the part, according to a Massachusetts Institute of Technology researcher.
    People are more likely to identify a designer handbag as authentic if the person carrying it wears expensive clothes or otherwise has that certain aura that says rich person, the research found. The study, by Renee Richardson Gosline, an assistant professor of marketing at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, showed that shoppers can more accurately distinguish between real designer bags and fakes if given social cues.
    Gosline showed 100 owners of luxury handbags photos of the items alone against blank backdrops and ones worn by people in social settings. She found that the ability to discern an item’s authenticity and the amount a shopper would pay for the product declined with the lack of context.
    “Counterfeits are really not serving as a substitute for the real thing at all,” Gosline, a former brand manager for LVMH Moet Hennessey Louis Vuitton, said yesterday in a telephone interview from Cambridge, Massachusetts-based MIT. “Consumers are a lot smarter than we may give them credit for -- just because you’ve got a nice fake doesn’t mean you’re going to get away with it.”
    Sales of counterfeit goods total about $600 billion worldwide, almost 7 percent of global trade, Gosline said in an unpublished research paper. That includes industries other than luxury goods, such as automotives, pharmaceuticals, media and consumer items, she said.
    Conspicuous Consumption
    Gosline’s research also supports the theory of conspicuous consumption -- that people will spend lavishly on goods to show off their wealth and social status. The study showed that people will pay twice as much for an item when they think they can use it to send cues about wealth and taste, she said.
    Luxury-products sales may rise next year for the first time since 2007, consulting firm Bain & Co. estimated in October. Revenue in the 153 billion-euro ($230 billion) industry is forecast to increase 1 percent in 2010, excluding currency movements, according to Bain’s study. Revenue this year is likely to fall 8 percent, the firm said.
    Still, fake luxury purses have a place on the social ladder. Many purchasers of knock-off bags move on to buy real ones within a few years, Gosline found in a separate study of 100 consumers.
    “The counterfeit actually served as a placebo for brand attachment,” she said. “People were becoming increasingly attached to the real brand even though they never possessed it at all.”
    From Fake to Real
    Forty-six percent of the counterfeit-bag owners bought the authentic products within two and a half years, she said. Shoppers were willing to pay $786 for a real luxury bag, which declined to $403, on average, when they saw the items out of context displayed against a neutral background, Gosline found in the other study.
    “People who look authentic to the brand -- high status people -- are far more able to get away with a fake than people who are not,” Gosline said. “A counterfeit is not necessarily going to do the same thing that a real brand will.”
    To contact the reporter on this story: Meg Tirrell in New York at mtirrell@bloomberg.net.
    Last Updated: December 2, 2009 12:47 EST

  6. #6
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    She found that the ability to discern an item’s authenticity and the amount a shopper would pay for the product declined with the lack of context.
    “Counterfeits are really not serving as a substitute for the real thing at all,”

    Um.... yes they are. If a rich, well dressed woman is carrying a $50 LV fake, if people thought she was wearing a real one because of context, then it IS a substitute for the real thing......

    “People who look authentic to the brand -- high status people -- are far more able to get away with a fake than people who are not,” Gosline said. “A counterfeit is not necessarily going to do the same thing that a real brand will.”
    They have a tallent for self-contradiction. I know they are trying to say that a peon buying a hack will not necessarily fool anyone, but they are also saying (in backwards speak) that a peon buying a genuine will also be less likely to convince anyone....


    They are saying that it is the person that makes the bag, not vice versa, but in a way that makes it seem like you should not buy a counterfiet.....
    Last edited by Ninjahedge; December 9th, 2009 at 02:30 PM.

  7. #7

    Default

    or more directly "pee-ons shouldn't buy bags at all"

  8. #8

    Default Dangerous business...

    NYC police: Officer kills Times Square scammer

    By TOM HAYS and CRISTIAN SALAZAR (AP) – December 10, 2009 33 minutes ago

    NEW YORK — A plainclothes cop chased a scam artist through sidewalks crowded with holiday shoppers and tourists Thursday in the heart of Times Square, killing the suspect near a landmark Broadway hotel after a gunfight that shattered box office and gift shop windows, police said.
    No one else was injured.
    The 25-year-old suspect and his brother were trying to dupe tourists into buying CDs and movies along Broadway and 46th Street just before noon when he was recognized by a sergeant who runs a task force that monitors aggressive panhandling, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said.
    The officer asked them for their tax identification, which allows peddlers to sell on the streets. But suspect took off running, through to the Marriott Marquis hotel's passenger drop-off area, Kelly said.
    The sergeant pursued, and the man turned and fired with a stolen Mac-10 machine pistol that held 30 rounds; he got off two shots before it jammed, police said. The officer fired four times, striking the suspect in the chest and arm and killing him, Kelly said.
    "We're lucky the weapon jammed," Kelly said.
    The commissioner said the shooting preliminarily appeared to be within department guidelines, which allow for deadly force when an officer's life is threatened.
    Dave Kinahan, a tourist from Boston, was parking his car in a spot below street level at the hotel when he saw one man shooting another.
    "I was 20 yards away," Kinahan said. He said he thought, "Is this real or this a movie?"
    The hotel is located in the Broadway theater district in the heart of Times Square. The Marquis Theatre, where "White Christmas" is now playing, is in the hotel. Bullets from the gunfight shattered the window of the Broadway Baby gift shop and a side window of the box office on the street, police said.
    Duncan Stewart, a Broadway casting director for National Artists Management Co., has a 12th-floor office that overlooks Times Square. He said he was on the phone when he heard three loud pops.
    Stewart has worked in Times Square for the past three years. He has gotten used to seeing the weird and wacky, but almost never anything violent.
    "It's bizarre. It's one thing to see the Naked Cowboy day after day in Times Square, but a shooting is something different altogether," he said.
    The slain man was not immediately identified. His brother was in police custody.
    Police say the two were working a scam in which they would approach tourists, ask them their names, then write their names on the CDs and movies and demand payment of $10.
    The suspect had been wanted for assault in the Bronx. The gun he used in the shooting was reported stolen in Richmond, Va., on Oct. 28, police said.
    He also had with him several business cards from gun dealers there, but it's not clear if he was also selling weapons, police said.
    One of the cards had a handwritten message on the back: "I just finished watching 'The Last Dragon.' I feel sorry for a cop if he think I'm getting into his paddy wagon," according to police. It's unclear who wrote the message, which apparently references the 1985 martial arts movie.
    NYPD spokesman Paul Browne said officers pay special attention to scams and panhandling during the holidays. Specialized units are set up in areas, including Times Square and Canal Street, where stolen goods, knockoffs and scams are prevalent.
    "We focus on them this time of the year, because they're preying on tourists during the Christmas holidays," Browne said.
    New York City's crackdown on panhandling began under former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, when "zero-tolerance" policing was instituted to curb quality-of-life offenses. Panhandling, public drinking, public urinating, graffiti and disorderly conduct were all part of the crackdown as a way to bring order to the city by sending the message that no crime would be tolerated.
    When Mayor Michael Bloomberg first took office in 2002, one of the first things he did was launch "Operation Clean Sweep," aimed at those same quality-of-life problems. By the end of Bloomberg's first term, the program had had resulted in some 33,000 arrests and 350,000 summonses.
    A few hours after the shooting, the area had returned to the normal holiday bustle, even as dozens of police officers surrounded the hotel, taping off the valet parking area.
    Donna Anderson of Murray, Utah, was staying at the Marquis. She was intrigued by what happened — not scared.
    "I wanted to get a picture of the crime scene," she said.

  9. #9
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Seemingly some conflicting reports on the shooting ...

    Not sure where this first reporting comes from, but it seems to indicate by the sequence in which events are laid out that the suspect turned and shot -- and then the officer returned fire ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sherpa View Post

    NYC police: Officer kills Times Square scammer

    NEW YORK — A plainclothes cop chased a scam artist through sidewalks crowded with holiday shoppers and tourists Thursday in the heart of Times Square, killing the suspect near a landmark Broadway hotel after a gunfight that shattered box office and gift shop windows, police said.

    [...]

    The sergeant pursued, and the man turned and fired with a stolen Mac-10 machine pistol that held 30 rounds; he got off two shots before it jammed, police said. The officer fired four times, striking the suspect in the chest and arm and killing him, Kelly said.

    "We're lucky the weapon jammed," Kelly said.
    From the NY Times (updated at 5:50 p.m.) ...

    Police Shoot and Kill Man Outside Hotel in Times Square

    On Thursday morning, the sergeant noticed two men who he believed had been responsible for a scam to intimidate visitors: They would first approach the tourists, then ask them their names, write their names on the CDs and then demand payment of $10.

    The sergeant confronted the men outside of 1515 Broadway, south of 45th Street, asking them for a tax stamp that would demonstrate that they had the right to sell CD’s.

    One of the men ran north, then west on 45th Street and onto the driveway of the Marriott, toward 46th Street. The sergeant gave chase, ordered the man to stop. Instead, the man pulled out a gun. Shots were exchanged: the man fired two rounds, while sergeant fired four.

    Mr. Kelly would not say who opened fire first.

  10. #10

    Default

    The intent of the International Anti Counterfeiting Coalition poster is right on. From fake Bud beer, MBenz engine blocks, fake Mitsubishi elevators installed in buildings in China to fake pharmaceuticals, the impact of fakes shouldn't be taken lightly.

  11. #11

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    from ^ article: "More alarming, say police, is counterfeiting's connection to the underworld. "Organized crime thrives on counterfeiting," says Ronald K. Noble, Secretary General of Interpol. So does terrorism. Noble says profits from pirated CDs sold in Central America have funded Hezbollah in the Middle East. One cigarette executive estimates North Korea earns $100 million per year in fees from pirates producing there. That kind of activity proves that buying fakes "isn't innocent, and it's not a game," says Bernard Arnault, chairman of luxury goods maker LVMH."


    interesting also to note that the Detroit "Lap-Bomber" came from West Africa.
    Last edited by Sherpa; December 29th, 2009 at 10:14 AM.

  12. #12
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Counterfeit Korean cigarettes

    If China is in that game then watch out (given the track record with stuff they've put in so-called bona-fide pet food, dry wall and the like).

  13. #13
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Again.

    Name = $$.

    Humans, no matter how evolved and intelligent we think we are, are still emotionally driven mammals with a desire to look better than the rest (although that has taken on MANY forms with our bigger brains, it is still the same deal).

    All society has done is convince someone that an LV is important enough to get a fake, even though 90% of peopel would not believe it is real because THEY own it anyway.......


    Whatever.

  14. #14

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    Terrorism funded by fakes is REAL

  15. #15
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Yeah, and there will ALWAYS be fakes regardless of who is selling them.

    So follow me on this one.

    Terrorists sell fakes.
    Fakes are made to imitate "designer" models.
    Fakes sell because they look like the originals and are much cheeper.
    The designer models are really expensive.


    So designers are responsible for global terrorism??!?!?!

    If LV sold for $50 a bag, there would be no market for a fake, there would be no $$ for Terrorists (I am really hating that generic bad guy term, as bad as "Communist" in the 80's) and the world would be at peace.


    Look, instead of trying to guilt trip people into not buying something, maybe dealing with their own feelings of self confidence and social worth would work better than trying to get them not to buy beccause they feel guilty.

    If that method worked, we would not have Wal Mart. See how successful it has been so far?

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