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Thread: Shanghai: Utterly amazing video!

  1. #1

    Default Shanghai: Utterly amazing video!


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    LL, would you forgive me if I say that that was actually underwhelming? I didn't realize how un-urban Shanghai was. It looks like every building has the planning panache of the Southbridge Towers, and the aesthetics of the new Goldman Sachs building. Not terrible buildings (as the Southbridge Towers are, and as most of the residential towers outside the absolute city center of Shanghai undoubtedly are), but about as interesting as the Goldman building. Possibly the antiseptic, Sim-City nature of the video contributed to my lack of excitement, but my money says that if you add in the grime and pollution, you just have the same old boring towers in the park with more traffic, garbage and smog.

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    That's fair enough. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

    However, don't you find this trio of 2,100, 1,500 and 1,350 towers amazing?


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    Very Impressive

    The sheer scale of Shanghai is quite awe inspiring although you have to ask yourself would you want to live in a city of such overwhelming proportions.






  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    That's fair enough. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

    However, don't you find this trio of 2,100, 1,500 and 1,350 towers amazing?

    The individual towers are great but look at that ground level. Towers in parks and highways. And that is the equivalent of Lower Manhattan. Horrific.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
    How does this square with your rather emphatic opinions on mierda and POS?

  7. #7

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    I've always wondered what the ground level is like in Pudong (i.e., are these buildings on unwalkable "highways").

    Anyway, these buildings are amazing. I love London, so no one should freak out, but as I've stated, other than Swiss Re (which isn't even very tall -- I think it's around 600 feet) and the Shard (which is basically an 800 foot tower with a "spire"), London really doesn't have any great skyscrapers notwithstanding its claims to the contrary. (Bishopsgate has a nice shape, but is no better than BofA, Bear Sterns, etc. Heron's skin is nice, but its shape is boring.)

    By contrast, many of Shanghai's towers are genuinely amazing.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    I've always wondered what the ground level is like in Pudong (i.e., are these buildings on unwalkable "highways").

    Anyway, these buildings are amazing. I love London, so no one should freak out, but as I've stated, other than Swiss Re (which isn't even very tall -- I think it's around 600 feet) and the Shard (which is basically an 800 foot tower with a "spire"), London really doesn't have any great skyscrapers notwithstanding its claims to the contrary. (Bishopsgate has a nice shape, but is no better than BofA, Bear Sterns, etc. Heron's skin is nice, but its shape is boring.)

    By contrast, many of Shanghai's towers are genuinely amazing.
    London is not in competition with Shanghai or indeed Dubai, there are strict rules with regard to sight lines in London.

    Richard Rogers Leadenhall Tower is quite impressive, although not massively tall it is fairly unique. Sadly it has been delayed by the current recession.









    Last edited by Codex; December 6th, 2009 at 08:56 AM.

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    Yes. It's vogue for British people to assert that London is the leading center for cutting-edge architecture. As we discussed yesterday, it has some amazing projects, but also a lot of mundane ones.

    Anyway, I agree re: Leadenhall, but let's see if it's built. Sadly, Britain's economy is in pretty dire shape compared with France, Germany and the US.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc View Post
    How does this square with your rather emphatic opinions on mierda and POS?
    It squares perfectly well. Many of the eyesores that I hate, many on this forum find acceptable. Similarly, not everyone finds Nigellas chunky ass and big hips attractive.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    Yes. It's vogue for British people to assert that London is the leading center for cutting-edge architecture. As we discussed yesterday, it has some amazing projects, but also a lot of mundane ones.

    Anyway, I agree re: Leadenhall, but let's see if it's built. Sadly, Britain's economy is in pretty dire shape compared with France, Germany and the US.
    Britain was obviously hit very hard by the banking crisis, as the country has a large financial sector, however things are starting to gradually pick up again. I also wouldn't say Britain was hit harder than the US which saw the collapse of it's real estate market due to the subprime mortgage crisis, the loss of banking giants like Lehman Brothers, as well as the near collapse of parts of it's car industry.

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    Britain was hit much harder than the US. Also, the US is already in recovery. The UK is not.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    Britain was hit much harder than the US. Also, the US is already in recovery. The UK is not.
    The UK is starting to recover -

    http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-...25-712596.html

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8217122.stm

    Our housing market was hit far less dramatically than the US, and it should also be noted that states such as California, one of America's powerhouses were on their knees and close to bankruptcy.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009...ing-state-debt

    US Car firm Chrysler only made it through the reccession thanks to Fiat taking a large share, whilst GM also filed for bankruptcy and even Ford had to ask for Government help.

    Wall street was just as badly hit as London, and US Banks and mortgage companies were devastated with major historic names such as Lehman Brother disappearing altogether.



    Last edited by Codex; December 6th, 2009 at 09:22 AM.

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    Codex,

    I'm not going to argue with you. However, The NY Times, The Financial Times, the Economist, Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal and the BBC all put the UK well behind the US in terms of a recovery, and bear in mind that the UK's economy is a fraction of the size of the US'.

    As far as Lehman goes, big deal. Other major investment banks have failed in prior downturns, and yet, NY remained the strongest financial center in the world.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonlawyer View Post
    Codex,

    I'm not going to argue with you. However, The NY Times, The Financial Times, the Economist, Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal and the BBC all put the UK well behind the US in terms of a recovery, and bear in mind that the UK's economy is a fraction of the size of the US'.

    As far as Lehman goes, big deal. Other major investment banks have failed in prior downturns, and yet, NY remained the strongest financial center in the world.
    The current US unemployment rate is currently 10% compared to 7.8% in the UK, hardly what I would call a great recovery.

    http://www.thestar.com/business/arti...ate-spurs-hope

    http://news.icm.ac.uk/business/uk-unemployment-growth-slows-down/4476/


    Whilst UK house sales and other barometers of economic performance are showing positive signs.

    http://www.propertywire.com/news/europe/better-than-expected-unemployment-figures-help-uk-property-market-report-shows-200912013720.html

    I would call the loss of some of Americas biggest companies, states such as California on the verge of bankruptcy and car companies such as Chrysler and GM filing for bankruptcy major problems on a par with that of the UK. I would also call a 10% unemployment rate far from being a rosy level of recovery.

    Furthermore the financial sector in the UK accounts for less than 10% of GDP, and doesn't just include banking, it also includes areas such as insurance and commodity trading. Furthermore the vast majority of banks in the city are foreign owned. UK industries such as Pharma and biotechs, IT, Defence Manufacturing, Aviation, Construction, Electronics and the Business Service sector are all strong, whilst service industries such as tourism and entertainment, and the education and knowlege sector are also very strong UK Industries.

    In terms of the US, the US Car Industry alone is probably as important to the US as the total financial sector is to the UK, so to suggest the US wasn't hit as hard is nonsense. The recession leading to car sales plummeting, US Real Esate plunging and the substantial US Financial Industry crashing.



    Last edited by Codex; December 7th, 2009 at 03:12 AM.

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