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Thread: Amanda Knox gets 26 Years

  1. #7036

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    For me the answer is implied between the lines. In the above link Picozzi describes Novelli as a "forensic geneticist of International fame". He does not even mention C&V by name but simply refers to them as consultants. He feels Hellman was wrong to simply let their findings stand. He feels Hellman should have granted Novelli's request for further testing. Novelli BTW does not believe there was contamination.

    ------

    Oh and by the way: the officially prefered Knoxian term for Follain is "prosecution lackey":

    http://www.google.it/search?client=s...LqWA4gTLr9n2Dw
    Given that he wrote articles and a book using the prosecution point of view, without questioning any of it, it seems appropriate to me.

  2. #7037

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    Novelli BTW does not believe there was contamination.
    This is so silly.

    The clasp had been moved around and was picked up off the floor weeks after the crime. The knife wasn't washed and had no blood on it.

    If there was "incriminating" DNA on either one, then under the circumstances, it's simply impossible to rule out some kind of contamination--could have happened anywhere between the crime scene and the lab. We don't need an expert or even Novelli to tell us that.

  3. #7038

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    The article describes Picozzi as a criminologist, but the discussion has been about forensic science, which is a different scientific discipline.

    Forensic science applies tools, such as chemistry and biology, to solve crimes. Criminology uses other tools, such as psychology, to explain how and why a crime was committed.

    If Picozzi is a criminologist and believes Knox and Sollecito are guilty, I wonder how he would construct a plausible murder narrative.

  4. #7039

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    Appeal date of Knox murder acquittal set

    ROME, July 19 (UPI) -- Italy's top court said it will hear the appeal on the acquittal of U.S. student Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito in the death of Merideth Kercher next year.The Court of Cassation announced Thursday that March 25 would be the start date to hear the prosecutor's appeal to have the acquittals overturned, Italy's ANSA news agency reported.In the original trial, Knox and Sollecito were found guilty and sentenced to 26 years and 25 years, respectively, in prison for the 2007 death of Kercher, a British exchange student, following what prosecutors alleged was a sex game that went wrong.

    Knox and Sollecito were acquitted on appeal in October, with a jury saying there wasn't enough evidence to prove their guilt.Separately, Rudy Guede, 21, of Ivory Coast, was convicted of Kercher's murder and sentenced to 30 years in prison. His conviction was upheld on appeal but the sentence was reduced to 16 years.

    http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2012/07/19/Appeal-date-of-Knox-murder-acquittal-set/UPI-75751342701079/

  5. #7040

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    Antonio Curatolo, witness in Amanda Knox case, dies at 56
    http://www.perugiatoday.it/cronaca/c...-funerali.html

  6. #7041
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    And guess who did it ...

  7. #7042

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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post
    And guess who did it ...
    Nature or nurture!




    Peace Curatolo, it was never really your fault, it's sad they ever considered you a 'witness' to begin with.

  8. #7043

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    Coming soon, to a bookstore and/or TV screen near you!

    http://pages.simonandschuster.com/honor-bound/

    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #7044

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    They should wait until after the US Election Follies.

  10. #7045
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Is that coming to Broadway Zip?

  11. #7046

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    They should wait until after the US Election Follies.
    Probably right. Raffaele is in New York right now, getting ready for TV appearances next week. Amanda's book won't be released until next spring, which is probably best.

  12. #7047
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Raffaele Sollecito makes new claims
    in memoir about Amanda Knox trial


    Knox's boyfriend at the time of Meredith Kercher's murder
    delivers a curious story in memoir that alleges sloppy police work


    THE GUARDIAN
    By Emma Brockes
    September 18, 2012

    Raffaele Sollecito, the less arresting of the two students convicted and eventually acquitted of the murder of British student Meredith Kercher, has a memoir out – a warm-up act to Amanda Knox's book out next year – and is in some ways the more curious story.

    Until now, Sollecito has been a relatively unknown quantity, presented in the tabloids as weedy foil to the femme fatale by his side (you can imagine him being played by Daniel Radcliffe in the movie) who said he was stoned on the night of the murder. In Honour Bound: My Journey to Hell and Back with Amanda Knox, he makes a slew of new claims about what he says was sloppy police work leading up to his conviction and what actually happened that night:

    • While being held in custody in Perugia, he writes, the police stripped him naked, threatened him and slapped him. During that first overnight interrogation, Sollecito was subject to what he calls a "less than scrupulous" set of "time-honoured pressure techniques", in which, he believes, the police asked him to repeat his story multiple times in order "to catch me out in whatever inconsistencies they could find".

    • He believes the police never seriously believed in his guilt, but pursued him aggressively in order to pressure him into testifying against Knox. The fact that he refused to do so, after the confusion of the first 24 hours, accounts in his opinion for the harsh treatment he received.


    • As part of a litany of either hapless or actively malicious police work, Sollecito says that when the police searched his apartment after his arrest, an officer called Finzi reached into the cutlery drawer in the kitchen, "pulled out the first knife that came to hand, a large chopping knife with an eight-inch blade", and turning to a fellow officer, said, "Will this knife do?", to which the answer came, "Yes, yes, it's great."


    • During early questioning, Sollecito wavered in his conviction that Knox had been beside him all night when the murder took place, which he puts down to being out of it after smoking pot, something he curses himself for in the book: "I knew I had nothing to do with Meredith's murder, but I was furious with myself for having such a foggy memory and I knew it was in part because of the joint I'd smoked on the afternoon of November 1."

    • While being held in custody in Perugia, he writes, the police stripped him naked, threatened him and slapped him. During that first overnight interrogation, Sollecito was subject to what he calls a "less than scrupulous" set of "time-honoured pressure techniques", in which, he believes, the police asked him to repeat his story multiple times in order "to catch me out in whatever inconsistencies they could find".

    • He believes the police never seriously believed in his guilt, but pursued him aggressively in order to pressure him into testifying against Knox. The fact that he refused to do so, after the confusion of the first 24 hours, accounts in his opinion for the harsh treatment he received.


    • As part of a litany of either hapless or actively malicious police work, Sollecito says that when the police searched his apartment after his arrest, an officer called Finzi reached into the cutlery drawer in the kitchen, "pulled out the first knife that came to hand, a large chopping knife with an eight-inch blade", and turning to a fellow officer, said, "Will this knife do?", to which the answer came, "Yes, yes, it's great."


    • During early questioning, Sollecito wavered in his conviction that Knox had been beside him all night when the murder took place, which he puts down to being out of it after smoking pot, something he curses himself for in the book: "I knew I had nothing to do with Meredith's murder, but I was furious with myself for having such a foggy memory and I knew it was in part because of the joint I'd smoked on the afternoon of November 1."


    • He is now certain she didn't leave his side: Knox didn't have a key to his apartment. If she had slipped out to murder Kercher, he writes, she would have had to ring the doorbell for him to let her back in. This didn't happen, says Sollecito.

    • Knox's behaviour after her arrest, which convicted her in the minds of many casual consumers of the story, made Sollecito "uneasy" and he wishes he had put his foot down at the police station when she "curled up on me like a koala bear, grabbing hold of my neck with both arms and resting her body in my lap", to which a passing police officer remarked, "behave yourselves".


    • Sollecito's own family made up the shortfall in police work by scouring the country for the sneaker that matched the bloody footprint at the crime scene, a Nike shoe but not, as the police maintained, one that matched Sollecito's Nike shoe. Eventually, Sollecito's uncle Giuseppe found an out-of-stock pair of Nikes in a sales rack with the same swirly pattern on the tread, and emphatically not the shoe that Sollecito owned.


    • Less helpfully, writes Sollecito, his family, and his lawyers, urged him to abandon Knox and change his testimony in order to buy police favour and save himself, something he refused to do. "I had made many mistakes," he writes, "but my determination to stick by Amanda, and by what I knew to be the truth, was one thing I knew I had exactly right. Nothing in the world – not the people I cared about most, and certainly not the threat of further punishment for a crime I did not commit – could induce me to change my mind."


    • He was punished by the police for this lack of co-operation, he believes, with unjustifiably harsh treatment, including six months of solitary confinement (longer than Knox) and assignment to the sex offender wing of the prison. "Nothing was said explicitly, but the subtext seemed clear: if you don't want to tell us what we want to hear, you can take your chances with the perverts and child molesters and transsexuals and see how you like that instead." It's unclear what transsexuals are doing on this list, but one gets the point.


    • This isn't new information, but is still extraordinary to consider that Knox and Sollecito had been dating for one week before the murder. Speculation on whether, after the release, they were going to "get back together" made no sense in the context and underlines the strangeness of their connection to each other; how exactly do you relate to someone wrongly co-convicted with you in a murder trial? Sollecito details the difficulties of the reunion he had with Knox after their release. "I wasn't at all sure it was a good idea to see her and I wavered back and forth even after I had booked my ticket. We had been through so much; perhaps we owed it to each other to live our lives and leave each other in peace."


  13. #7048

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    As part of a litany of either hapless or actively malicious police work, Sollecito says that when the police searched his apartment after his arrest, an officer called Finzi reached into the cutlery drawer in the kitchen, "pulled out the first knife that came to hand, a large chopping knife with an eight-inch blade", and turning to a fellow officer, said, "Will this knife do?", to which the answer came, "Yes, yes, it's great."
    I have doubts that it happened exactly that way, but it does sarcastically describe how the knife came to be the murder weapon.

    Will there be another charge of defamation; will this case become a perpetual motion machine?

  14. #7049
    Chief Antagonist Ninjahedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp View Post
    will this case become a perpetual Emotion machine?
    FTFY......

    (BTW, we shall see).

  15. #7050

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